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sreilly24590 -
steven newman -
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So I had hoped to get to Lee Valley while in Vancouver before we left for our Alaskan Cruise but the promise of going to Butchart Gardens one day took the whole day and the flight from DC to Vancouver left the first day with us exhausted so there was no getting to Lee Valley as hoped. And flying back from Fairbanks niched any chance.

 

So as much as I wanted to I'm lead to deciding on a low angle block plane which I intend to use for taking the edge off some corners and for planing end grain which I hear it does quite well. Better than sanding if truth be told. I need it to be perfectly flat on the sides for end grain and using a homemade sled which Lee Valley shows works quite well using plywood and making the groove for the plane. Of course they show this for use with their special shooting plane but should work equally well for the bench plane I would think, maybe a slight variation if needed.

 

The second plane I see a need for would be a nice dado plane. Now maybe not totally necessary but I can see a real need for its use in some of my works and plans for other projects. I'm trying to blend hand tools with these wonderful machine I already have. Along those lines I'll need to start thinking of a good rip saw, crosscut saw, and dovetail saw.

 

For now I'm working on the hand planes. With the #4 Smoothing plane and the #62 Jack Plane already secured I think these next ones will fit fine. Just need to determine which ones. From what I saw at the Woodworking Show a few months back the Lee Valley Low Angle Block plane should do very well. Any corrections? Suggestions otherwise?

 

The Dado Plane, well I haven't looked at any so I'm wide open to good suggestions. I rather get one good one then something that really isn't worth it. Old/new, really doesn't matter. Doing a good job is what I'm interested in. Good quality.

 

Thanks for listening.....

 

-Steve

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@sreilly24590, I apologize for the "no reply" to your topic here, somehow I missed it!

 

Here is my opinion based on my own use of the LV Low Angle Block plane. I purchased it for the same reason you are, for end grain. And I used it for awhile to true up end grain and to smooth out end grain as well, but eventually it ended up being my go to plane for chamfering edges and trimming little stuff here and there instead of end grain planing. I love my block plane for various tasks, but I don't like it for end grain. I know folks champion the virtues of a low angled block plane on end grain, but truth be told from my own perspective, I don't know why. 

It's hard to push it through the end grain, for me anyway, I can do it, and I get good results, but I stopped using it for that purpose. And even on a great day I could never get a "better than sand paper" finish on end grain with my LV Block Plane. I don't think I can do that with any plane, not if you are talking about comparing it to sanding end grain to 220 for finishing purposes, if you are talking about planing end grain for "pre-joinery" then yes, it's capable for that purpose.

 

So I eventually hung up my block plane for end grain, and started using my LV Low Angle No. 62 1/2 for that purpose, with a backer edge board to avoid tear-out at the exit end of the board. I know it seems like a big plane for that purpose, but the size of it allowed me to push through the end grain with ease and my control and cut were much better especially with the low angle set of the iron.

Keep in mind, these are my own experiences with the LV Low Angle Block, it, and I just did not get along for that intended purpose of planing end grain.

 

So if I was still planing end grain or shooting ends of boards with my LV Low Angle Jack, I'd rather opt to use it with a shooting board, it seems like purchasing the LV Low Angled Block for the purpose of shooting is kind of redundant, and you are stepping down in quality, while you already have the No. 62 that will do a much superior job at shooting end grain with an accompanying shooting board.

 

With the Veritas Low Angle Jack you can also put a grip on the side of it to make it easier to handle, you can do this for any plane actually. See link below for an excellent article by LV for making a grip.

 

 

article1-1.jpg

 

And Lie Nielsen has a factory made grip to use for their bench planes, it may fit your 62 as well.

 

WWW.LIE-NIELSEN.COM

Hot Dog for the Low Angle Jack Plane This powder-coated Aluminum 'Hot Dog' attaches to the side of the No. 62 Low...

 

Recently I purchased a shooting plane from Lie Nielsen and I love it, along with my shop built shooting board it does a wonderful job.

You can see my shooting board build here:

 

And here is a plan for one as well, as you know by now there are tons of plans and ideas for the "perfect" shooting board. :)

 

So my summary on this Reilly, is you already have a wonderful plane in your LV No. 62, I would just use that with a shooting board for all your end grain needs. I would also purchase that Low Angle Block by LV and you'll have an awesome trim plane for many things, it wasn't until I got my block plane years ago that I realized what a great tool it is for all around everything that needs a little trim here and there, I love using it for chamfering edges, I chamfer or round anything that will be touched by hands in the finished project, just to remove the splinters or skin catches, since I am changing my reliance on sand paper, I am trying to perform most of my final processing with edged tools before finishing.

 

Wish ya the best of luck Reilly!

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Great response John and extremely helpful. I had seen the dedicated shooting board and plane. Pricey set indeed. There may come a time when a dedicated plane such as the above may be needed but for now I'll try my 62-1/2 and see where that takes me. But yes, the block plane is still on my list and I just noticed they have free shipping on $149 or more through 7/10. Hey $12 is $12.....Coulda, shoulda, gotten to LV in Vancouver. I figured with the currency exchange I could have saved $42 US$ but hey, there were more importnat things going on. Like making sure the center of my universe was enjoying herself.

 

I'll look at these plans and work out a suitable handle for the 62-1/2 for now.

 

Thanks again.

