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Found 10 results

  1. I’m not sure if I ever posted this or not. If I did then just know my memory is going as I get older and over look me! We did this complete office out of Hickory Slabs. The desk has a live live edge on one side and is two slabs glued together. The ends were made of thick pieces of Hickory and we put metal conduit in the middle and painted them black. The shelves were all slabs with live edge. Used the conduit as supports painted black. They painted the wall behind the shelves black. The black wall really let the light Hickory slabs stand out. The desk was finished with self leveling Epoxy. I really love the rug they chose to bring it all together. A really nice custom office.
  2. I got a call last week from "the building guy" at a local, 120 year old, classic stone church. He had two doors they had taken down during remodeling and did not just want to trash them. He thought they were solid teak. We wandered through the catacombs and found them and just about got them loaded when his comrade said, "There's two more over there." So I managed to squeeze the 4 doors that were supposed to be 7' tall but were 8' tall into my Odyssey. I need to do some hardware removal and cutting to ensure that it's really solid, then take to the woodworking club meeting to share with whomever. I think resawed in half, they'd make some nice small boxes. My grand-daughters could use some, I think. The second is a bunch of 12" dowel factory hickory cutoffs. One 20 lb bundle for $5 or 5 for $20. During my Christmas turkey smoking, I reached the end of my stockpile of hickory and apple wood. So I bought the 5 bundles figuring I'd save some for smoking, some for the shop and see if I can get rid of the rest at 10 for a dollar or so. Wish me luck. Waiting until the weather gets above 50 degrees so I can saw up the doors outside. Man, they are HEAVY.
  3. Have a current order for honey dippers, this is the first batch of 20 finished. Some of the these have some really nice grain in the lids. Steve
  4. Since this web site is as much about lessons learned as it is about displaying our successful efforts, let me share my ongoing experience, namely that I made two incompatible decisions. Lately I have been interested in trying different woods with which I have not yet worked. My choice was Hickory. I have also wanted to develop more confidence using hand tools instead of relying solely on machines. I decided to make a project for my wife, using hand tools as much as possible. I guess that was a third decision to add to the incompatibility morass. Part of the project involved chopping out mortises using a good set of Marples chisels and my dead blow mallet. I'll leave it at that, except to say that the lesson learned was that if the desire is to practice/develop hand tool expertise, don't start with on of the hardest, densest, heaviest woods available. Oh well, nothing several kits of epoxy can't fix.
  5. Someone in one my FB groups posted a picture of a "skeleton" clock. I didn't know what that was until after I did some research. I guess all it means is that a person can see the gears. The one I saw was on a pedestal and it was very nice looking. I need a demo for June and had a little different vision for one. When I do a demo I will make several of an item to make I have it down. So far I've made four of these, no pictures of the first one. It was just to figure out dimensions and diameters. Let me know what you honestly think please. This is the second I did, it is very simple and very basic, I actually kind of like the front view of this one. It is made from a piece of 8/4 walnut as about 1 1/8 thickness is needed to hide the back of the clock. This is a perspective view and it just doesn't work IMO. The brass trim ring looks huge on this one. You probably noticed there is no foot. There isn't a foot on any of these. My vision is for the clock to sit on a high shelf or fireplace mantle and kind of rise out of the surface. This is the next one, it is white oak and walnut. I have always liked the way those two woods look together. IMO, the walnut feature ring is just too small and is hard to see. On all of the clocks it's hard to see the hands from any distance but I think that's the movement itself. Persepective on the walnut and white oak clock, definitely looks better in the front view. This one is a little heavy on the front too. it would be okay on a mantle or high shelf but on a table it would tip over if bumped. This is the last one I've done and the best one I think. It is hickory and walnut. I like the white oak and walnut better but the walnut ring is better on this one I think. For what it's worth, it's the same movement in all three. It just presses into a 2 3/4" diameter hole. You can tell in this one how hard are the hands to see. Perspective on the last one. Let me know what you think, not sure about the look and maybe a foot will be necessary. Steve
  6. A couple of weeks ago I posted this picture of some logs I got from a lady, carried to the mill to get sawn into lumber. Yesterday I got a call from my sawyer to come pick up the lumber. So we hooked up the 18' trailer and headed out to the saw mill which is about 10 miles from the house. As it turned out most of the logs were White Oak and a couple of Red Oak, two Poplar and two Hickory. He cut away the bad parts on the outside of the logs and looks like we got some good lumber. I had all of it sawn at 5/4 and there are a few pieces thicker. Most of the White Oak is on the front, some Red Oak and Poplar on the back and the Hickory on top. I have about 3' hanging off the back of the trailer. Not bad for $200.00.
  7. Today was the day to go do a little lumber shopping. I had a lady call me about these logs that were stacked close to her house and she wanted them gone. He husband had cut them and stacked them and she had no idea what it was and he had passed away. So I told her I would be happy to get them out of her way. She said come and get it. So this is how I shop for lumber. Much easier to put them on the trailer this way and easy to handle. After they were loaded I headed to the saw mill and let them unload them. He will call when me when they are ready to cut. I had him to cut them 5/4's. It will run .20/BF. Hard to beat those prices and it is nice to have friends with big equipment. So now I am back home and cleaning up the shop.
  8. When I was turning some of those Easter eggs, I did find out one thing about Hickory wood. It is listed as one of America's hardest woods and therefore I figured a good candidate for the chatter/stutter tool. Not so much, at least for the Hickory I got at HD. Having never used it before, I didn't know what to expect. It was hard but the more open grain in between the hard grain.........tore out easily. I don't know if it is a trait of Hickory or it was just the piece I got. The Maple reacted much better to the chatter tools. Anyone ever turn Hicklory?
  9. A friend had several trees taken down recently and set me up with a few chunks of hickory firewood. So today I pulled out the mallet and splitting wedges and the big bandsaw and cut them into 2 1/2 and 3 inch slabs. All the ends got sealed with my potpourri crock pot candle wax. The shop smelled good all day too! They are stacked. Now the wait is on for drying. Not quite an entire hand tool post so forgive me for that. Just raw material manufacture for future chisel repairs etc. Inagural run for the big bandsaw too! I think it and I are going to be friends!
  10. I took a class at my Woodcraft store last week for making end grain cutting boards. It turned out I was the only one that signed up for the class so I got the instructor's full attention. Another plus was that since I was the only one there we had lots of time so I ended up with two boards. I'd seen her boards at a craft show before and thought that the way the patterns ran was pretty interesting and wanted to see how she did it. Really it was pretty simple, I should have seen it myself. We had a good time anyway for three nights. I'm wanting to make some more. I think I want to find some hickory, I think that could make some interesting end grain patterns. The biggest problem I see with these boards is that they look too nice to use. She had me sanding them down to 600 grit and they are like glass.
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