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Found 104 results

  1. Here is another oak hollow form with black and orange dye. Was supposed to have a collar but it warped too much so opened the top a little. It is about 4 inches in diameter.
  2. Ron Dudelston

    small lecterns

    From the album: Lecterns and Podiums

  3. From the album: John's Shop

    I recently inherited this beautiful workbench. The top is 4" thick, 6.5' long by 24" wide with a tool well at the rear. The top is composed of Maple and Oak billets, there are dog holes and the original owner made his own dogs out of aluminum rounds, they work very well. The end vise is large and very powerful. The cabinet is made of oak, with oak drawers and walnut pulls. I will be using the bench as my primary work surface for all I do, I cannot wait to start work on it. I purchased the hold fasts from a fellow on ebay, he hand forges them and sells them at a very reasonable price. I have already tried them and they truly do hold fast! More than likely I will remove the surface mounted vise as it will be in my way, but it is a nice vise, I'll mount it elsewhere in my shop space.
  4. Ron Dudelston

    Podium Front

    From the album: Lecterns and Podiums

    The verbiage was cut in with a Carvewright. Red oak laminated over walnut.
  5. friend of mine is into that Black Powder stuff. He had a jig, to hold a revolver steady so he could reload it. he had this thing.. The butt of the grips sit into the gouge area...just doesn't sit in tightly, was cut at the wrong angle...Felt area... Is where the cylinder sits, with the hammer at half-cock....only..the hammer won't go that far...makes it hard to rotate the cylinder. hinge wasn't done the best, either. Bought some 3/4" x 4" x 24" White Oak..some new hinges, and a set of Dremel bits... Bandsaw to cut 2 pieces. Blade has way too much set...need to plane the rough edges.."shooting Board & plane? Not exactly. Stanley No. 3c. test fit the two parts.. Will do, for a start..set up the Dremel with a cutting disc..and, once I located where the cut needed to go.. I cut a line straight down. Old one was at an angle. Move the pattern out of the way, grab a gouge and a hammer.. Chop out the waste. Then lay out for the hinge's location.. To match the old one's location. Chop a recess... Make sure it fits... mark the locations of the screws.. Start a hole for the drill to follow ( they tend to wander a bit).. Drill a couple pilot holes...and.. wax the screws up, and grab a screwdriver. Laid out the other cut, and rough cut it to shape.. Not attached, yet. need to adjust to fit the revolver better, when Mr. Bishop stops by tomorrow afternoon...he can add his own felt, once the jig is stained and finished,, I even tried to match the grain to the old jig....hope it works like he wants it to... stay tuned
  6. Our local Elks lodge recently did a minor renovation to their kitchen and waitress area. Part of that renovation was the construction of five new cabinets to blend in with their existing units. Today, I’ll deliver the final base unit that will be installed in the waitress area. I’m pretty sick of building cabinets right now.
  7. Boy these Cornhole games sure are popular. Our neighbor's daughter is getting married this May and they asked me if I could build a couple Cornhole boards for them, they are going to have games at the wedding reception. I only first heard of this game because of @John Moody, John is the resident Cornhole builder in our community. So I know what little I do know by John's work, and I just scanned the internet really quick to get the regulation sizes of everything and I set to building their boards from wood I had left over from other projects. I have not had a full day in the shop in two years, really, no kidding, life has been quite a challenge and I was so happy to just get this day to make some dust on such a basic project, I loved it. I had my folk music going in the shop, a little bit of Johnny Cash, some Del McCoury and Bill Monroe, and tapered the day off with Hank and Waylon, man what