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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
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Part 3:

lew

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Part 3:

The work space in my shop is so small that I needed to build this project in stages. With the top finished, it was time to move on to the legs of the base. The entire base frame is made from poplar and the minister is going to paint it white. His specs were for full 4” x 4” legs. I suppose I could have gotten 16/4 poplar boards but those pieces would have been so large and heavy that I don’t think I could have manhandled them through the milling processes. I started with 5/4 boards and milled enough stock for a 4 x 4 glue up. I finished out the planing/ripping the boards a little over sized in thickness and width to allow for shifts in the glue up process.

 

leg stock.JPG

 

Gluing up the blanks was straight forward

 

leg glue up 1.JPG

 

Space and number of clamps dictated gluing one leg assembly at a time.

 

leg glue up.JPG

 

 

Once all of the legs dried, the jointer and planer brought the blanks square and to the correct dimensions.

 

leg blanks squared.JPG

 

 

Cutting the legs to length was up next. I opted to use the table saw for this operation. I have a chop saw but it is one of the very early models with a 7.5” blade- it wasn’t going to make the cut in one pass. The table saw wouldn’t make the cut in one pass either but I felt I’d have a little more control using it.

I set up my cross cut sled and squared one end of each leg. Next, I added an extend stop block set for the leg length. One pass, roll the blank over, second pass- done.

 

leg blanks to length.JPG

 

leg blanks to length 1.JPG

 

 

 

At this point, it was time to layout and cut the mortices in the legs. To make certain the mortices were properly oriented, I labeled everything.

 

legs prepped for mortice.JPG

leg blank orientation.JPG

 

 

leg blank mortice location.JPG

 

Some practice slots with the hollow chisel morticer.

 

mortice trial run.JPG

 

mortice trial run 2.JPG

 

 

Twenty-four mortices later.

mortices done.JPG

 

The minister added the chamfer detail around the top so I thought it would look OK to continue that detail throughout the build. I would have added the chamfer around the leg feet anyway to prevent tear out if the table was slid across the floor.

 

mortice and chamfer.JPG

 

 

Some sanding left but the legs are finished.

 

leg done.JPG



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