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Found 233 results

  1. Steve Krumanaker

    Skeleton Clocks

    Someone in one my FB groups posted a picture of a "skeleton" clock. I didn't know what that was until after I did some research. I guess all it means is that a person can see the gears. The one I saw was on a pedestal and it was very nice looking. I need a demo for June and had a little different vision for one. When I do a demo I will make several of an item to make I have it down. So far I've made four of these, no pictures of the first one. It was just to figure out dimensions and diameters. Let me know what you honestly think please. This is the second I did, it is very simple and very basic, I actually kind of like the front view of this one. It is made from a piece of 8/4 walnut as about 1 1/8 thickness is needed to hide the back of the clock. This is a perspective view and it just doesn't work IMO. The brass trim ring looks huge on this one. You probably noticed there is no foot. There isn't a foot on any of these. My vision is for the clock to sit on a high shelf or fireplace mantle and kind of rise out of the surface. This is the next one, it is white oak and walnut. I have always liked the way those two woods look together. IMO, the walnut feature ring is just too small and is hard to see. On all of the clocks it's hard to see the hands from any distance but I think that's the movement itself. Persepective on the walnut and white oak clock, definitely looks better in the front view. This one is a little heavy on the front too. it would be okay on a mantle or high shelf but on a table it would tip over if bumped. This is the last one I've done and the best one I think. It is hickory and walnut. I like the white oak and walnut better but the walnut ring is better on this one I think. For what it's worth, it's the same movement in all three. It just presses into a 2 3/4" diameter hole. You can tell in this one how hard are the hands to see. Perspective on the last one. Let me know what you think, not sure about the look and maybe a foot will be necessary. Steve
  2. lew

    Honey Garlic with finish

    From the album: Honey Dipper

    Honey dippers made of walnut and maple. Garlic crackers made of walnut. Mineral oil finish.

    © Lewis Kauffman

  3. Our woodturning club had an exchange challenge today. The idea is that members bring something they have turned, and exchange it with another member for something they have turned. I made a paper clip bowl out of maple and walnut. In the bottom are three rare earth magnets to keep the paper clips in the bowl as it gets slid around on the desk top. This turned out to be one of my learning experiences, aka mistakes, as I figured out halfway into the turning that I couldn't make a small bowl with a traditional curved bottom with a large chuck. Thus, the flared out bottom. Anyway, here's my project. Thanks for looking.
  4. Dadio

    Wood Stash

    Well I picked up some wood today from an estate sale that had been stored for over 20 years is dry storage. I have to plane it to be sure ,but I think there is some usable stuff in there. Some Black Walnut,Aromatic Cedar, Red Alder, Spalted Alder, Dogwood. Herb
  5. Steve Krumanaker

    The second cryptex

    This is the second cryptex I've finished. I re wrote the border file and I like this look much better. This one is a five ring code as I'm going to use it for the demo at our next meeting of the NorthEast Indiana Turners and Chiselers(NEITC). Anyone care to guess what is the code?? The first one actually works smoother, I didn't dry fit the rings before gluing it up and I should have. Oh well, someone said in another thread, it's how we grow. Steve
  6. John Morris

    Cherry Rocker Rear Leg to Seat Joint

    From the album: Cherry Rocker

  7. Gene Howe

    Rifle case # 2

    Yesterday, I got all the olive planed and dimensioned for the case pieces. Today, it the walnut and maple's turn. The walnut is really rough, twisted and/or cupped. I'm using a sled that I built in' 06 that was featured in FWW. Here is a link to a video of how it's made. It works very well. But, it's a heavy beast. Especially with a 5' long 10" wide 4/4 board on it. Several passes @1/32 have been necessary to get one flat side. Tires me out. Luckily, the maple is already flat. This case will be different than the last one. The lid and bottom will be oversized glued up slabs with bread board ends...At least that's the plan, now. They'll extend about 3/4" at each end and somewhere around 1 1/2" in front. Those parts will be curved from the mid point to each end. Designing on the fly is fraught with danger but, oh so much more fun. Once the pieces are all cut and assembled for a dry fit, I'll get some pics.
  8. One Christmas I made a bunch of Walnut veneer scrapbooks.
  9. PostalTom

