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Shane Whitlock

Enterprise Band Saw Restoration ... Updated with Video on pg. 4

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"Back From The Archives :1897423278_OldManSmiley:"

 

I wasn't looking for another project, I already have to many machines in que for restoration, but I received a phone call from my friend Andy the other night. He told me that someone had just listed a huge band saw for a hundred bucks on the classifieds, so I called the owner right away and told him I'd take it and I would be there Saturday to pick it up. I figured if it was in rough shape I could scrap it for that much.

 

The saw is a 36 incher, in rough but mostly complete shape. It's made by Enterprise MFG. Co.

Here is a picture of the badge. Strange that no serial number was ever stamped on it.

IMG_0598.jpg

 

I did a little research and didn't find much info on them. The Vintage Machinery site states that Enterprise Manufacturing Company was established in 1878 and was later changed to The Enterprise Company in 1913.

They made sawmills and engines, but I could find no info about them ever making band saws.

 

I thought maybe they just rebadged the machine, which was common practice back in the day, but I looked at every single 36 inch band saw on the Vintage Machinery site and couldn't find another one, nothing even similar to this one.

 

The saw is heavy duty and very well made. I'm guess the weight around 1400 lbs. The bottom wheel is solid cast iron and weighs about 200 pounds, the table top just a little less but not much. The blade guard, small table, and weight for the blade tension can be seen leaning against the saw at the bottom of this picIMG_0579.jpg

It's hard to judge the size of the machine from the pics but the guide column is 1 1/2 inch solid steel and the cast iron wheel to adjust the column up and down is 8 inches.

 

One thing that I found to be cool is they used a lot of cast bronze or brass in the machine. It will look great all cleaned up and polished. The long handle you can see in front of the wheel to adjust the blade tension is solid brass and is used to adjust the tilt of the upper wheel.IMG_0590.jpg

 

A shot from below shows the trunnions, which are in great shape, and the hand wheel to adjust the table tilt. 

The tilt scale is also brass and a 1/4 inch thick.

IMG_0586.jpg

 

It took about 2 hours to get the machine stripped down to a manageable weight so I could get it off the trailer.

IMG_0600.jpg

 

No access to a fork lift this time so it was unloaded using a cherry picker and a pallet jack.

The next pics were taken by my daughter,who picked up the photography bug from me …

she does a great job.

My wife and I getting the saw up in the air.

215002.jpg

Getting the saw down the steep slope into my shop with the help of my step dad and my wife,

who is always willing to help me out when restoring a machine.

263252.jpg

 

Working hands

 

20110807.jpg

The babbitt bearings are in descent shape but I think I will repour them. The lower blade guard is missing, along with the levers to move the flat belt from the idler pulley to the drive pulley.

The worse thing is the upper wheel has a crack in it across the rim, thank god it wasn't on the hub, but I think I've come up with a way to fix it. If not, I will be looking for a replacement.

Oh, I also picked up a nice 5 hp 3 phase Westinghouse motor to power itIMG_0583.jpg

Thanks for looking. I will post the restoration pics when I get it done.

 

Shane

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Your daughter does well with the photos. You have taught her well Shane. You are blessed to have a wife that will help with that. Looks like a steep slope down with the saw to the shop. Glad you got it in without a hitch. You will have that saw looking superb, I know. Will you keep it or sell it? Your work on restoring is just some of the best around. Thanks for bringing us along.

 

Bob Kloes

http://www.bobkloes.com

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Thanks guys!

 

Bob this one I will keep and probably sell one of my other band saws.

 

Yes, the slope is very steep. It didn't used to be that way but UDOT redid the highway in front of my house a couple years back. They raised the road some and widen it up a bunch bringing it much closer to my shop. It's a pain, especially with getting the big machines in there.

 

Getting the band saw in there wasn't to bad. I used the pallet jack to help us out. I raised it up til it was just barely carrying some of the weight of the saw but the bottom of the pallet was still dragging so it acted like a skid to slow it down. If I would of raised it to much it would of went flying down the concrete but just enough and we actually had to push it down the slope ... Scarey but the plan worked. My wife has been told many times that if one of these big machines starts to tip to get out of the way and let if fall. The machine can be replaced, she can't.

