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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

The Patriot Woodworkers with Operation Ward 57 Adopt a Wounded Warrior Family for the Holidays - 2019 project is live, please click on link to view our very special annual project.

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  • lew

    Part 5:

    By lew

    Part 5:   As “Norm” used to say- “We’re gaining on it now.”   Time for the first dry fit to make sure all the mortice and tenons fit together.     Had to futz with a few of the tenons but overall everything went together nicely. You can see why I’m limited to the size of my projects. This is the only assembly space available- add clamps around a piece and things really get tight.   There were still a few more things left to do with the apron and
    • 0 comments
    • 1,016 views
  • lew

    And Finally...

    By lew

    And Finally: The last bit of machining was to create the two lower shelves. The minister wanted to keep the “maple” look for the shelves but hard maple is a little expensive so we went with soft maple.     Planed everything to ¾” and used biscuits to help with alignment during glue up. I made these shelves full width during the glue-ups     A card scraper brought everything smooth.   I sized the shelves using the same procedures as t
    • 12 comments
    • 1,968 views
  • Steve Krumanaker

    Making name tags using inkscape

    By Steve Krumanaker

    I've mentioned that to take advantage of the potential of one of these little laser engravers  there are some software programs to know. One of these is an open source program called "inkscape". To someone who has never used it, inkscape can be intimidating as there are so many menus, options, controls, etc. etc. With a little effort it all starts to make sense and a person begins to understand what is going on. This is a little step-by-step to create a name tag file that can be used with a cnc
    • 3 comments
    • 1,905 views
  • Gerald

    How I got this started

    By Gerald

    Where to start is to determine just what do you want to use the bench for. At the time for me it was flatwork and planing. I looked at many plans and decided on parts of several. Not sure where each part came from but the contributing plans were in Wood Magazine, Shop Notes and Popular Mechanics.   I started with the vices. Both are Lee Valley and maybe even paid full price. They are both front vices but one is mounted on the end. Next is to decide on the wood. I wanted White Oak and i
    • 3 comments
    • 113 views
  • Joe Candrilli

    Segment Day One

    By Joe Candrilli

    I moved this post here, figured it was more appropriate as a blog vice a random post...   I figured this would be a great place to document my path down segmented turning.  That way we can all look back years later and laugh...   Today I will start with why I am looking at getting into segmented turning in the first place.  Last Christmas I was trying to figure out what to get my dad for a gift.  He is at the stage where there isn't much he needs, and I had already made him a
    • 1 comment
    • 979 views
Part 9- Finishing Up

Part 9- Finishing Up

Better add some sort of dust collection to this thing before I do anymore testing! This is what the finished “hood” looks like- (in place,top view, underside)         Had the ½” plywood from another project. This is just a simple box. I wanted some way to hold it in place and be able to remove it without tools. Made two brackets from 1” aluminum angle “iron” to catch one side and some button magnets for the other side. Dust collection is a 2 ½

lew

lew

Part 8- Some Refinements

Part 8- Some Refinements

Most of the photos used for this part of the blog were taken “along the way.” As with everything made in my shop, there are always changes, modifications and “S**t! I should have….”.  The first thing was when Mimi passed by and said, “it’s nice but where are you going to put it”? Anyone who has been in the shop knows you need a road map and a course in choreography to get around all of the stuff crammed in there. OK, we are gonna need some wheels to move this thing out of the way. (whe

lew

lew

Part 7- Adding The Sandpaper

Part 7- Adding The Sandpaper

It was finally time to add the sand paper to the drum. Having decided on a Velcro (hook and loop) system, it was off to Super Grit http://www.supergrit.com/ . Their store is only a half an hour drive from here. The hook portion required 5 feet of material. This PSA stuff is 4” wide and is $2/foot. Also bought 3 different grits of the 3” wide loop paper. Their minimum purchase is 3 yards but at between $1.50 to $2.00 a yard it is reasonable. It took about 73” to wrap the drum but I think I can ge

lew

lew

Part 6- Mounting The Table

Part 6- Mounting The Table

The final major part of the assembly is the table. The piece of ¾” Melamine is from the scrap box at the local Vocational School and the piano hinges are pieces left from a project made for my brother in law. The top is reinforced with a frame of ¾” plywood on three sides and a 1” piece of oak on the hinge side. (top and bottom w hinge)       The hinge is then screwed to a mounting/adjusting bracket that fits between the two sides of the frame. A slotted hole

