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 I've been oiling a grandmother and Cuckoo clocks. It is a task  that I don't really don't like. Lew said that he had used WD40 with success. I've never done that on the grandmother clock, but do that same thing with cuckoo. I really don't know how long it can last. We got it as a wedding gift over 50 years ago. Her sister gave it to us, they had it on the wall for years and could not stand the noisy bird day and night. The bellows leather has long ago cracked and I replaced it with very thin rubber gasket material. Once as I was hanging it on the wall, the whole thing fell apart in my hands. The glue/wood was so deteriorated that the joints gave way. The back piece of the clock was still hooked securely on the wall. I took it as a challenge and put it all back together, it took me a couple of days of trial and error to get it RIGHT. 

 For years now, when I lube it, I take it to my shop, clamp it in my wood vice, open it all up, blow it out with canned air, insert a rag to catch excess spray and give it a spray with WD40. Then I respray with canned air to blow excess WD into the rag. I set it up to run with it open and exposed. I turn a small fan on it and allow some of the excess to drain and dry up some of the wood so that the WD odor isn't bad. It has been good now for around 10/15 years doing that. 

 I still do the grandmother clock the same one-drop-at-a-time oiling. However now the synthetic oils can last 8 years. I LIKE THAT!

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Ron if I was a clock repairman I would tell everyone to not use WD 40 for that would cut into my business. But thats whats good in this country for every one can do and use as they please as long as it is not against the law. My clocks are still running so I am happy....

 

The synthetic oils are getting better all the time. My camper has a Cat engine. They told me just because it gets to the suggested mileage to change oil come by first and we will analyze the oil and tell you if its ready to change for if you have not been abusing the engine the oil should last longer than our original estimates.

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17 hours ago, Ron Altier said:

Here is what a pro said on web;

 

“NEVER AND I MEAN NEVER USE WD-40” on the clock movement. I know clock repair shops that will hand you the clock back and refuse to work on them if the even smell WD-40. I personally have to charge twice as much to clean a movement that has been sprayed with WD-40 or any other type of spray oil. We have to run it through our ultrasonic cleaner several times with fresh cleaning solution each time and the solution is not cheap. DO NOT use sewing machine oil or 3 in 1 oil. There are several companies on the internet that will sell you high quality synthetic oil and some even sell an oiling kit.

@Ron Altier

 

Listen to this sage advise. WD-40 is one of the worst sprays that you can have in your home. People have been brainwashed into believing that it is a cure-all. IT IS NOT!

 

Once the solvent carriers evaporate WD leaves a gummy, sticky, residue that will attract every speck of dirt and dust. IT HAS NO lubrication properties. It was designed as a displacement for moisture until the item could be cleaned an properly lubricated.

 

What you need is a good synthetic oil that leaves a molecular lubrication component, possibly a silicon component. However, I would ask a local watch repairman or jewelry shop what they use before you decide.

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10 minutes ago, schnewj said:

Listen to this sage advise. WD-40 is one of the worst sprays that you can have in your home. People have been brainwashed into believing that it is a cure-all. IT IS NOT!

ain't that the truth...

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@schnewj and @Stick486, thanks for the WD-40 heads up, I use it sometimes, but lately I have moved to a silicone based lubricant, and for other things such as door hinges etc, I use old fashioned 3 in 1, seem to last a long time.

 

I was always suspicious of WD!

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48 minutes ago, John Morris said:

@schnewj and @Stick486, thanks for the WD-40 heads up, I use it sometimes, but lately I have moved to a silicone based lubricant, and for other things such as door hinges etc, I use old fashioned 3 in 1, seem to last a long time.

 

I was always suspicious of WD!

WTB Schnooge agrees w/ this...

especially on the door hinges...

 

VOE says WD is a mistake and all myth... it's a wet something or another that attracts all kinds of trash... does way more harm than good in the scheme of things... I've made a lot of money in my career cleaning/fixing/replacing/repairing after the fact...

It makes for a humongous mess [remember this come finishing time] and if it gets into an electric motor kiss the motor goodbye... It's also prone to flash fire and really doesn't work all that well on anything but it's convenient...

 

I'm real partial to Triflow but most any dry lube will work well providing it's has Teflon/PFTE in it... [higher percentage by volume is more gooder]...

CRC, Tiolube, KG and DuPont each have several most excellent industrial spec DRY SOLID FILM lubricants..

Criteria - dries dry to the touch, high pressure load bearing, contains Teflon/PFTE, barrier forming, extreme temperature range, [usually -100 to +500F] isn't hygroscopic, does not collect dirt, not flammable in dry state, chemical resistant, does not contain silicone, has a long list of compatibles and is really very long lasting... or any of or all the features WD hasn't got any of....

one thing about dry solid film lubricants is that when you apply them and you think that you didn't apply enough you have probably applied too much..

very, very little goes a loooooooooooooooong way...