    Newest Bowl

    Here is my latest effort. This is the bowl that was in work when I posted the pictures of the curtain and dust trough on my lathe. Top and bottom are poplar, center is walnut. I wanted to try my hand at mixing species. I don't really like this one, the proportions look wrong to me. My son and DIL like it, so it's theirs now.
  10. Steve Krumanaker

    Back to the natural walnut bowls

    I've still got several of the natural edge walnut bowls to finish. Took this one in the house today. It's about 12" diameter and 6" deep. I burned one of my favorite zentangle patterns on the bottom, "phicops in a circle". Steve Steve
  11. Steve Krumanaker

    1st cryptex, rough

    This is my first cryptex and what a learning experience. It's really a pretty simple thing to make but dimensions are critical. I expect it will take two or three more before I get any I can use for gifts. I have to say I am thrilled at how well the rotary engraver worked once I got the pattern and spacing figured out. The rings have the alphabet on them but the code for each grand kid will be their birthday as it corresponds to the letters of the alphabet, won't tell them at first and see if one of them figures it out. I don't think they can guess it out as there are about 3 million combinations possible. I wasn't sure how long to make the barrels so I had to trim them off on the band saw, shouldn't be a problem on the next ones. From what I understand, these devices were used to transport sensitive messages. Supposedly the message would be written on parchment and a glass vial of vinegar was placed in with the message. A person couldn't break into the cryptex without breaking the vial which would dissolve the parchment. I don't know if all that's true but it makes a good story and these are kind of neat I think. FWIW, Carl Jacobson has three videos on making one of these and that's where I got the idea. Steve
  12. Courtland

    Walnut Rocker Front View

    From the album: Walnut Rocking Chair

    The seat is really fun to shape in these rockers, you get to make a ton of sawdust!
  13. Steve Krumanaker

    Wood turning clubs.

    I'm going to say this about three times but this bowl is NOT MY WORK!! Often when a new wood turner is asking for advice someone will recommend joining a club. I've said myself there is nothing better a new turner can do to learn than join a wood turning club. After our meeting today I have to amend that and say there is nothing better any turner can do to learn than join a wood turning club. Today I saw one of the most creative pieces of work I've ever seen, from a guy that's only been turning about two years I think. Once again, this is not my work but one of our club members. He rough turned a walnut bowl that had a big knot in the side. When he finished turned the bowl, the knot deteriorated and left a big hole. His fix was inspirational I think. He said he got the idea from fixing a boat hole with a bolt. I'll say it again, this bowl is not my work but I wish it were. Steve
  14. From the album: Gene's Stuff

    Closed Chest Maple and walnut
  15. Gene Howe

    Rifle Case Done

    Finally gotter done.
  16. I'm getting close to the finishing stage for a walnut mantle clock I've been working on, and I'm looking for suggestions for an appropriate finish. The clock will be on a shelf in the bathroom, and so will be exposed to the humidity coming from the shower. Would danish oil be a good finish, or should I go with a poly? Also thinking of a seal coat of shellac, followed by several coats of satin poly. The shellac would probably be from a rattle can, and the poly would be wipe-on. The clock shouldn't be subject to too much physical wear and tear, so I am just mainly concerned about the bathroom environment.
  17. Steve Krumanaker

    D. A. attack

    Yea, it stands for what you think it does. When I finish a bowl on the lathe I first finish the bottom and then hold the bowl with a vacuum chuck to finish the rest of it. I've been wanting to try the technique with brush on lacquer and I guess I was thinking about that and not much else. This bowl has one coat of shellac for sealer on it. I started it spinning and applied the shellac, then went in the house for a bit. When I go back out to the shop, the bowl is laying on the floor with several pieces of bark broken off. Luckily I keep a messy shop and there was a bed of shavings or it probably would've been worse. I have several lights over my lathe which are plugged into a switchable plug strip. I normally plug my vacuum pump into a separate outlet but not thinking I plugged it into the one I use for the lights. I ALWAYS turn my lights off when I leave the shop. Amazingly I was able to get the pieces glued back on and it's hard to tell they were even broken. Thank goodness for super glue. Steve
  18. Steve Krumanaker