a joyous day. It was just one of those days that lined up perfectly to do some "me" time and the family was completely ok with it. Also, I got to really get into my Shopsmith! And what a blast I had with it. So, I know they are just Cornhole boards, but what's more important, is that I had a day of fun, so if you want to see some boards, read on! I set up my outfeed table configuration to handle some mid size panels for the Cornhole boards. Ripped a couple pre-prefinished 3/4" panels I had left over from a prior project, I am getting used to my Shopsmith today. I then set up my outfeed table to handle ripping some narrow boards, the table needs to be set at the center of the table saw or in line with the blade, it was a quick operation, part of using these Shopsmith's is knowing what they are capable of, and how to maximize their ability, I am not there yet, I am only discovering the surface of what these machines are capable of. I pushed the oak boards through with minimal effort. Then I joined each board just to clean up the edges and to have a nice mating edge to the underside of the surface board. I need to align my Shopsmith fence as you can see a tad burning on the oak edge. I have not adjusted my Shopsmith yet since I purchased it, the gent I bought it from had it sitting in his garage for 15 years with no use, so no doubt I need to tune up the alignment. I have however oiled the sheeves and other areas and I tensioned the drive belt to specs before I used it. I used good ol pocket holes to mount the sides of the boards up to the surface board. I drilled out all my pocket holes first. Then I set to screwing the boards to the underside of the Cornhole deck. I swear Shopsmith and Rigid have a secret relationship, because my Rigid Shopvac hose is the perfect size for the table saw dust port, and the jointer dust port. I cut a small radius on the end of the back cornhole board legs, so they'll fold up and down easily. This bandsaw is really nice, I can't believe how something small and seemingly very simple in design, is so accurate and easy to use. I aint kidding folks, I like it better than my 15" Grizz I had. A very strong feature of the Shopsmith is the Drill Press operation, it's sweet, I like it, I am happy. Quiet, accurate, with an adjustable table for in and out, and up and down and of course since the power head operates the Drill Press, it's variable speed. Drilling the holes out for the carriage bolts. The back folding legs are mounted, you flip them up and lock them down by tightening the wingnuts, I used a 5/16" carriage bolt, washer and wingnut. Legs up. I still have to cut out the 6" diameter Cornholes, but mission basically accomplished. Our neighbors should like them, she is going to paint a mural on the deck of the Cornhole board, I think the LA Dodgers symbol. Any my baby put to sleep, she did well today, I was please with the operations, and I became more efficient at the changeovers, I am getting good at operating my Shopsmith, and it's turned out to be a great machine for my purpose, and, mama gets to park her car in the garage now! I hope John Moody approves of the way I made these boards, and if anyone has any tips on the building Cornhole boards I am all ears, I may do some for my family as well, not sure yet, depends if the kids want them or not. If you want to build your own boards, here is the site that John Moody directed me too, they have all the information and specs for them there. https://www.playcornhole.org/ Thanks for sharing a part of my day with me folks.
  8. I figure pi day will be a great day to talk to about pie safes. My wife has been wanting one and she likes this one that used to belong to my Grandma. It has seen better days so I thought I would try to recreate it using some wood from an oak tree that was downed by hurricane Katrina. This will be my first major woodworking project. I intend to reuse as much of the original hardware as I can. All i have to do is get some measurements, mill some lumber, figure out the joinery, and find some time to get it done.
  9. Gerald