lew

lew

Part 5- Mounting The Drum And Motor

Part 5- Mounting The Drum And Motor

Time to mount the drum and motor to the frame. The choice of 2 x 6 sides was made to hopefully eliminate any flexing when work pieces were in contact with the sanding surface. However, that lead to difficulty in figuring out how to be able to mount the drum bearings to the sides. Long carriage bolts can be expensive! The sides are counter bored about 3” and then drilled to match the bolt diameter. An area around the mounting surface was mortised for an aluminum plate. The pillow block beari

lew

lew

Part 4- Building The Frame

Part 4- Building The Frame

Now that the drum runs true and the table lift works, it was time to start building the frame. My intention was to use mortise and tenon joinery but my choice of material was 2 x 6 for the top and bottom of the sides. This was larger than my mortiser could handle. I know, I could have chopped them out by hand. I opted for half lap joints. The overall width of the frame is 23” and the table height is about 31”. The length, at the bottom, is about 36”. The table is 16” x 24”. The frame is mad

lew

lew

Part 3- Table Adjustment Mechanism

Part 3- Table Adjustment Mechanism

After researching many sander designs and knowing my tendency to over engineer everything, there was only one choice for the table adjusting/lifting mechanism. The source of the lift came from this site and I give the author full credit- http://home.mchsi.com/~woodywrkng/DrumSander.html. The only change/addition I made was to add springs the help eliminate any “backlash” in the movement. The author of the site felt this mechanism gave more support over the full width of the table. The

lew

lew

Part 2- Testing The Drum

Part 2- Testing The Drum

After building the drum, a test was in order. After all, if this part didn’t run true there was no sense in moving forward. Using a piece of Corian, the motor and drum were clamped down in position. The motor is a 120v 1/3 HP motor salvaged out of our old furnace. The belt is the one from my table saw- a link belt replaced it.   (fire in the hole and Test 2)       With some anxiousness, power was applied. Holy Cow, It Worked!! The pulley ratio

lew

lew

Part 1- The Drum

Part 1- The Drum

When making my rolling pins, I use the thickness planer to bring the thin strips down to 1/8” thick. Unfortunately, if the grain in the wood is not uniform- or there are knots- the strips shatter. This wastes a lot of wood and doesn’t do the planer any good either. It seemed to me a thickness sander would be perfect for this process. Well, Craig’s List wasn’t producing any results and I couldn’t afford a new one. Time to take action!   Starting with what seemed to me to be the most cri

lew

lew

 

attaining a snowflake

To start one needs a program like Rapid resizer then go to Pinterest... maybe like a few thousand flakes to choose from..  Find one you like and click on it to make it the largest size on the screen before you click on to Save as and here I use Documents to store this type of pictures.    Now you need a printer. No big deal here for I use for this is a Canon # 2522. About two or three months ago it was on sale  for less than 20 bucks.   Once the picture is stored in doc

Smallpatch

Smallpatch

Part #5 Some Final Thoughts

Part #5 Some Final Thoughts

In Part #1, I mentioned that the pattern of the Celtic knot can be varied by how much wood is removed during the creation of the slots. Typically, I plow out a 3/8" wide slot and fill it with three inserts. That technique results in a pattern of knots that overlap-       If the slot is cut, leaving a center slice of wood intact, and then placing an insert on each side; the pattern displays diamonds at the cross-over-         Another subtle

lew

lew

Part #4 The Glue-up and Turning

Part #4 The Glue-up and Turning

I found it easier to glue if I oriented the blank with the diagonal cut facing up. I use an old restaurant cutting board as a gluing work surface and pieces of the cutting board as culls and pads. In this picture, you can see the three strips to be glued into place. They measure 2” x 10 3/4” x 1/8”. Test fit the pieces first to make sure they will seat into the slot. (I now have a thick piece of Corian countertop for the gluing surface)     On my first attempt, I didn’t use

lew

lew

Part#3 Making the cuts

Part#3 Making the cuts

Once the blank has the layout lines drawn, it is time to cut the slots for the ellipses. The first step is to set the blade height. When the cut is made, there should be about 3/32" to 1/8” of material left holding the two sides together. This is necessary during the glue up by keeping the pieces aligned.   Set the blank on the jig and adjust the angle and the end stop so that the front SHORTER layout line is positioned to the LEFT side of the blade cut. Orientation is

