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sreilly24590

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About sreilly24590

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  1. Also I should point out that this is all from memory, my memory, so there may be some differences in translations and accuracies. Or may be out of context....you see where this is going.....but another PDF.. Finishing with Bush Products - The Three Phase System Volume 1.pdf
  2. Seems expensive for just 2 teeth! So would this be an argument for not using the ROS for the final sanding? And I guess the wood and finish would also show more if it were a darker stain and higher grain wood?
  3. I certainly can't argue with that at all. Just repeating what I saw and heard. There was no comparisons done so I take it as personal preference but worth the test to see what the difference would be. And then again I guess you can certainly get carried away with detail. How far is far enough? Personally I have 2 ROS and have been considering a 3rd. As I have seen and heard when it comes to woodworking many things are personal preferences. Like dovetails, machine cut, hand cut, or jig based. They all, if done properly look and work great.
  4. Totally agree WBBN. But I have to try this after seeing it in person. If I can duplicate and get the same effect I'll have another notch....of course this wouldn't be done on shop stuff, not anything I've made yet. I do have a hanging tool cabinet to make using maple that it would look gorgeous on though. Just saying...I've watched the Neil video and see his point on bringing out the details. Definitely an interesting process to try. I'd need to practice on some scrap of course.
  5. I actually just ordered the kit from here. The more I thought about it the more sense it was to give this a try on my projects and see if it delivers what I saw in person. I don't think this is snake oil but it would be interesting to see if it is much different that say Watco Danish Oil. Time will tell.......
  6. One of the things expressed at the Woodworkers Show by Bill Bush was that a ROS is not a good tool when used as a sander due to its design and the nature of grain. As explained by Bill the ROS is well, random, and grain has a direction(s) so it doesn't do a great job of smoothing or cutting the wood surface. It does smooth the surface but not so much as you would get sanding in the direction of the grain. At this point I should have asked if ROS's aren't intended for preliminary sanding and not finish sanding. I see his point but wonder if this isn't getting really specific, I mean like down to a very, very small scale. Now his demonstration was using a small, being like 10x20" small Ash raised panel. The wood had been sized and shaped with the profile cut. His presentation showed how to make a wood sanding block as described in the PDF and get the exact profile by holding the end (top/bottom) lined up with the panel's profile and tracing it with a pencil. Then take a block plane and plane out the majority of the waste before sanding it down to the finished line. To get the exact profile you place the sand paper face up on the profile and sand the block util it fits exactly. Simple but something I wouldn't have thought of I don't think. Using soft wood it went fairly quickly and the jig actually holds the sandpaper tightly. He used a brush to brush off both sandpaper and wood after each grade and the paper he was using doesn't seem to load up. He started at 80 grit and worked up to 400. By time he got to 400 it was totally smooth but then he used the White Fibratex Pad and then the Gray Fibratex Pad wiping them down with a cotton cloth each time. By that time there was a shean to the wood that was even smoother than after the 400 grit sandpaper and looked like it already had a finish applied to it. Using the foam brush and liberally applying the Bush Oil you could see an immediate focus of the wood grain. Letting that oil soak in and then wiping down, again with a cotton cloth, left it looking better than most projects I had ever finished and he wasn't even done. All toll he used 3 coats but of course there wasn't time to demo that but had finished panels that had been. In between he used light sanding and the pads which helped release the particles clinging to the surface leaving it as smooth as I've ever felt wood be. As I write this I begin to wonder if I shouldn't have ponied up the $85 for the kit. Of course the kit only had 1 sanding "block" and his suggestion was to have one for each grade if you did much finishing which makes sense but @ $19.95 each you have $100 invested already plus the supplies but again if they last and make the process go smoother and faster..........He also makes a living at creating and making product for his clients so there is a return on his efficiency. A quart of his oil is $29.95 and that seems reasonable, well actually Watco is about half that but then I couldn't tell you if there's a real difference between the two oils. What I saw of the oil applied was great but whether I could get that result, I don't know and will need to try. The idea of having sanding blocks marked and ready with the sandpaper makes good sense. The other takeaway was creating the profile sanding blocks mentioned above. So watching this demonstration was very beneficial and has spurred an interest in finishing. Will I go to this extent for shop stuff? Probably not but I'll certainly change my method of finishing to see if I can replicate Bill's finish which was far better than I had been doing ever. From the hand sanding to the oil application using the cotton cloth to wipe and the pads to release and discard the finer particles. I t was an eye opening experience that certainly left a strong impression. Between my personal talk with Alex Snodgrass and this demonstration, the trip was well worth the time and energy. Now I gotta pay shipping on the kit...........
