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John Morris

MWTCA March 2018 "What's It" Project

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No. 63 Low Angle Jack Plane Woodriver.jpgGrand Prize

We are proud to offer a Woodriver No. 63 Low Angle Jack Plane to this months "What's It" winner. This months "What's It" is sponsored by our supporter Woodcraft Supply.

 

Originally advertised as a plane for heavy stock removal across the grain, the No. 62 has found a home as a smoother and is quite popular among collectors. The WoodRiver® No. 62 is faithful to the original design, but is almost a full pound heavier at approximately 4.6 lbs. It features a body cast from ductile iron, with a bed angle of 12°, a bubinga tote and front knob, and a high-carbon steel blade with a 25° bevel. The plane measures a little less than 14" in length x 2-7/16" in width and has a 2"-wide blade. (Value $205.00)

 

"What's It" Basic Rules Reminder

(For a full run down on this project and rules please go to: "The Patriot Woodworker and MWTCA "What's It" project")

  • Only Patriot Woodworker Members are eligible to participate and receive the award.
  • The MWTCA only accepts a verified source to support your answer, so one should be submitted with your answer, such as a patent, catalog entry, tool book reference, or a respectable website on the subject. Do not let these requirements prevent you from having fun and submitting educated answers on the subject without verification, we can worry about references later. All answers are welcome, as well as healthy debates regarding "What's It".
  • If a verified and referenced answer is not arrived at by the end of each month's "What's It" project, a random draw will be performed for a "One Year MWTCA Club Membership".
  • Only Patriot Woodworker's who participate in this "What's It" topic will be included in the random draw.

 

Ok ladies and gentlemen, we now have our March "What's it" live and ready!

The image(s) below is a MWTCA "What's It" image for you to research, and tell us all here in this topic post, just what the heck is it!

 

Project details

The information provided hereon is all the information that is provided, no further information on this item will be added.

Remember, "What's It" is not always woodworking related!

 

"It was found in the tool chest of a professional cabinet maker and interior carpenter."

"Moving the handle back and forth rotates the four parts with short prongs seen here. These four parts are supposedly not cutters."

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KnrwXfd.jpg

 

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My first guess would be an antique bottle capper, to do four bottle at a time.

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1 hour ago, PostalTom said:

My first guess would be an antique bottle capper, to do four bottle at a time.

 

I believe you are right..

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Looks like a finger pinching, knuckle buster to me;)

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whatever it twists, it will do 4 at a time.

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If I may jump in, I am not seeing the bottle thing happening, only because if you look at it closely, you'll see that the mechanisms provide for the turning ends to go up and down in opposing actions. So with one ram of the lever, two ends are going down, and two ends are riding up, see my red boxes for the areas I am talking about.

Do you all see it? And if that is the case, why would a bottle capper or screw device have opposing actions, instead of all the bottles done in the same action?

what's it march 2018.jpg

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57 minutes ago, Dadio said:

Thats because it is a Corking machine,John, one puts the cork in the other pulls it out..

I can see how it may be able to push a cork in, but how does it pull the cork out?

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load two bottles...

move lever and cork them...

as two plungers plunge two  retract ...

load two bottles in the retracted positions..

move lever in opposite direction...

those two bottles get corked and the two that were just done are released...

remove the two that are done and refill the position w/ two needing corking...

two positions...

two hands..

work ambidextrously...

 

repeat till cross eyed or migraine sets in.....

Edited by Stick486

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so Ed (job super) tells me to go cork the 250 vanity tops...

are you sue ED...

yup...

no joke...

nope...

but Ed...

just go get it done...

so Bill and I go and pull, trim, replace and cork the tops...

Ed goes nuts about what we did..

everyone on the job swore ED said corking...

funny thing was his corking is spelt caulking.. and that had already been done...

 

ED was from the deepest south side of south..

Edited by Stick486

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I saw it when I looked at it too.  I was going to suggest that it is a part to a bank vault lock mechanism and this part moves some tumblers.

 

image.png.0395c08fe5df7eae48d87517343457a4.png

Edited by HandyDan

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I do not think this is a corking machine either, my question regarding how does the machine pull corks out, look at the pads that make contact with the cork if this is what we say it is, a corking machine, those pads have no way of grabbing a cork and pulling it out.

 

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6 minutes ago, John Morris said:

those pads have no way of grabbing a cork and pulling it out.

 

no pulling...

inserting only...

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4 minutes ago, Stick486 said:

no pulling...

inserting only...

aint buying it. Those pads that make contact with the cork are not sufficient to prevent the cork from slipping side to side or breaking in half, see old cork machine below, see the cup that fits over the cork to prevent the cork from slipping side to side?

And why would a cork machine need to spin?

Set-of-2-Antique-French-Corking-Machines

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for a mushroom shaped cork???...

il_570xN.1163144167_xblk.jpg

 

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Well we eliminated that one.

So when the handle is pulled back #1 and #3 go down in a turning motion and #2 and #4 go up , rotating the same direction. When the handle is pushed forward then #2 and  #4 go down in an opposite twisting motion, and #1 and #3  come up all rotating in the same direction .

When you look at the second picture down you see a second rack gear on the back of the carriage with all the spindles on it. so the lever moves the whole carriage and the upper rack gear is stationary. This means that the whole carridge is moving back and forth while the spindles are going up and down.

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I'm not exactly sure what it is but look at a couple of features.  First, there is a taper on the cylinder of each unit with a stop pin.  Second, there are tangs or drivers on the face of each one.   The older valves in a combustion engine had recessed slots in them.  If it wasn't found in a cabinet makers chest I'd say it was a device to lap valves.   

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9 hours ago, John Morris said:

And why would a cork machine need to spin?

 

twist the cork in while pushing,,,

easier...

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4 hours ago, Ron Dudelston said:

I'm not exactly sure what it is but look at a couple of features.  First, there is a taper on the cylinder of each unit with a stop pin.  Second, there are tangs or drivers on the face of each one.   The older valves in a combustion engine had recessed slots in them.  If it wasn't found in a cabinet makers chest I'd say it was a device to lap valves.   

I saw that too, Ron and the same thing came to mind about the indents in engine valve tops to lap them.  The firing order of this machine must be 1,3,2,4.

Maybe a control for reversing a steam engine ?

Herb

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