Just wait until you do your saw's arbor mechanism w/ dry lube.. you and your saw will never be the same... You'll treat everything that moves in the shop in short order... Please thoroughly clean whatever before lubing..

It's a great release agent too...

 

Dry Film Lubricants are high performance coatings made up of very fine particles of lubricating agents blended with binders and other special additives. Once cured, these lubricating agents bond to the part surface as a solid film which reduces galling, seizing and fretting and protects against corrosion. Through the combination of these properties, dry film lubricants greatly improve the wear life of coated parts.

Dry film/solid film lubricants allow for operating pressures above the load-bearing capacity of normal greases and oils. They are also less prone to collecting soil particulates than greases and oils. In some applications, the coating is self-burnishing, leading to improved, rather than decreased, performance over time. Some blends of dry film/solid film lubricants are also temperature and chemical resistant allowing for their use in harsh environments such as jet engines where exposure to aviation fuel and extreme temperatures are the norm.

This is the type of lubricant you want to use if you have a CNC.

AVOID using anything with silicone in it, because it seems to eventually get on everything including your project and you will have all kinds of finishing problems. Silicone products should be banned from the shop along w/ WD40.

WD will kill bearings in very short order..... it dissolves the bearing's lubricant leading to them being run dry...

Bottom line - wet lubricants and saw dust don't go together!

 

Silicons, WD-40 and wet oils/grease and final finishes do NOT go together or play nicely....
this IS NOT a myth.

You don't need gobs of siliconized wax, silicone or wet oils/grease to contaminate the surface of your project.... Like they say, very, very little goes a loooong way for about forever!!!
why risk or take a chance screwing up your finishes, your project, risk set backs and untold rework if alternatives are available that are much safer to use???
white lithium is a disaster waiting to happen across the board...
also wet lubes and WD (WD is NOT a lubricant) tend to collect all kinds of trash and make working things more difficult to operate... it also destroys bearings and motor internals...

REMEMBER - using oils, greases, or anything sticky in the shop (even where it won't or can't touch wood) is NOT recommended.... Those type products are dust magnets and will cause serious grief later... Any lube on those parts must either be dry to start with or must become dry to the touch after application....

run a quick test:
Many people use WD-40 to help them remove rust from cast iron surfaces - until I ran into the silicone problem and smartened up.... Now, apply some WD-40 to your table saw surface, work the surface well, as if you were removing a rusty spot. Then, clean the surface really well, but leave a small area near the blade where the WD-40 is not removed so well.
Now, go through the entire process as if you were doing a project start to finish on scrap test piece(s)....
Apply some shellac, to seal the surface- you are likely to see fish eyes, indicating that the shellac has not wetted the surface properly. This is the problem with silicons, WD and wet oils....
do the same for siliconized automotive wax...
putting these products on your moving parts, bits, blades and tools in general you risk contaminating/ruining your project....

VOE...
be smart and get ahead of the game... completely remove all silicons, WD-40 and wet oils/greases from the shop....
stop jeopardizing or putting your work at risk......

Finishing: Silicone Contamination

using oils, greases, or anything sticky in the shop (even where it won't or can't touch wood). Those type products are dust magnets and will cause grief later. Any lube on those parts must either be dry to start with or must become dry to the touch after application.

 

 @John Morris

I have this and so much more on PDF but you won't allow posting PDF's....

Edited by Stick486

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About all I allow in the shop is 3 in 1, dry-lube (lately I've been trying Liquid Wrench brand...verdict is still out on it), Rust free spray, Boeshield, and Johnson's Paste wax.

 

The Johnson's gets used only because a have a large can and it literally lasts for years. Others are just as good. Boeshield is great for extended storage but it can cause some finishing issues...so, if I have used it on anything it gets a through cleaning with, say, Mineral Spirits before woodworking use. There are a vast number of types, brands and substitutions available, but for simplicity's sake I limit my choices. I have what works for me.

 

WD-40 is regulated to cleaning rusty handsaw plates and removing adhesive residues. It is generally, useless for anything else.

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22 minutes ago, schnewj said:

Johnson's Paste wax.

now that you mentioned it...

 

Johnson's paste wax for your tables and tools...

You can add Briwax, Black Bison, Behlen, Trewax and Mohawk to the list of acceptable waxes...

If they contain Carnauba wax they will finish harder and be longer wearing/lasting...

You can even add more Carnauba if you want...

 

http://www.parkbeekeeping.com/products/detail/carnauba-wax

 

Wax applied to a warm surface is a big plus...

Mechanical polishing over hand buffing is way better.. (elcheapo car buffer or a wool bonnet on your ROS)...

