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Found 437 results

  1. A nice little video from Mike Peace talking about how to make quick measurements a little easier.
  2. Turn Fast, Sand Slow
  3. In February 2018 after searching the local ads for a couple of years I came across this Logan 11" lathe ( model 922). It looked to be fairly complete and when I inspected it I found very few problems. It came with both a 3 and a 4 jaw chuck as well as nice steady rest. It was misssing the peg leg and suffered some damage as a result. I ended up paying $1200 Canadian (about $900 US at the time). Moving it was an experience as it is heavy and I am not young. Luckily I had watched Mr Pete's 222 video on disassembly. Took as many pieces off as possible. The tricky part was removing the bed (heaviest part) as the bolts also connect the legs. Ended up with the owner holding onto both legs while we lifted the bed. When I got it home I stored it in a pile and there it lay until November . I should say the in the interim I carefully inspected each part for damage and searched down all the parts needed. Finally in mid November I got started. The paint although it looks good in the first picture was terrible. Three coats with the final one being spray bombed on everything. Much of it was flaking off. After weeks of scraping, wire wheeling and buffing then repainting everything was ready to reassemble Finally got it all put together and ready to make some chips. I has been close to 50 years since I last ran a lathe so it may take a while to get back up to speed . Should be fun.
  4. Gerald

    Off Center

    This is the first try with the off center chuck. This is green bradford pear and for this did not do well, so will sand. And after some sanding is better but blurred some lines. It did not show a a three axis turning well until I centered and turned the bottom and top. More on this later.
  5. I posted earlier I was going to make a French knitter, or knitting nancy for the Feb. demo for our club. I've often said, no one learns more during a demo than the person doing the demo. I've also often said, I will make every mistake possible before I figure something out. This project is a good example of both of those statements. Since it's still winter and kind of the holidays I thought about making one in a kind of snow man shape. Grabbed a piece of spalted birch and turned this one. I was basically happy with it but it occurred to me I could make a snowman(or snowlady) shape and hide the pins and pic under the hat. Tried to do a couple with the spalted birch but it was too punky to get a good fit between the hat and the tenon. I also felt it was important to get a good grain match so the whole thing would look like just one piece. Since the spalted wood was too punky I grabbed a piece of hard maple. Parted off a piece for the lid and drilled to accept a tenon. Naturally I forgot it would have to be drilled deeper to make room for the pins and pic. Of course, I noticed this about 2 seconds after parting it off so I couldn't fix it. Since it's important to me to match the grain and hide the joint I grabbed a whole new piece of wood to start over. Okay, so now I've made a new snowman and have the hat drilled deep enough to work. Grain matches nicely and it's a nice friction fit. Plenty of clearance for the pins and the pic. Made the pic, fits nicely under the hat and it's nice snug fit in the center hole of the snowman. Too snug actually, can't really grasp the pic to remove it easily. Decide I'm going to put a little step on the next one so it won't go in so far and will be easier to remove. Great idea, except I left the top to big around to fit between the pins. Back to the lathe, last one works but is too sloppy and will rattle when it's under the lid. Enough for today, back to the lathe in morning and incorporate all the little nuances to maybe make one that will be just right. All of these little details that I'm figuring out will become part of the demo. It's a simple little turning but I've learned a lot already. Steve
  6. Haven't figured out how to send a pic, and the last two times I put this question out, someone deleted it. I cannot find anyone who knows anything about this oddity of a small cast iron wood plane. It has an enclosure for wood shavings, and the top is hinged at the rear. right at the rear is the slot and a cutter blade. The enclosure catches the shavings, and you have to raise the lid to empty them. It has no name or any other identifying marks. It is about 5" long, and the antique store I found it at had a string and tag identifying it as an "antique wood lathe." So, the owner of the store did not know what it was. Two people have tried to find one on the internet with no success. Thought some of you might know a little about it. Just because I don't have a picture of it doesn't mean you have a right to delete it for the third time!
  7. I've got the demo for February for our club. Can't complain, several other members have really stepped up and covered the last few months. That makes it so much easier. Anyway, the Feb. demo will be two parts. The first half hour or so I'll be doing some sharpening on, and talking about the Tormek sharpener. I've allotted a half hour but if there are a few questions it could go longer. With that in mind I need a relatively quick project for the turning portion of the demo. Have decided to make a "Knitting Nancy" or French Knitter. A simple spindle project which will be a good skill builder and something I believe hasn't been done before. Even though it's a fairly simple thing to make I will still make several before I'm done. At the top beside the yarn is my first effort. I saw one that looked like they used paper clips to hold the yarn but that didn't work well for me, that and I had the diameter too large to make a good stitch. I saw one someone made that used cotter keys as shown in the walnut one to the left. Cotter keys actually worked pretty well, but, they're cotter keys. I then decided to just make the pins to hold the yarn and they are pretty easy to do and look a lot better IMO. The one in the middle is my last effort and has the wooden pins. The little yarn rope is what a person makes with one of these and is called an "Icord", although, our two year old grand daughter calls it a "snake". From what I read, an icord is a basic knitting or crochet stitch and is used as a border or foundation for other stitches. There are three parts to one of these, the body, which is basically just a tube, the pins, and the hook, or pic. My first thought was to make a hook but after experimenting a little bit I realized the pic type actually is easier to use. The pic is a nice little skew project all by itself. Will probably do five or six more of these, last couple I will record and work out of my tool bags to make sure I don't forget anything. Steve
  8. Gerald