    Walnut bowl, not quite round

    I roughed this bowl a few years ago and left some bark on it. By the time I got around to finish turning it the bark was pretty well toast. Rather than reduce the diameter I sanded those areas flat. I kind of like it but not sure if I'd do it again. Finish is fast drying gloss poly applied while spinning slowly. Of course I had to drop it right after I took it off the lathe, oh well, adds character I guess. Steve
  19. Well I made it through the Christmas holiday- mostly by hiding out in the basement shop! Member @Cliff posed a question about salvaging a warped bowl blank. Check out some of the suggestions and see if you can give Cliff some help- @Steve Krumanaker posted a beautiful natural edge walnut bowl. Keeping that much bark intact is quite a feat!! Check out his post and the comments here- @HandyDan set me a link to a really cool video about making multiple copies of little wooden horses- on the lathe! Although the audio is in German (I think), it is really neat to see how they duplicated the horses. There are additional items being made on the lathe- all from a log round! I found a couple of videos on making platters. I think they are easier to make than bowls. First from Carl Jacobson- And the second one from Tim Yoder- Tim's video is a two parter and the second part is linked on his YouTube site. Also, check out Tim's use of the Easy Wood Chuck! While hiding out in the basement, I had the chance to experiment with a new (for me) turning media.I wanted to try my hand at some acrylic casting/turning. During a visit to Hobby Lobby, I found some "Alumilite" brand casting resin- Hobby Lobby has 40% off coupons which brought the price down to about $20. I've had a little experience with casting in the past. I really didn't want to have to buy molding materials for a simple turning so I stopped by the "Dollar Store" and bought a 3-pack of plastic cereal bowls- I figured this would make a fine mold to cast a blank for turning another bowl. Even if the resin didn't release the casting, I could just turn away the blue plastic. I must admit, that most of these ideas came from Carl Jacobson and Peter Brown's YouTube videos. Anyway, The little blue bowls held 2.5 cups of liquid. The resin pack was enough for 4 cups of liquid. Using Mr. Brown's idea of including a wooden lathe mounting piece molded into the casting and some extra filler, I figured I could get away with 2 cups of resin. I turned a bowl shaped piece of wood- not hollowed- for the mount and used a bunch of lathe shavings for the filler. Mixed up the resin and poured the blank. The instructions indicate that the ideal temperature is 70° or higher for the chemical reaction/hardening. Hmmm, 60° in the basement- the solution- My seed starter heating pad and a cardboard cover to trap the heat and 24 hours later, the results- Unmolding wasn't a problem either. I drilled a small hole on the center of the plastic bowl and used air pressure to pop the casting free. When I worked making casting, years ago, we either used vacuum chambers or pressure chambers to eliminate any tiny bubbles that may have been trapped in the casting material. I had neither method so I expected a few voids- I think if the casting would have been done in a warmer environment, there would not have been as many of these defects. I used the chuck screw to mount the blank to the lathe/chuck Turned the outside to shape and created a recess to reverse the blank. Sanded the outside to 12000 grit and then used Turtle Wax swirl and scratch remover. Reversed the blank and turned away the wooden insert leaving a support post to help hold the blank with the tailstock. Never having worked with this material before, I wasn't sure how thin I could make the walls. I left them a little over 1/4. Sanded/finished the outside the same way as the inside I think I need to run it through the dishwasher to clean out some of the tiny air bubble holes that trapped the Turtle Wax compound. Turned completely with Easy Wood Tools!! Safe Turning
  20. Dane Franco

    Walnut Chair Joinery

    From the album: Dane Franco

  21. Dane Franco

    Walnut Chair Plans

    From the album: Dane Franco

  22. Dane Franco

    Walnut Chair Joinery 2

    From the album: Dane Franco

  23. Dane Franco

    Walnut Chair Joinery 1

    From the album: Dane Franco

  24. I get Tom Fidgen's Newsletter in my inbox and I always look forward to it. Tom is a hand made by hand tool guy, long story short, great stuff, beautiful work, I have been following him for along time. In the most recent newsletter he is advertising his new Two Handled Rasps, these are beautiful tools, I want them, I gotta have them, don't know how yet, but some day I'll have them in my shop. These tools just make sense, with their two handles, stitched rasp, these are made for accurate stock removal. I have no horse in the game here, I just love beautiful tools is all. Here they are. Just thought I'd share them.
  25. Smallpatch

    I started this box

    I couldn't find any hinges then misplaced the lid when I started putting the 100 % Tung oil on. And it has sat there looking heart broken and dejected ever since. I still can't figure out what or why I had started building it! I finally asked the one who knows everything and she said she had requested a tape dispenser like the one I built for me...

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