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Found 256 results

  1. My son approached me last month and asked if we could build a desk for his bedroom for this upcoming school year, he is planning on a ton of homework and being in 10th grade and all, the work is going to get harder and harder. He asked me to help him build the desk just before I went into the hospital back in early June, I was in bad shape for the first few weeks coming out of the hospital and meanwhile he was asking me when we can start the desk, bless his little soul and heart, as crappy as I was feeling, he felt that ol Dad could get up and go and power through it all with a desk build. I had to put it off, with the way I was feeling, it wasn't even safe for me to be out there in the shop, and the fact that he asked me during that time period, and asked a few more times, indicates I was putting on a pretty positive attitude show for the family, despite how I was feeling. So, now that I am feeling pretty ok, much better than before, me and the boy went to the lumber yard and picked up a few cherry boards. The desk will be cherry, with walnut legs, he wanted two tone. Actually he wanted a Walnut desk, but once we got to the yard, the walnut was just too expensive, so he came around to cherry. We have a budget and we needed to stay within. And it so happens that I had some left over walnut so we'll incorporate the walnut into the mainly cherry desk somehow, thinking possibly the legs will be walnut. I had my boy rip down the boards on the Shopsmith, he did pretty good, burned the cherry on one edge and I then I took the second board and showed him how to use moderate steady feed rate and also keeping it against the fence. Once we had the boards sized, we chose one edge to join, the boards will be cut in half, and folded against each-other and glued edge to edge. I showed my son Jeroid how to handle the big No. 8C, he knows how mostly as he worked with me often years ago, but many years have gone by since he's been by my side in the shop, so picking up the plane again took some practice, fortunately we left the board wide by an 1/8" because I knew Jeroid was going to need practice room to get the edge right. Jeroid took a few passes on the edge and did pretty good, he had a few issues keeping the plane in constant contact with the edge, but he figured it out, I just stood back and let him error, and figure it out. He did. He really got the hang of it, and started to enjoy the process. By the last couple passes he had some shavings singing from the plane, I could tell he felt really good about what he was doing. The edge did get a little off, so I showed him how to get back to 90 with a little lateral adjustment of the plane iron, and he brought it back to square in about 4 or 5 passes. After he joined the boards, we cut them down and glued them up, that is where we are at right now, we have two desk ends, next we'll get the inner dividers joined and glued up. Thanks for reading along, seeya all next time!
  2. My Mom is 91 (this past Monday) and she still sews and makes clothes. I noticed she had an the same seam ripper for years so I thought I'd make her a new one for Christmas- but it turned out to be a birthday gift. However when making one it's just as easy to make two so the other one will be for my sister for Christmas. I bought the kits from Craft Supplies because I needed some other stuff that I can only find at their site. Making the rippers is pretty straight forward, especially if you turn pens. I had some walnut pen blanks I found in a box of scraps. Drilled them with the proper sized bit using the lathe. One trick when drilling pen blanks is to not drill the hole completely thru the blank. Using a brad point bit will have the point punch thru before the bit actually exits the blank. This process keeps the blank from being blown out when the bit would exit. Once the brass tube is glued into place, the end of the blank can be trimmed near the tube- I trimmed mine on the band saw. Then used the sanding center to bring the wooden blank flush with the brass tube on each end. I planned on doing a CA finish on these. To keep the CA from gluing the bushings to the blank/tubing I apply a coating of bumble bee butter to the bushings. Then mounted the blank and bushing to the pen mandrel. Then the assembly on to the lathe Rounded the blank with a roughing gouge Shaped with the skew Sanded the blank to 400 with Abranet mesh to 400 and finished off with Abralon pads to 4000. Applied some sanding sealer. Then about 40 layers of thin CA- Assembled the parts with my shop made pen press One gold and one silver I still have a bunch of wooden scoops to turn for the nurses at my doctor's office and a few other people.
  3. My wife and a good friend have a birthday coming soon and I wanted to make them something different/special. The 3/8” thick tray sides are splayed 20 degrees with box joints. The splayed box joints are inspired from a project in a 2009 Woodsmith magazine. The woods are walnut and cherry. The finish is (1) coat BLO and (2) coats clear shellac. Thanks for looking. Danl
  4. Do you have a special pencil which you use to put layout lines on dark wood like walnut? Danl
  5. From the album: John's Shop