    Cottonwood spaulted dyed

    From the album: Hollow Forms

    Cottonwood spaulted and dyed with layered yellow and green. Note that green area on the spault was only dyed with yellow. Used Chestnut Stains and finished with lacquer.
  9. Perusing Craigslist and found this wonderful example of a Shopsmith 10ER here in So Cal. And it's sister sitting beside it, both for $350.00. The ER in front was restored, if only I was ready to go down that road, I'd a snapped it up in a heart beat! Love the way they look.
  10. Oiled up a couple bowls this morning. First is a natural edge walnut bowl not quite 14" diameter. This is a pretty big bowl, almost 6" deep. It has a really heavy bark layer on it. Next is a maple bowl about 13". This bowl is kind of like that toxic relationship everyone has had at some time or another. You know you should just walk away from it and cut your losses but just keep investing time and effort into making it work. This bowl cracked and then cracked some more. Carved out the cracks and filled them with alumilite casting resin and copper powder. If not for the really nice grain in it, it would've been toast(literally). First time working with the casting resin and I can see more of that in my future. Steve
  11. Just in time for Christmas. These were a labor of love and I'm really happy how they finished up. Even so, I am so-o-o-o glad they are done. 8 cryptex boxes for the grand kids. I have no delusions about how the boxes will compare to the fancy electronic gadgets kids want these days, but maybe one day they'll be appreciated. I think I posted in progress pictures of these a while back but not sure. I actually started them in the summer but shelved them until closer to Christmas. Last week, I decided I needed another, really had to scratch to remember how I'd done everything, even had to go back and watch Carl Jacobson's excellent video on making them again. The code on each one is their birth day with "Z"=zero and "A"=1 etc. Steve
  12. I don't know why I never thought of this, it's so common too, just another way to turn an existing tool into another. @Gene Howe. Does Shopsmith till make the sander for the lathe, I could not find it. OR
  13. Been wanting to have one of these for my lathe and finally got around to making it. Had almost everything lying around the shop. Scrap plywood ~ 17" x 48" and a piece ~ 10" x 10". Hardware is all 1/4 x 20 machine bolts/nuts and fender washers. I may replace the wing nuts with knobs to make it a little easier on old hands. The cam action hold down has been in my "extras box" for a couple of years waiting on a worthwhile project. Got it from Woodcraft. The wheels are from an $8 pair of In-Line Skates bought from Goodwill. The "circle" is made of 3 layers of 3/4 plywood. The wheel holders are made of Maple. There is a Maple "guide" on the bottom of the base that helps trap the assembly between the lathe bed rails. I works pretty well, the wheel holders need a little sanding and bees wax to allow them to slide a bit more freely. The base may be a bit too wide although my large tool rest can allow access to the edge of the turning. Thanks for looking! Comments are always welcome!
  14. Been dealing with some family issues and haven't been in the shop very much. I did finish a couple pieces yesterday and today. Both are maple and both are right at 12" diameter. I think these two pieces really illustrate just how versatile is maple. First is a shallow bowl or deep platter, would probably work either way. Next is a platter, my attempt at a "traditional Irish platter" from the Glenn Lucas DVD and this is also one of the things a person will turn during his class. This is wormy, spalted, maple. Actually, in the interest of full disclosure and truth in advertising, this one is wormy, spalted, maple and superglue, a ton of it. Thanks for looking. Steve
  15. Came upon a new kind of light which an be very useful on lathes. Found it on ebay . It is a sewing machine light. It comes with no plug since it has to be threaded thru the mount you choose. I did a kinda cantilever so I can move it out of the way when not in use. Just happened to have a strain relief to relieve the cord . I used a led for the light and you can then pick the color temp (5000 preferred) and luminosity you want. This $20 saves me from buying a $100 led flex light. There may be a cheaper one but under $20 this was the best I was willing to look for. https://www.ebay.com/itm/SEWING-MACHINE-FLEXIBLE-GOOSENECK-WORKING-LAMP-LIGHT/401145445865?hash=item5d6621bde9:g:hPsAAOxykMpTJJ1I:rk:14:pf:0
  16. Early August I took my step-father to the 38th Annual Tippecanoe Antique Tractor & Power Show. First time I had ever been too and from what we heard, maybe the last. It was hotter than Hades most of the day so it was kind of rough to see everything. I was really concerned about "Pops" being 91-1/2 y/o so we sat under the big tent a lot and drank free ice water as needed. All-in-all it was an enjoyable day if for no other reason than to get him out of the house for a while and do something he would enjoy. On the way out, I happened to stop by a vendor who had several small items on a table for sale...this one caught my eye and his was OK with me taking pictures. There was no price on it so respecting the old adage, "if you have to ask the price, you probably can't afford it" I didn't ask... I did do a little research and found some info and other pictures HERE AND HERE Also a You-Tube video of one running following the pictures... ManSon -- Small Machines Inc. West Los Angeles 25 California Just a really cool, fully functional self/manual feed mini metal working lathe. Motor is under the head stock spindle. Complete with accessory kit. Just a little different angle of above picture. Even has a coolant catch basin under the bed.
