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Found 244 results

  1. Oiled up a couple bowls this morning. First is a natural edge walnut bowl not quite 14" diameter. This is a pretty big bowl, almost 6" deep. It has a really heavy bark layer on it. Next is a maple bowl about 13". This bowl is kind of like that toxic relationship everyone has had at some time or another. You know you should just walk away from it and cut your losses but just keep investing time and effort into making it work. This bowl cracked and then cracked some more. Carved out the cracks and filled them with alumilite casting resin and copper powder. If not for the really nice grain in it, it would've been toast(literally). First time working with the casting resin and I can see more of that in my future. Steve
  2. Just in time for Christmas. These were a labor of love and I'm really happy how they finished up. Even so, I am so-o-o-o glad they are done. 8 cryptex boxes for the grand kids. I have no delusions about how the boxes will compare to the fancy electronic gadgets kids want these days, but maybe one day they'll be appreciated. I think I posted in progress pictures of these a while back but not sure. I actually started them in the summer but shelved them until closer to Christmas. Last week, I decided I needed another, really had to scratch to remember how I'd done everything, even had to go back and watch Carl Jacobson's excellent video on making them again. The code on each one is their birth day with "Z"=zero and "A"=1 etc. Steve
  3. Thought I would share a fun project I did several years back. Hope you enjoy. Step One: Cut walnut and ash stock into small squares, 12 walnut, 20 ash. Step Two: Drill holes using jigs to insure accuracy - different jig for walnut and ash pieces. Step Three: Set up table saw to cut at proper angle and cut all walnut pieces into pentagon shape. Step Four: Reset table saw to cut hexagons at proper angle and cut all ash pieces. Step Five: Make several extra pieces in case you mess one up later. Step Six: Make sure you have a friend to drink beer and watch while you're working. Step Seven: Glue and tape. Step Eight: Relax, watch the glue dry. Step Nine: Remove tape, light sanding, wax your ball and close up shop for the night. Step Ten: Do it again the following day using tape to minimize tearout. Step Eleven: Give the best of the two to your soccer star daughter for her 13th birthday and keep the other for yourself.
  4. lew

    Mostly Sanded

    From the album: Honey Dipper

    sanded on lathe. Needs to have each end sanded where parting took place.

    © Lewis Kauffman

  5. Got to start somewhere. Breaking down a couple of 4/4 x6 x8' Walnut planks. Cut a few down to match the raised panels I made a while back. Cleaned up the rough sawn edges a bit, and marked them for a rip cut. After a rip down the middle, these will go on the ends, to house them raised panels. Going to get these to a somewhat finished sized, and then smooth the faces up. Less to plane, that way. Tried to handsaw these boards down, ran out of breath ( COPD??) so an OLD Sears Craftsman Circular saw was used. It will also do all the rip cuts. Corner posts were straight edged up. Then set up for a rip down the middle. I'll then add a Tongue & groove joint to the edges of the corner posts.
  6. Hi Everyone I was asked to create a special keepsake chest for a couple in memory of their first child. The chest is made from Peruvian Walnut and measures 28 x 16 x 10. The Memorial Plaque is made from Holly and laser engraved. Although I had to learn a few new techniques in the construction of this project I can’t say this was a fun project.
  7. Dadio

    TP Dispenser

    This is my first real Scrollsaw project. I found a picture on the internet of one I liked so I sort of copied it. The bolt/washer/nut was my idea, the one I copied had a dowel with a ball on the end. Made from Black Walnut. Herb
  8. Maple and walnut. 24" tall 15" wide and 7" deep. All joints are M&T. Sanded to 180, 3 coats of matte poly, each roughed with a white mesh pad and final finish rubbed out with Liberon #0000 SW and paste wax. Drawers are lined with the same purple felt as the wings. Wrapped cereal box card board and dropped it in and glued them. Top drawer is fitted with ring holders. A piece of 3/8 thick dense foam with knife silts. The felt was laid over the top and slid into the slits with a steel ruler. The dot is a 3/8 rare earth magnet that catches the metal piece robbed from a push-to-open magnetic catch. The wings for studs and pins are felt covered M&T frames. Four per side. They swivel on 1/8" by 1/2" brass pins. Wife and I had to align all 8 to holes in the top at the same time and, then fit the top on the tenons cut in the sides and the dado for the back. Took us well over an hour. The top is screwed on and the screws counter bores are covered with walnut pegs from Rockler. Not shown are six 1" long brass pegs across the inside top, behind the wings, for necklaces. This was one major PITA for me. But, I learned a number of new techniques, learned some new combinations of cuss words, built a few jigs and best of all, bought a couple new planes needed to complete it. I'm sure the next three will be easier.(Fingers crossed!!!!)
  9. DAB