lew

lew

Part#2 Layout

Part#2 Layout

The second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22” long and 2” square.    Locate the center of the length (11”) and carry a line around the blank.   The ellipses are 11” long and made of three pieces of 1/8” thick material Layout a mark 5 ½” on either side of the centerline and accurately carry the lines around the blank.   To assist in laying out the diagona

lew

lew

Part 1- The jigs

Part 1- The jigs

This is a re-post on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. I am a fan of “Cook Book” style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out. In addition, many of these photos/procedures have been refined over time and I will try to point them out by adding extra photos rather than rewriting the entire blog. I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the

lew

lew

How I got this started

How I got this started

Where to start is to determine just what do you want to use the bench for. At the time for me it was flatwork and planing. I looked at many plans and decided on parts of several. Not sure where each part came from but the contributing plans were in Wood Magazine, Shop Notes and Popular Mechanics.   I started with the vices. Both are Lee Valley and maybe even paid full price. They are both front vices but one is mounted on the end. Next is to decide on the wood. I wanted White Oak and i

Gerald

Gerald

 

Make your own blast gates and add ons

Ok finally got a little time to continue. First lets talk about blast gates and routing boxes. I made these from plans in either Wood magazine or Shop Notes but did not write the issue on it. This gate is for individual tools or can be mounted in the duct . Basically this one is ply for sides and 1/8 masonite scrap for the blade. The plastic PVC connector is a piece of thinwall with about 1/2 inch cut out and then use PVC glue. This will allow the 4 inch flex to be attached.This could

Gerald

Gerald

Ducts and blast gates

Ducts and blast gates

Now this may be getting the cart before the horse but lets call it collecting supplies you will need to connect your DC to machines. Thin wall PVC will work just fine . For the best you can order metal ducts any size you want but you will also have to buy expensive connections .   A consideration many people talk about is grounding the dust collector and duct. To my knowledge and every forum I have been on and every article and book "there has never been a explosion in a home workshop

Gerald

Gerald

What my current setup is

What my current setup is

Thought it might be best to start off with what my current setup is or at least parts of it. My Dust collector  is a Grizzly 1029 2 hp operating on 220v. It had a 5 micron bag top and bottom when purchased and was upgraded to a canister filter from Penn State. My collector is located in the attic of my shop in a insulated enclosure and a 12x24 filtered return to the shop. Power is controlled with a Long RAnger remote.    Ducting I used is 4 inch thinwall PVC. We will get into ducting a

Gerald

Gerald

 

Let's burn stuff!

So, I'm new to the site but I figured out that there is this nifty little blog feature.    I am a pyrographer. I burn designs into wood. It's amazing how relaxing it can be to create something so beautiful from something so potentially chaotic. Currently my works have been patriotic or pagan in genre. Eventually, as I gain more skill, I will branch into others as well.    I am more than happy to help answer any questions, to help you find the tools, etc.   

MaDeuce

MaDeuce

 

Its been shown before but still questions

this is not the same box but is the way I start building one.   I have to print out 10 exact patterns. The tenth one is just solid with no holes for drawers.     All the pieces  I cut out for the drawers are later glued together except for the front of the drawer and the back of the drawer. I use dowels to line up everything . If I don't use the dowels when clamping two pieces together it could slip just a hair one way or the other and cause lots of extra sanding or cause for the

Smallpatch

Smallpatch

If you have a printer

If you have a printer

I ran across this picture and thought some who use patterns they buy with money, you just might save a few bucks.  I noticed home printers are getting about the price of a big hamburger so that shouldn't slow too many away from one.. I don't know how much the Rapid Resizer cost to have on your computer but it is sure helpful when needing to enlarge or reduce a picture to be used as a pattern...    This is the pattern that got me to carving wood and the patterns or I should say one pattern I

Smallpatch

Smallpatch

 

Bed from a (few) boards

Have to start with a glue up . Did not think I could find 6 x 6 dry pine so here we go with 3 pieces of 2 x 6. Tried to get the knots toward the surface outer edges as these would be turned off. Remember you can never have too many clamps                                     After squaring the blanks on table saw we will need a centered hole to assemble the two parts of the post as this lathe is not lon

Gerald

Gerald

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