Polishing is what makes the wax work to it's fullest...

More polishing.. Better results...

 

above all.. make sure it DOES NOT contain silicone...

 

Wax clean up/removal/thinning is done w/ mineral spirits...

A pound of wax should last way more than a decade maybe even well into the second...

Put it on any tool table surface you have...

Great for plane soles too...

To melt/soften the wax put the container of wax in hot water but not submerged...

 

Carnauba wax, sometimes also referred to as palm wax or Brazil wax, is a kind of wax that is made from the extracts of palm leaves. These leaves are found on the plant ‘Copernicia prunifera’, a short plant that is usually found in Brazil, especially in the states of Ceara, Rio Grande do Norte and Piaui. Also known as the ‘Queen of waxes’, it is found in yellowish or brownish flakes.

 

Stick w/ your silicone-less furniture paste wax and avoid possible contamination of your project...


If you are considering candle wax... not all candles are created equal...
You also have to contend w/ dyes in the wax...

Best to steer clear of using candle wax...

Candle making colorants come in a vegetable based block so there is no paraffin in these color blocks.

Candle Wax | Candlewic
Candle Dye, Colors & Pigments | Candlewic

PARAFFIN CANDLES
Paraffin development began in 1830, but manufactured paraffin was not introduced until 1850. It provided an alternative to tallow which gave off an unpleasant odor when burned. In 1854 paraffin and stearin (the solid form of fat) were combined to create stronger candles, very similar to those we use today.

BEESWAX CANDLES
Candles have a wide variety of ingredients, but there are only a few main ingredients that are used throughout most of the world. We will talk about the main types, and the advantages and differences of each.
Most honey and bees wax is collected from July to September. It can come from the pollination of canola, sweet clover or sunflowers. Generally these plants result in a lighter scent and lighter colored beeswax.
There are two types, solid beeswax and honeycomb wax. The solid bees wax candle is created by pouring liquid wax into a candle mold. The result is a smooth, dense candle which burns for an extremely long time. Honeycomb beeswax candles are created by rolling honeycomb textured sheets. The honeycomb candle is less dense and burns faster.
Beeswax candles produce a bright flame, do not drip, do not smoke or sputter, and produce a fragrant honey odor while being burned.

CRYSTAL WAX CANDLES
These are also called wax tarts or wax potpourri. They are made with an all-natural candle wax that holds twice as much fragrance as paraffin wax candles, making them suitable for highly scented candles. They are used with a potpourri warmer (without any water). The fragrance emerges when the candle starts to melt.

GEL CANDLES
Gel candles have a new and unique look. They give off a beautiful illumination and a wonderful aroma. And they burn three times as long as wax candles.
But be careful. Gel candles produce a higher burning flame and they burn much hotter. Too much heat can shatter a glass candle-holder or container which can ignite nearby combustibles, resulting in a room fire. To be safe, never burn a gel candle more than four hours.

SOY CANDLES
Soy wax candles are made from soy beans. They are non-toxic, non-carcinogenic and bio-degradable. They burn up to 40% longer than paraffin candles and burn evenly which means there is no tunneling effect. However, it is not recommended to burn more than four hours at a time. Soy candles are very sensitive to temperature and light. They should be stored away from sunlight, fluorescent lighting and other sources of heat.

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Be careful of today's "paraffin" candles. They may NOT be real paraffin but a synthetic concoction that may contain silicons. If you want to be sure you are actually getting real paraffin, look for canning wax. You can find it at Wally World or anyplace that sells canning supplies. If you can't find it with the canning supplies, which are generally in the housewares section, walk over to the grocery side and you'll find it there. it is sold in a pound box which contains several ~3" x 5" x 1/2" blocks. One block will last you for a long, long, time.

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5 hours ago, Stick486 said:

REMEMBER - using oils, greases, or anything sticky in the shop (even where it won't or can't touch wood) is NOT recommended.... Those type products are dust magnets and will cause serious grief later... Any lube on those parts must either be dry to start with or must become dry to the touch after application....

When I cleaned and lubed my planer a couple of years ago, the maintenance instructions in the owner's manual specified to use high pressure grease, which I obtained from Auto Zone.  I understand what you are saying, but I will probably still follow manufacture's instructions in similar cases.  

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1 hour ago, PostalTom said:

When I cleaned and lubed my planer a couple of years ago, the maintenance instructions in the owner's manual specified to use high pressure grease, which I obtained from Auto Zone.  I understand what you are saying, but I will probably still follow manufacture's instructions in similar cases.  

having a zerk, a gasketed/sealed bearing/fitting.. grease is the way to go...

no getting around it...

if the the grease gets everywhere... time to rethink something...

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