 

One thing I like to do before starting a restoration is pick an ugly piece of the machine and clean it up. It keeps me motivated during the restoration. I usually select a handle wheel cause they are easy to make look good, but on this one I picked the tilt scale.

 

I just ran out to the shop, hit it with a brass wheel then polished it up with a buffing wheel ... only took about 10 minutes to make look pretty. I still has a few scratches but a little more effort and they should come out.

IMG_0603.jpg

 

Shane

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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I am very new to this, but you never cease to amaze me with the equipment you find. I am looking forward to following along on this transformation. That looks like it will be a great machine when it is finished. Amazing how quickly you cleaned up that scale.

 

We will be watching and waiting.

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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I was intrigued with the city of its origin.  Columbiana is a village near Youngstown with a poputlation now of about 5,000. It makes me wonder how big or small the company and the town was when it was made and how many they made.

 

Nice snag Shane!

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Shane,

 

Now that I see what you had to go through to get that thing into your shop, I feel a bit guilty that I did not stay longer to lend a hand. Your daughter took some great photos. Did Dan get to your shop on Sunday?

 

I think that band saw is going to come out looking awesome. The tilt scale already looks great. I'm glad you grabbed that. I look forward to cutting wood with you on it.

 

Andy

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Ron, thanks for the info on the town. 5,000 now, it was probably a whole lot smaller back in the early 1900s ... Interesting.

 

Andy I never did hear from Dan, was hoping he was gonna stop by. Had a great time Saturday and I'm glad you came along. Hope my wife didn't yack your ear off ... lol.

 

Shane

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Shane,

 

I don't have an answer to your question, but can tell you that I've had machines from Tannewitz, Oliver and American Sawmill Machinery that had un-stamped tags on them. This looks like it'll be a nice saw.

 

 

Arthur

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Shane,

 

Great snag on the band saw!!

 

The tilt scale came out great as I expected it would, and I can't wait to see the finished machine.

 

That motor looks like it came out of some trolley barn rat hole. So great when a period correct motor comes with the machine.

 

Hope your wife and you were both wearing your steel toed flip-flops when moving that thing!!

 

Good luck with the restore!

 

Ray

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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I haven't had a chance to do much work on the band saw yet. Been waiting to get the Crescent Universal Wood-Worker out of the way so I have room to work and painting.

 

Today I was planning on pouring some new babbitt for the lower wheel but when I took a good look at them I realized they were in pretty good shape. I pulled one of the thin shims on each bearing cap, wiped down the babbitt with some mineral spirits and used some prussian blue to see how tight everything was. Everything looked good. 

 

I also pulled out the old felt from the oil reservoirs and packed in some new felt. Then I finished cleaning the casting and polished the bolts.

 

I was curious as to how much this casting weighed so I put it on my shop scale which tops out at a 100 lbs. The casting, without the spindle, weighed more than the scale would handle. I guess it weighs around a 125 lbs. No wonder why my arms hurt from holding that sucker up to the wire wheel and hauling it around the shop.

 

IMG_0609.jpg

 

One thing I think is cool is that all the casting numbers on this machine have a star in front of the numbers.

IMG_0611.jpg

 

I'll tackle the top bearing tomorrow.

 

 

Shane

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Shane, that bandsaw is a beast!! I am sure you will make it look as nice as all the other restores you do. Congrats on the find!! Makes the Dewalt GWI I picked up last weekend for $100 seem like I got robbed based on the metal content you got for $100. That table alone on that thing probably outweighs the whole GWI.......

 

By the way, what kind of buffer set up are you using to do your buffing? Wheels? Size? Buffing blocks?

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Shane,

 

I know you are busy, but I'm curious now. How did that top bearing look?

 

I called the auction and that Royersford Excelsior went for about $275. The auctioneer thinks the buyer just bid on it for the tooling and threw the press away. Ouch!!

 

Andy

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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