  17. Doing a little art/craft show this weekend. That will make three for me this year, definitely have to cut back next year!! Anyway, trying to get a few pieces done to display. This maple bowl is one of them. This bowl was turned to finish green and has a nice little warp to it. Don't know why but people seem to like that. It is 17.5" diameter at it's widest point. Both of these bowls still need buffed. The bottom A little natural edge white oak bowl, I think it's interesting how spalted is the sap wood but the heart wood is solid as a rock. The bark was toast on this one before it was turned at all. This bowl is actually one from the class with Glenn Lucas last week. The lesson was on turning natural edge but also centering and balancing the bowl with the grain and getting clean cuts. About 15 minutes sanding on this one, which is cray, cray, for me. The bottom. Have shied away from turning oak, just never thought I would like it, this particular piece of wood was great to work with, cut like butter with little tear out. Steve
  18. One of the bowls we did last week with Glenn Lucas was a milk paint bowl. The technique works best with an open grain wood like ash or oak. The bowl is turned close to finish and then wire brushed to open the grain. After brushing it gets painted with milk paint. After painting the final details are cut, in this case, the rim and the bead. It's a neat effect I think but probably not for everyone. We also talked about form and balancing the grain in a bowl. Form is not perfect on this one, I can see a little flat spot in it. A guy like Glenn considers nuances and details most of us never would. Anyway, I wanted to do something on the bottom so I didn't finish mine until I got home. It is finished with mineral oil and beeswax. Steve
  19. Was playing around a little today and thought I'd try something new. I had a little walnut crotch that was really to small to do much so I thought I'd try to turn a thin, natural edge, winged bowl just for fun. Have always wanted to try something like this but didn't really know where to start. It actually went better than I expected and even though I could see some sanding in my future I was pretty happy with what was emerging. The bowl was coming along nicely and I was really happy with the thickness. Was cleaning up around the bottom of the bowl, lost concentration for just an instant and nicked the bowl with the tool. Dohhh, pay attention!! Still, it was fun, I learned, and the next one will be better. Like professor Moody says "constant vigilance!!" Steve
  20. Spending a week at Marc Adams Academy of Woodworking just south of Indianapolis. A most amazing place!! I am taking a class with Glenn Lucas again this year, what a great technician and what a great teacher. Almost posted this in the general wood working area but since I'm taking a turning class I decided to post it here. Just thought I'd share a few pictures of the facility. It's important to note these pictures don't begin to show just how extensive this complex is. One of the assistants told me there are about 40,000 square feet under roof. There are about 400 people who have completed the masters program here, it's an extensive training and requires serious dedication to get that done. This is a wall that has several inspirational or clever snippets on it. This one is my favorite. 2018 instructors. the lathe room, 16(I think) oneway 1624 lathes. One of the machining rooms, there are several One of the assembly rooms, and again, there are several. This class is working on a Nakashima style side table. A display case of some completed projects Kind of like wood worker Nirvana Steve
  21. I really like turning maple, many times with the intention of embellishing it as the grain can lend itself to that. Now and then however you stumble into a piece that would be a crime to embellishment at all. I feel I hit the jackpot on this particular piece of wood, at least as far as it having beautiful grain. Didn't put my normal zentangle pattern on the bottom of this one, the grain was just too spectacular. Hated to even sign it but found the "plainest" spot I could. Steve
  22. My first one was really clumsy. it was mostly wood and nothing I did would hold up well. I used 3/8-16 threads and huge knobs and still I couldn't get a solid positional clamp; it kept flopping. Anyway this one is all aluminum and steel. I made it tool-less. There are knurled knobs for everything. I had an extrusion I mounted to the back of the lathe and hung it all from that. The threads in the aluminum are all helicoils.
  23. Any Shopsmith owners, @Gene Howe etc, can you tell me if a universal live center will fit a Shopsmith lathe tailstock or does only the SS live center fit the tailstock assembly? Thanks!
  24. Just a neat ol video, classic, and warm. It's long, 20 minutes, if you got nuttin going on, it's worth the watch. You can go full screen on it, just click on the separation arrows at the lower right of the video box.
  25. Maintenance is always a hot topic but just how do you do it. The first video covers the tailstock and quill and I have used this as a guide.

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