  7. Another good set of points. I just got back, man am I tired, almost 5 hours on the road and then the Woodworking show. 1st let me say that I sat in on a talk about finishing by a fellow named Bill Bush and his talk was "Prepping & Finishing a Surface - The Three Phase System". Now I admit what he showed was extremely nice finish using his brand oil, his branded sand papers, and his system. The kits he had were available there but I wasn't quite ready for that yet. I sat up front, listened, and saw his method and understand his reasoning. I really liked the finish and that was just one of his usual 3 coats with light sanding in between of course. I've scanned and attached his 4 page handout for those interested. The two PDFs are the same except for how they were scanned. The first was the handout opened and scanned front and back where the second is in the 4 page booklet form. A few other heavy hitters were there such as Woodpeckers and Lee Valley with the full complement of their planes for onhand use. I have to admit having the ability to put hands on gives you a much better feel of what you're ordering. They were taking orders only w/free shipping. About as close to a discount as you'll get from what I gather. But the highlight was my first 5-10 minutes in the door. I went straight up to Alex Snodgrass and had a fantastic conversation with him. He was the person who put me on the straight and narrow with resawing. Talking to him and getting their guides for my saw was a huge thrill. Worth the 2+ hours both way and the, seemed like forever wait for the doors to open (28 minutes) with bathrooms only on the inside behind those locked doors. Shouldn't have had those 3 mugs of coffee...... Hope the attachments are of some use to youse guys Forgot the website https://bushproducts.com/
  8. Another good set of points. I just got back, man am I tired, almost 5 hours on the road and then the Woodworking show. 1st let me say that I sat in on a talk about finishing by a fellow named Bill Bush and his talk was "Prepping & Finishing a Surface - The Three Phase System". Now I admit what he showed was extremely nice finish using his brand oil, his branded sand papers, and his system. The kits he had were available there but I wasn't quite ready for that yet. I sat up front, listened, and saw his method and understand his reasoning. I really liked the finish and that was just one of his usual 3 coats with light sanding in between of course. I've scanned and attached his 4 page handout for those interested. The two PDFs are the same except for how they were scanned. The first was the handout opened and scanned front and back where the second is in the 4 page booklet form. A few other heavy hitters were there such as Woodpeckers and Lee Valley with the full complement of their planes for onhand use. I have to admit having the ability to put hands on gives you a much better feel of what you're ordering. They were taking orders only w/free shipping. About as close to a discount as you'll get from what I gather. But the highlight was my first 5-10 minutes in the door. I went straight up to Alex Snodgrass and had a fantastic conversation with him. He was the person who put me on the straight and narrow with resawing. Talking to him and getting their guides for my saw was a huge thrill. Worth the 2+ hours both way and the, seemed like forever wait for the doors to open (28 minutes) with bathrooms only on the inside behind those locked doors. Shouldn't have had those 3 mugs of coffee...... Hope the attachments are of some use to youse guys Bill Bush Finishing101.pdf Bill Bush Finishing001.pdf
  9. All good points and leads me to believe I've gotten lazier. Maybe if I get a better sander it won't hurt so bad. I guess I need to start thinking in a different direction. So any sanding on the plywood before stain/finish or just clean and apply? Sand in between coats I understand.
  10. And there you had to say it....sanding, the part I probably dislike the mostess. Just seems tedious and then you just keep getting finer and finer and well you know. I guess I'll just need to accept it as part of the process but I don't have to take it sitting down.