    Three bowls

    finished the last of these today. will be given away next saturday.
  10. Was playing around a little today and thought I'd try something new. I had a little walnut crotch that was really to small to do much so I thought I'd try to turn a thin, natural edge, winged bowl just for fun. Have always wanted to try something like this but didn't really know where to start. It actually went better than I expected and even though I could see some sanding in my future I was pretty happy with what was emerging. The bowl was coming along nicely and I was really happy with the thickness. Was cleaning up around the bottom of the bowl, lost concentration for just an instant and nicked the bowl with the tool. Dohhh, pay attention!! Still, it was fun, I learned, and the next one will be better. Like professor Moody says "constant vigilance!!" Steve
  11. From the album: John's Shop

    I recently inherited this beautiful workbench. The top is 4" thick, 6.5' long by 24" wide with a tool well at the rear. The top is composed of Maple and Oak billets, there are dog holes and the original owner made his own dogs out of aluminum rounds, they work very well. The end vise is large and very powerful. The cabinet is made of oak, with oak drawers and walnut pulls. I will be using the bench as my primary work surface for all I do, I cannot wait to start work on it. I purchased the hold fasts from a fellow on ebay, he hand forges them and sells them at a very reasonable price. I have already tried them and they truly do hold fast! More than likely I will remove the surface mounted vise as it will be in my way, but it is a nice vise, I'll mount it elsewhere in my shop space.
  12. I bought some really nice walnut on eBay. The grade is S4S, 3/4" thick, 7 1/2" wide, and 4' long. I little bit of it has some nice grain. I paid $7.24 a BF including shipping. I think I got a fair deal but I don't really know. The last walnut I bought was $5.35 a BF and it was steamed and quite frankly it looked like you know what. I am having to stain this walnut to get it to look like walnut. That is a bummer. https://www.ebay.com/sch/shutrbug3/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=
  13. Turned these for the lady and her daughter who own the local honey farm that sells my mason jar honey dippers. They have been good customers and a pleasure to deal with. The top finial on these is supposed to be a bee hive and the drop is supposed to look like a honey dipper. Not exactly sure if I'm all that happy with the shape. Love the idea and concept and I think they will too. Maple and walnut, two of my favorite woods to pair. Steve
  14. Well, I was going to post this last night after we got to our son and daughter in law's new house that they just moved into, but I had to help my son put together the new sofa/bed that Tami and I were going to sleep on. We got done after midnight so I figured that it would have to wait until this morning. In Part 2 of this project of making a Cedar Lined Walnut Blanket Chest for Nori, my first grand daughter that will be born this coming November, John Moody, Ron Dudelston and I were all at John Moody's house to hang out for a few days and we were building this chest together in John Moody's shop. In the first post on this project we got all the lumber milled down and got the panels glued up. So in this post we got all the panels sanded down and cut to final dimensions, cut and dry fit the dovetail joints, cut and fit the plywood bottom, glued up the chest, rough sanded the chest, routed the top, attached the top, and milled the cedar boards that will line the inside of the chest. It took a lot more sanding than we planned on the panels as we got some bowing in the glue ups which cost us extra time over our short weekend together. But we finally got everything down to the right thicknesses and got the dovetails cut. Here are John and Ron as we were working on the dry fit. Those dovetails turned out great! John has the Dovetail Jig from Peachtree Woodworking and it was really easy to do. After getting the birch plywood bottom notched and fitted into the dadoes and making sure that it wall perfectly square, it was time to get it glued up. Taping the inside corners with the Blue Painter's Tape sure was a time/work saver to deal with the squeeze out during the clamping. I can't tell you how many times John told Ron and I during this build "Don't ask me how I know this, but we need to do/not do ___________ or it will mess up the chest." Since he has made quite a few blanket chests his experience and wisdom was great to have. After letting the glue dry overnight, we got up early on Monday morning to get as much done as possible before Ron and I had to head back up north to Indiana. Ron got all the dovetail joints sanded down flush and they all look great! After getting the rough sanding done, we did the measurements and cut and routed the decorative edge on the top and then mounted the top using 3 of the Rockler chest hinges. We had hoped to get more of the chest done, but ran out of time to get the bottom trim and lining the inside with the cedar and do the final sanding. So Ron will do the final sanding and I will head up there later this week and we finish the trim and cedar lining at in his shop. After that I will be taking it to my kid's house and putting a few coats of a wipe on oil/varnish finish before Tami and I head back home to California. I had a great time working with John and Ron on this project. We were all worn out as it was a lot of work to get done over a weekend, but it turned out great. Before we blew off all the dust and carried it out to Ron's van, the last thing was to get John and Ron's signatures on the bottom in permanent ink so Nori will know how much love was put into this chest. Once I get the final finish on I will post some more photos. Here is photo of all of us at the Moody's before Ron, Dorothy, Tami and I headed back to Indiana.
  15. Our club meets this Sunday and I am doing the demo. Have decided on a fairly simple project from a video by Steve Jones . A seed starter pot maker. Many club members don't do demos and don't realize what goes into preparing for one. The demo I'm doing is "skew heavy". Steve Jones is a production turner from England the best I've ever seen with a skew. Even though I'm fairly adept with a skew I can't hold a candle to Steve. Even so, I want to do the demo using as many of his techniques as possible. With that in mind I have turned several pieces to get it down. This is maybe half of the ones I've done for practice. Add to that, transporting tools, materials, making notes, rehearsing, etc. etc. and doing a demo is a significant commitment in time and effort. On the other hand, I truly believe, the person doing the demo learns much more than anyone who watches it and the benefits far out weigh the inconveniences. Steve
  16. Someone in one my FB groups posted a picture of a "skeleton" clock. I didn't know what that was until after I did some research. I guess all it means is that a person can see the gears. The one I saw was on a pedestal and it was very nice looking. I need a demo for June and had a little different vision for one. When I do a demo I will make several of an item to make I have it down. So far I've made four of these, no pictures of the first one. It was just to figure out dimensions and diameters. Let me know what you honestly think please. This is the second I did, it is very simple and very basic, I actually kind of like the front view of this one. It is made from a piece of 8/4 walnut as about 1 1/8 thickness is needed to hide the back of the clock. This is a perspective view and it just doesn't work IMO. The brass trim ring looks huge on this one. You probably noticed there is no foot. There isn't a foot on any of these. My vision is for the clock to sit on a high shelf or fireplace mantle and kind of rise out of the surface. This is the next one, it is white oak and walnut. I have always liked the way those two woods look together. IMO, the walnut feature ring is just too small and is hard to see. On all of the clocks it's hard to see the hands from any distance but I think that's the movement itself. Persepective on the walnut and white oak clock, definitely looks better in the front view. This one is a little heavy on the front too. it would be okay on a mantle or high shelf but on a table it would tip over if bumped. This is the last one I've done and the best one I think. It is hickory and walnut. I like the white oak and walnut better but the walnut ring is better on this one I think. For what it's worth, it's the same movement in all three. It just presses into a 2 3/4" diameter hole. You can tell in this one how hard are the hands to see. Perspective on the last one. Let me know what you think, not sure about the look and maybe a foot will be necessary. Steve
  17. lew