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Glad it was helpful Reilly, in no way shape or form was I indicating you should go out and purchase a shooting plane, since you already have that beautiful 62-1/2, that was my main point, you already have a shooting plane! Why use the block plane for shooting? :lol:

The plan I linked you too above, is only for the shooting board, it just happens to have a LN Shooting Plane as the cover photo, the board in that plan, can be used for any plane.

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I missed the question like John .I have the LV low angle with the aux handle and love it. Like John it is great for chamfering and is a go to plus my Stanley block plane. I cannot say the same as John on end grain for I have gotten a perfectly shinny surface on end grain but hate to do it because of the tear out possible on exiting the cut without a jig. Also the low angle is great for curly woods. I do not do much flat work now so info not current but as memory serves

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2 hours ago, Gerald said:

John on end grain for I have gotten a perfectly shinny surface on end grain

I'm probably using it wrong if Gerald is able to successfully get shiny end grain. :wacko: I'll see if I can tune up my use practices and see if I can get that same result, Gerald has instilled hope for my block plane on end grain again.

 

But, since Reilly already has the low angle 62, it makes more sense to use it for shooting, then purchasing the block plane for shooting. But, I would most certainly purchase that block plane because it's a great asset to any tool lineup for general trimming and shaving.

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2 hours ago, Gerald said:

I missed the question like John .I have the LV low angle with the aux handle and love it. Like John it is great for chamfering and is a go to plus my Stanley block plane. I cannot say the same as John on end grain for I have gotten a perfectly shinny surface on end grain but hate to do it because of the tear out possible on exiting the cut without a jig. Also the low angle is great for curly woods. I do not do much flat work now so info not current but as memory serves

Thanks Gerald but I thought the highly figured woods like curly needed a higher angle, like a 50 degree angle? More of a scraper style cut? Maybe I'm confused on that. I'm still leaning toward the LV and they have free shipping on orders over $149 till 7/10 I think. But I would also build a quality shooting board. I saw one on Paul Seller's website that looked like a winner. but then the one on Veritas site was good as well. 

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I only used for a small piece like that so cannot atest to larger areas and you may be correct

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1 hour ago, John Morris said:

I'm probably using it wrong if Gerald is able to successfully get shiny end grain. :wacko: I'll see if I can tune up my use practices and see if I can get that same result as Gerald Reilly, Gerald has instilled hope for my block plane on end grain again.

 

But, since Reilly already has the low angle 62, it makes more sense to use it for shooting, then purchasing the block plane for shooting. But, I would most certainly purchase that block plane because it's a great asset to any tool lineup for general trimming and shaving.

John a good block plane is certainly one I'll be getting. Trying your suggestion using the 62-1/2 is a smart move as it has to be easier I would think. Either way I'll be covered. Just got home from a live demo at Woodcraft on using hand planes, sharpening, inspection of used, and preparing new and used for proper use. Most I knew but as usual I did learn a few things important that I didn't know. Always a good thing. Seems the 2 #4 planes I have (Sargent and a Bailey) need a bit more work yet but I hadn't done anything but inspected them up till now.

Edited by sreilly24590

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Reilly, you are correct, the higher pitched bed on a plane is ideal for figured wood, as your example a scraper plane. A 50 degree is the ideal pitch for a bench plane on figured wood. With my own limited plane collection, I can use my No. 4 smoother with the standard 45 degree pitch, I have used it with relative success on figured wood, but I almost always, 98 percent of the time follow up with a scraper. I am recently getting pretty adequate at tuning and using a scraper, I love it.

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5 minutes ago, sreilly24590 said:

Trying your suggestion using the 62-1/2 is a smart move as it has to be easier I would think.

My biggest complaint with the block plane on end grain is pushing it through, the heft of your 62 is going to be nice.

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I have a few scrapers but haven't prepared them for use. Haven't had a need yet.....but I hear great things about them.

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Update: @Gerald, I was so inspired by your success with your block plane on end grain, I just got back in from the shop, I honed my iron to LV specs as it was when it arrived to my home per these specs on my water stones,

WWW.LEEVALLEY.COM

Veritas® Standard and Low-Angle Block Planes from Lee Valley Tools. Lee Valley offers high-quality woodworking tools...

started with my 4000 cuz it was in pretty good shape, then ended with my 8000, and I excitedly took a board of walnut, up in my vise with end grain up, I skewed my plane and took a pass, while it cut better because of the freshly honed blade, I still can't get a shiny surface! :angry: It's a clean surface as I expected, but not shiny, dang!

Can you disclose your technique Gerald?

 

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John it has been so long since I did that I have no idea how or why. I do remember lots of failed efforts and the chatter was terrible.  Also very light cuts

Edited by Gerald

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Just now, Gerald said:

John it has been so long since I did that I have no idea how or why.

Well, that makes me feel a little better, cuz I get some pretty good chatter too, but when I skew it, the plane slices really nice, just can't get that shiny surface. Hey, if you ever decide to break it out some day, and use it, please remember your very graceful technique to get that shine on end grain. And share it with me oh great master! :)

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hmmm...:ChinScratch:

606092303_BishopsJigroughcuts.JPG.527030412e9a9a9f32d05d2dc1c3bd47.JPG

From this...very rough cut Ash..to..:ph34r:

102557288_BishopsJigshottheedge.JPG.b8e4e1e9707852e89a6e0b61027513ae.JPG

Same end.  Plane is a Stanley No. 3c, type 11/12, with a SW iron....:rolleyes:

 

Bandsaw blade had way too much set...was unable to access the Langdon 75....otherwise I won't need to do this..B)

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