  11. Herb that makes sense and I'm sure mine would (wood?) look better finished and I may well get there. The router table I'd like to at some time but likely just a spray on satin shellac as the top is phenolic and the fence is a Woodpeckers Super Fence so it would look more like a finished piece. I bought a gallon can of satin for the miter station but promptly loaded that up so I really should but then again if I do that then what about the others......one thing leads to another. I like the look just not the work,
  12. So after working on both of these irons today, I don't think either had ever been flattened, I came to a conclusion. 1st, those small irons are a bear to hold and flatten. Neither of my Veritas MKII jigs will hold the 101 iron and I'm not entirely sure what bevel is on it but I think between 20-25 degrees. For that matter I'm not sure what bevel is supposed to be on it but I should be able to look that up but that also doesn't mean it's what the bevel is now. On the 61 I discovered the sole just behind the mouth had a cracked piece of cast which came off. I can probably epoxy it back on but I think it's usefulness is likely ended. It may end up as a display piece as a reminder of my favorite father-in-law. And after I did a great job in flattening the iron and sharpening it. But I also noted as, Steven suspected, that their is likely a missing part for the 101 as I did notice a hole behind the front brass knob and that is likely where the adjuster would have pivoted to adjust the mouth. That piece I have never seen and may have been lost long ago. That iron I was able to determine the bevel as 25 degrees and the MKII jig held it just fine as the rion was long enough for substantial grip. What I used to hold this iron was I ave a piece of wood with 2 rare earth magnets flush with the wood to assist in holding the iron. For the tip that stuck out about 1 to 1.5" I used a small cut off of a slightly thicker wood so I could use my palm to push down on the iron and keep flat against the diamond stones (DMT). Otherwise I could see no way to protect my fingers from the stones. I had this issue the first time and made a mess of my hands before I even knew it. Lesson learned. Admittedly the magnets can cause a bit more work as the DMTs have metal in them but the extra work is easier for me than the very sore fingers and palms. Any suggestions on getting a good solid grip that helps the process along? Granted flattening the irons is a one time deal but it still has to be done and the old planes may or may not have been done already. I figure a quick run on the stone will tell you quickly if it's needed. And my 1st time into this I had both a set of new bench chisels, new set of mortise chisels, and several old bench planes that I had no idea about. That was a ton of sharpening for a 1st timer. Actually I think the mortise chisels aren't done yet. You know that shoulder thingy still.......and then there's my turning tools but I do have a Wolverine jig and 2 CNB wheels on my low speed grinder. One is a Megasquare 180 and and the other is a 600 4-in-1 from https://woodturnerswonders.com/products/mega-square-radius-edge-pair-cbn-wheels
  13. Gene my wife can do what she wants as long as she does it. I actually think that would be a great benefit in a wife, someone who will do the finishing side of things, as long as the finish is both our tastes. I'm not a finishing kind of guy. Build em and use em. Of course that's for the shop. If I had a good spray unit that might be a different story. The one regret and something I need to go back on is the trim on the miter station. I should have used a round over bit as I have very little collagen left in my arms so I both bruise and get skins teras easily. I'd be transporting a patient to the hospital and reach through a small doorway to the 02 tank and end up bleeding more than the patient. Most times I don't realize it till I either see the look on the patients face or feel it dripping. I've very careful around my sharp tools.........Of course by now I've had to give up on the rescue squad between both knees and the shoulder replacements. But I'm fun at the airport and court. Thanks for the replies guys, at least I feel more regular....not that way, although that's not necessarily a bad thing at my age but you guys know what I mean......ya know
  14. So as I've been building storage in the shop I have yet to put any kind of finish on well anything. I've built a few wall hung cabinets, a router table, a smaller drill cabinet, the outfeed table, a rolling cabinet that holds and stores the Kreg Foreman, the miter station, and rolling clamp cart. And then a few jogs like the crosscut sled and so on but haven't put nay finish on anything yet. Is this normal, personal choice, or otherwise not wise? I admit I'm not the best at putting a finish on anything that isn't for the formal part of the house but that's a two part thing. 1st I'm not all that thrilled about the finishing process and 2nd I'm not always sure it's really needed. On formal pieces I see the value in both finished look and protection plus it usually will bring out the characteristics of the wood itself such as grain and features. For the shop I'm not sure what I gain other than additional work. Can someone chime in on what is most appropriate? Am I just lazy or is it simply a personal choice? Are there real world advantages in putting finish on shop storage and jigs? As for the sliding jigs I do wax the runners and such as well as keep a good finish on my metal tables (table saw, band saw, jointer, planner, and so on)

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