    Spalted box

    Finished this box today. The bottom was not two piece till I turned the bottom off . So I added a stand. Box is spalted white oak and lid is spalted pecan. The finish is lacquer buffed with Maguires buffing cpd and then polish.
  10. As I stated in my PC build located in the link below I'll be building a Desk/Cabinet for the PC. I'll be repurposing a "White Clad" Ice Box type end table/night stand like the one below as the base for this Desk/Cabinet. The photo is of one listed on ebay, I have to go down to my storage tomorrow and get the one I have. It is in a bit rougher shape than the one in this photo. I'll be doing this up similar to a Secretary Desk with an upper section that will house the monitor. I'll be using parts from one of those Oak Toilet Toppers along with other bits and pieces along the way. I don't work from any plans, simply just wing it, and figure this will look good here, that will look good there etc. I've also got some real neat cast Brass Brackets that will get incorporated into this build. I've been working on what will be the top (Monitor) door along with the PC build to get this started. Here are a couple of photos of the door before I got started on it. It is the worst shape piece of this build, but it came from a junked "White Clad" cart, and matches the door on the "Ice Box" These are some really cheaply built doors in that the frames are simply attached to a 1/8" plywood back which also serves as the door panels. The veneer on this door is in real poor shape, but the plywood is still rather solid. Below are a few photos of the door as work progresses on it. This is an edge photo of the door you might be able to make out the plywood back. The frame members on these doors are not spliced together in any way, and I added braces to the rear side of the door to keep it stiff, and straight. the edges kept wanting to bend away from being straight with the other frame members. The door is looking much better then when I started with it. Almost half of the veneer has flaked away, and I'm not sure if I'll re veneer it, or cover it with some Plexiglass Mirror that I have. That's about it for today on this build. Until next time.
  11. I'm curious if seasoned oak firewood (obviously would need to be cut appropriately) would be usable for wood burning (other than camp fires).
  12. Over the years I have carved many things using the bandsaw for 90% of the work. The rotary tool is the only other tool I used. I selected two types of Oak for color and texture. (Don't know the names) It will be a Christmas gift. I made the eyes 8 times using different size Forstner drills. Some split and some just didn't look good.
  13. Hey, it beats throwing the scraps out into the firepit. Have been resawing some of the thicker scraps.. Trying to keep these flat. Crosscut a few other pieces, jointed a few edges, spread some glue around.. 3 pieces for this panel glue up, and.. 3 more pieces to make this one...will let these sit awhile...may start trimming some frame parts .. Have to rip these down to all the same width. Will leave them a tad wide, to make groove making easier. End panels? Thinking I can get 2 end panels out of the longer board...."shorty" is for "Plan B"... Lid? Underneath all the Poplar and other goodies...lies a 1 x 12 Oak scrap....May just use it as a lid? Just waiting on the glue to cure...while I pick the dried stuff off me fingers... Stay tuned.
  14. steven newman

    case

    From the album: Microwave Stand

    A view of the lower storage area, with the doors opened.
  15. steven newman

    dovetails

    From the album: Microwave Stand

    Fancy, hand-cut Dovetail joint, for the front of the drawer.
  16. steven newman

    front view

    From the album: Microwave Stand

    Drawer and door details.
  17. steven newman

    Side view

    From the album: Microwave Stand

    After it arrived in the kitchen
  18. steven newman

    PIP

    From the album: Microwave Stand

    Before the stain and finish was applied
  19. Doing a little art/craft show this weekend. That will make three for me this year, definitely have to cut back next year!! Anyway, trying to get a few pieces done to display. This maple bowl is one of them. This bowl was turned to finish green and has a nice little warp to it. Don't know why but people seem to like that. It is 17.5" diameter at it's widest point. Both of these bowls still need buffed. The bottom A little natural edge white oak bowl, I think it's interesting how spalted is the sap wood but the heart wood is solid as a rock. The bark was toast on this one before it was turned at all. This bowl is actually one from the class with Glenn Lucas last week. The lesson was on turning natural edge but also centering and balancing the bowl with the grain and getting clean cuts. About 15 minutes sanding on this one, which is cray, cray, for me. The bottom. Have shied away from turning oak, just never thought I would like it, this particular piece of wood was great to work with, cut like butter with little tear out. Steve
  20. One of the bowls we did last week with Glenn Lucas was a milk paint bowl. The technique works best with an open grain wood like ash or oak. The bowl is turned close to finish and then wire brushed to open the grain. After brushing it gets painted with milk paint. After painting the final details are cut, in this case, the rim and the bead. It's a neat effect I think but probably not for everyone. We also talked about form and balancing the grain in a bowl. Form is not perfect on this one, I can see a little flat spot in it. A guy like Glenn considers nuances and details most of us never would. Anyway, I wanted to do something on the bottom so I didn't finish mine until I got home. It is finished with mineral oil and beeswax. Steve
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