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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
John Morris

Good Monday Morning Patriot Woodworkers! October 22, 2018

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Weekend: Was marred somewhat by the "tropical" force winds on Saturday. Six+ hours w/o electricity, but no damage; lots debris in the yard to clean up. Family returned safely from Florida late Saturday also. Sunday was church, couple of errands after and mainly a day of rest.

 

New Week: Back to normal routines; football season extended one more week as a round 1 sectional winner; swimming season practice starts tonight plus girls have practice tonight for the HS Powder Puff football game tomorrow night:P so plenty of windshield time. Haircut then lunch w/ my brother on Wednesday. Cleaning up the yard, mowing and other outside work will be the major event. Shop time is getting more limited due to colder weather setting in early. Likely my biggest challenge will be remembering to return the toilet seat to the down position after "Fall Bachelor Week.":rolleyes:

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3 hours ago, John Morris said:

Giant Sequoia or Bigtree is the mightiest and oldest of all living things

 

and here I always thought it was Bristlecone Pines...

 

The term bristlecone pine covers three species of pine tree (family Pinaceae, genus Pinus, subsection Balfourianae). All three species are long-lived and highly resilient to harsh weather and bad soils. One of the three species, Pinus longaeva, is among the longest-lived life forms on Earth. The oldest Pinus longaeva is more than 5,000 years old,[1] making it the oldest known individual of any species.

Despite their potential age and low reproductive rate, bristlecone pines, particularly Pinus longaeva, are usually a first-succession species, tending to occupy new open ground.[2] They generally compete poorly in less-than-harsh environments, making them hard to cultivate.[2] In gardens, they succumb quickly to root rot.[3] They do very well, however, where most other plants cannot even grow, such as in rocky dolomitic soils in areas with virtually no rainfall.[2]

Bristlecone pines grow in scattered subalpine groves at high altitude in arid regions of the Western United States. The name comes from the prickles on the female cones.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristlecone_pine

https://www.britannica.com/plant/bristlecone-pine

 

 

why aren't links embedding any more w/o extra effort???

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52 minutes ago, John Morris said:

I stole this beaut for 75 bucks, I am very happy.

you should be...

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the usual ignore another Monday day...

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40 minutes ago, Ron Dudelston said:

That is, when I’m not doing the whole election board duties business. 

Thanks for your service doing so!

Edited by Grandpadave52

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Had dinner Saturday with my siblings and managed some shop time yesterday.  Put some finish on the angel ornaments and fount the second part to the halos and glued them together.  Was cold and rainy yesterday.

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1 hour ago, Stick486 said:

the usual ignore another Monday day...

 

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Or,

 

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3 hours ago, Stick486 said:

and here I always thought it was Bristlecone Pines...

I agree Stick, we've been over this before, they are the oldest living organism on earth, right?

But perhaps what the original author of American Woods was stating, perhaps the Sequoias is earliest tree in existence? So perhaps the Sequoias were on this earth before the Bristle Cone? Yet they don't live as long as the Bristle Cone.

Just thinking out loud is all. Also keep in mind that Wiki category "American Woods" is a direct interpolation from a book published in 1951, so perhaps some things have been learned since then.

 

I'd like to delve into that one, which tree was here first, Bristle Cone, or Sequoia?

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23 minutes ago, John Morris said:

I agree Stick, we've been over this before, they are the oldest living organism on earth, right?

But perhaps what the original author of American Woods was stating, perhaps the Sequoias is earliest tree in existence? So perhaps the Sequoias were on this earth before the Bristle Cone? Yet they don't live as long as the Bristle Cone.

Just thinking out loud is all. Also keep in mind that Wiki category "American Woods" is a direct interpolation from a book published in 1951, so perhaps some things have been learned since then.

 

I'd like to delve into that one, which tree was here first, Bristle Cone, or Sequoia? 

sorry.. read it differently...

I think the earliest trees were the fern trees... 3~400 million years ago...

now for the who's on 1st tree (Sequoias or Bristle Cone)... time to go look/see...

would the Aspen figure in here some place because of the root system and how that tree spreads.. ie; the grove on the CO/UT border that is suppose to be like 80,000± years old...

 

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pando_(tree)

 

Pando (Latin for "I spread out"), also known as the Trembling Giant,[1][2] is a clonal colony of an individual male quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) determined to be a single living organism by identical genetic markers[3] and assumed to have one massive underground root system. The plant is located in the Fremont River Ranger District of the Fishlake National Forest at the western edge of the Colorado Plateau in south-central Utah, United States, around 1 mile (1.6 km) southwest of Fish Lake.[4] Pando occupies 43 hectares (106 acres) and is estimated to weigh collectively 6,000,000 kilograms (6,600 short tons),[5] making it the heaviest known organism.[6][7] The root system of Pando, at an estimated 80,000 years old, is among the oldest known living organisms.[8][9]

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There's a lot of those Quaking Aspens around here. None real close to me. They seem to like to live within a certain range of elevation. At our 5600', we may be to low. But, just a few hundred feet higher, they're prolific. Plus, where they do grow gets more rain than us. That could be a factor.

 

Just wondering...those really gnarly short pines that grow along Route 1 in N. California...are they Bristle cones? They're protected, aren't they?

 

 

Edited by Gene Howe

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree

 

The earliest trees were tree ferns, horsetails and lycophytes, which grew in forests in the Carboniferous period. The first tree may have been Wattieza, fossils of which have been found in New York State in 2007 dating back to the Middle Devonian (about 385 million years ago). Prior to this discovery, Archaeopteris was the earliest known tree.[91] Both of these reproduced by spores rather than seeds and are considered to be links between ferns and the gymnosperms which evolved in the Triassic period. The gymnosperms include conifers, cycads, gnetales and ginkgos and these may have appeared as a result of a whole genome duplication event which took place about 319 million years ago.[92] Ginkgophyta was once a widespread diverse group[93] of which the only survivor is the maidenhair tree Ginkgo biloba. This is considered to be a living fossil because it is virtually unchanged from the fossilised specimens found in Triassic deposits.[94]

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I believe the Sequoias have it...

finding when the Bristlecone 1st appeared is proving to be a bit more elusive...

https://www.giant-sequoia.com/about-sequoia-trees/about-sequoia-trees/

 

Sequoiadendrons can be traced to the Triassic Period 200 million years ago when dinosaurs first appeared. Sequoiadendrons were the dominant tree in North America and Europe during the Jurassic Period (180 to 135 million years ago) and the Cretaceous Period (35 to 70 million years ago). Dinosaurs disappeared near the end of the Cretaceous Period but the Sequoiadendrons lived on.

 

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14 minutes ago, Gene Howe said:

Plus, where they do grow gets more rain than us. That could be a facto

they are thirsty...

 

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46 minutes ago, Stick486 said:

Sequoiadendrons can be traced to the Triassic Period 200 million years ago when dinosaurs first appeared.

that may be where the author was going with that statement.

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