    Honey Garlic with finish

    From the album: Honey Dipper

    Honey dippers made of walnut and maple. Garlic crackers made of walnut. Mineral oil finish.

    © Lewis Kauffman

  18. Our woodturning club had an exchange challenge today. The idea is that members bring something they have turned, and exchange it with another member for something they have turned. I made a paper clip bowl out of maple and walnut. In the bottom are three rare earth magnets to keep the paper clips in the bowl as it gets slid around on the desk top. This turned out to be one of my learning experiences, aka mistakes, as I figured out halfway into the turning that I couldn't make a small bowl with a traditional curved bottom with a large chuck. Thus, the flared out bottom. Anyway, here's my project. Thanks for looking.
  19. Well I picked up some wood today from an estate sale that had been stored for over 20 years is dry storage. I have to plane it to be sure ,but I think there is some usable stuff in there. Some Black Walnut,Aromatic Cedar, Red Alder, Spalted Alder, Dogwood. Herb
  20. This is the second cryptex I've finished. I re wrote the border file and I like this look much better. This one is a five ring code as I'm going to use it for the demo at our next meeting of the NorthEast Indiana Turners and Chiselers(NEITC). Anyone care to guess what is the code?? The first one actually works smoother, I didn't dry fit the rings before gluing it up and I should have. Oh well, someone said in another thread, it's how we grow. Steve
  21. Yesterday, I got all the olive planed and dimensioned for the case pieces. Today, it the walnut and maple's turn. The walnut is really rough, twisted and/or cupped. I'm using a sled that I built in' 06 that was featured in FWW. Here is a link to a video of how it's made. It works very well. But, it's a heavy beast. Especially with a 5' long 10" wide 4/4 board on it. Several passes @1/32 have been necessary to get one flat side. Tires me out. Luckily, the maple is already flat. This case will be different than the last one. The lid and bottom will be oversized glued up slabs with bread board ends...At least that's the plan, now. They'll extend about 3/4" at each end and somewhere around 1 1/2" in front. Those parts will be curved from the mid point to each end. Designing on the fly is fraught with danger but, oh so much more fun. Once the pieces are all cut and assembled for a dry fit, I'll get some pics.
  22. One Christmas I made a bunch of Walnut veneer scrapbooks.
  23. Here is my latest effort. This is the bowl that was in work when I posted the pictures of the curtain and dust trough on my lathe. Top and bottom are poplar, center is walnut. I wanted to try my hand at mixing species. I don't really like this one, the proportions look wrong to me. My son and DIL like it, so it's theirs now.

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