    I recently inherited this beautiful workbench. The top is 4" thick, 6.5' long by 24" wide with a tool well at the rear. The top is composed of Maple and Oak billets, there are dog holes and the original owner made his own dogs out of aluminum rounds, they work very well. The end vise is large and very powerful. The cabinet is made of oak, with oak drawers and walnut pulls. I will be using the bench as my primary work surface for all I do, I cannot wait to start work on it. I purchased the hold fasts from a fellow on ebay, he hand forges them and sells them at a very reasonable price. I have already tried them and they truly do hold fast! More than likely I will remove the surface mounted vise as it will be in my way, but it is a nice vise, I'll mount it elsewhere in my shop space.
  6. Ron Dudelston

    Podium Front

    From the album: Lecterns and Podiums

    The verbiage was cut in with a Carvewright. Red oak laminated over walnut.
  7. From the album: John Morris's Hand Tools

    I built this square from left over Walnut from some project eons ago, and the Curly Maple is scrap from a Shaker Rocker I am currently building. The two pins are of Walnut as well. They are through-pins.
  8. From the album: John Morris's Hand Tools

    I got in the shop a little and decided to make my own layout tools, starting with the ever so useful 6" square. Since it's the most used size in my work, it's a good jumping off point. Then I'll create a smaller 3" followed up by a few larger squares. I love how this one feels, and you know what? No more accidental scratching or marring of wood surfaces like you may get with steel squares.
  9. Saturday morning turning on the back patio.... fun. Pretty piece of walnut 10" wide 2-1/2" deep. Happy with this one.
  10. Hi Everyone Here are a couple of photos of my newest commissioned knife block. Made from walnut with holly accents. 11.5" x 11.5" x 13" and weighs 26 LBS.
  11. Moving along with the demo prep. Have two sticks completed and my demo routine pretty will figured out. I have to make one more stick to leave in component form and then probably a few components in different stages of completion in case of a severe catch or other catastrophe. I'd forgotten what a nice project this stick is. These two will eventually be gifted to a soon to be retired neighbor and his wife. Bruce is a good friend, and more importantly, a licensed electrician . He and I have helped each other back and forth for 30 years or more. It's always a good thing for him to owe me a favor! once a few more coats of oil are applied, the sticks get a 3/4" rubber cane tip on the bottom.
  12. Several years ago, WOOD magazine did a project, a "wood turned walking stick". It didn't happen very often but this particular project just spoke to me and I had to make it. That's kind of funny because at the time, if I'm being honest, I couldn't really call myself a wood turner. My lathe was a shopsmith and I turned a spindle if I just had to. Anyway, I ended up making several of those walking sticks for gifts or personal use. I have decided to revisit the project and hit the highlights of it for the May demo for our club. It's a very straight forward thing to make except for the handle. I have a handle on the lathe, have turned it and done some shaping. Still a little more to do but it's coming along. Two things are different this time around. In the article, a compass is let into the handle with a cavity under it for matches, a map, or whatever. Those compasses are no longer available and I haven't been able to find a substitute so I'll just round the top. The other thing that's different is the EWT negative rake insert I now have in my arsenal. They are perfect for shaping the finger slots. Here's a WIP picture. Still some tweaking to do on this one but I'm happy with it to this point. The neat thing about this walking stick is, it's made in four pieces so a person doesn't need a real long bed to do it. One of the best WOOD projects ever IMO. Steve
  13. Have a current order for honey dippers, this is the first batch of 20 finished. Some of the these have some really nice grain in the lids. Steve
  14. Pictures are coming. Hold on.
  15. Oiled up a couple bowls this morning. First is a natural edge walnut bowl not quite 14" diameter. This is a pretty big bowl, almost 6" deep. It has a really heavy bark layer on it. Next is a maple bowl about 13". This bowl is kind of like that toxic relationship everyone has had at some time or another. You know you should just walk away from it and cut your losses but just keep investing time and effort into making it work. This bowl cracked and then cracked some more. Carved out the cracks and filled them with alumilite casting resin and copper powder. If not for the really nice grain in it, it would've been toast(literally). First time working with the casting resin and I can see more of that in my future. Steve
  16. Just in time for Christmas. These were a labor of love and I'm really happy how they finished up. Even so, I am so-o-o-o glad they are done. 8 cryptex boxes for the grand kids. I have no delusions about how the boxes will compare to the fancy electronic gadgets kids want these days, but maybe one day they'll be appreciated. I think I posted in progress pictures of these a while back but not sure. I actually started them in the summer but shelved them until closer to Christmas. Last week, I decided I needed another, really had to scratch to remember how I'd done everything, even had to go back and watch Carl Jacobson's excellent video on making them again. The code on each one is their birth day with "Z"=zero and "A"=1 etc. Steve
  17. Thought I would share a fun project I did several years back. Hope you enjoy. Step One: Cut walnut and ash stock into small squares, 12 walnut, 20 ash. Step Two: Drill holes using jigs to insure accuracy - different jig for walnut and ash pieces. Step Three: Set up table saw to cut at proper angle and cut all walnut pieces into pentagon shape. Step Four: Reset table saw to cut hexagons at proper angle and cut all ash pieces. Step Five: Make several extra pieces in case you mess one up later. Step Six: Make sure you have a friend to drink beer and watch while you're working. Step Seven: Glue and tape. Step Eight: Relax, watch the glue dry. Step Nine: Remove tape, light sanding, wax your ball and close up shop for the night. Step Ten: Do it again the following day using tape to minimize tearout. Step Eleven: Give the best of the two to your soccer star daughter for her 13th birthday and keep the other for yourself.
  18. lew

    Mostly Sanded

    From the album: Honey Dipper

    sanded on lathe. Needs to have each end sanded where parting took place.

    © Lewis Kauffman

  19. Got to start somewhere. Breaking down a couple of 4/4 x6 x8' Walnut planks. Cut a few down to match the raised panels I made a while back. Cleaned up the rough sawn edges a bit, and marked them for a rip cut. After a rip down the middle, these will go on the ends, to house them raised panels. Going to get these to a somewhat finished sized, and then smooth the faces up. Less to plane, that way. Tried to handsaw these boards down, ran out of breath ( COPD??) so an OLD Sears Craftsman Circular saw was used. It will also do all the rip cuts. Corner posts were straight edged up. Then set up for a rip down the middle. I'll then add a Tongue & groove joint to the edges of the corner posts.
  20. Hi Everyone I was asked to create a special keepsake chest for a couple in memory of their first child. The chest is made from Peruvian Walnut and measures 28 x 16 x 10. The Memorial Plaque is made from Holly and laser engraved. Although I had to learn a few new techniques in the construction of this project I can’t say this was a fun project.
  21. Dadio

    TP Dispenser

    This is my first real Scrollsaw project. I found a picture on the internet of one I liked so I sort of copied it. The bolt/washer/nut was my idea, the one I copied had a dowel with a ball on the end. Made from Black Walnut. Herb
  22. Maple and walnut. 24" tall 15" wide and 7" deep. All joints are M&T. Sanded to 180, 3 coats of matte poly, each roughed with a white mesh pad and final finish rubbed out with Liberon #0000 SW and paste wax. Drawers are lined with the same purple felt as the wings. Wrapped cereal box card board and dropped it in and glued them. Top drawer is fitted with ring holders. A piece of 3/8 thick dense foam with knife silts. The felt was laid over the top and slid into the slits with a steel ruler. The dot is a 3/8 rare earth magnet that catches the metal piece robbed from a push-to-open magnetic catch. The wings for studs and pins are felt covered M&T frames. Four per side. They swivel on 1/8" by 1/2" brass pins. Wife and I had to align all 8 to holes in the top at the same time and, then fit the top on the tenons cut in the sides and the dado for the back. Took us well over an hour. The top is screwed on and the screws counter bores are covered with walnut pegs from Rockler. Not shown are six 1" long brass pegs across the inside top, behind the wings, for necklaces. This was one major PITA for me. But, I learned a number of new techniques, learned some new combinations of cuss words, built a few jigs and best of all, bought a couple new planes needed to complete it. I'm sure the next three will be easier.(Fingers crossed!!!!)
  23. DAB

    Three bowls

    finished the last of these today. will be given away next saturday.
  24. Was playing around a little today and thought I'd try something new. I had a little walnut crotch that was really to small to do much so I thought I'd try to turn a thin, natural edge, winged bowl just for fun. Have always wanted to try something like this but didn't really know where to start. It actually went better than I expected and even though I could see some sanding in my future I was pretty happy with what was emerging. The bowl was coming along nicely and I was really happy with the thickness. Was cleaning up around the bottom of the bowl, lost concentration for just an instant and nicked the bowl with the tool. Dohhh, pay attention!! Still, it was fun, I learned, and the next one will be better. Like professor Moody says "constant vigilance!!" Steve
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