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John Morris

Lie Nielsen No. 51 Shooting Plane

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Thanks for the video. I could only afford one of theirs and one LV. Both Christmas presents.

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2 hours ago, Gerald said:

We John I just decided to collect the original Stanley and have at least one of each even number from 3 to 8. And then there all those others like plough planes , pattern planes. one transition plane (one is more than enough) and some more stuff I put in the plane category.

What an awesome collection!!!!! I love the old Stanley's, specially the flat top bedrocks. Been seeing some beautiful almost NOS Stanley's on eBay a whole bunch lately. If you need to round out your collection now would be a great time at the good ol eBay store.

What is your favorite favorite go to plane Gerald, which one do you reach for mostly?

Pictures pictures!:)

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1 hour ago, steven newman said:

Hmmm....I MIGHT have to keep my plane til under lock & key.....:ph34r:

Specially if I'm in your neighborhood Steve!

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On 10/18/2018 at 5:14 AM, Gerald said:

I usually go to my #3 for quick stock removal since mostly I a making a wide board narrow. My low angle LV is also a fav. 

They are pretty Gerald. That LV low angle is a dream I bet. I have a No. 7 Low Angle Jack by LV, and it can tame wild grain like nothing! I have the low angled LV block plane too that I love, great on end grain. Lee Valley is a great tool, is that one you have a low angle block with the large size handle? Thanks for sharing Gerald, wonderful collection!

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11 hours ago, John Morris said:

They are pretty Gerald. That LV low angle is a dream I bet. I have a No. 7 Low Angle Jack by LV, and it can tame wild grain like nothing! I have the low angled LV block plane too that I love, great on end grain. Lee Valley is a great tool, is that one you have a low angle block with the large size handle? Thanks for sharing Gerald, wonderful collection!

Got the plane first and then added the handle. Sure is nice for end grain too

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1 hour ago, Gerald said:

Got the plane first and then added the handle. Sure is nice for end grain too

I have the block plane, now I have to add that handle! It just seems it would much easier to plow through end grain with the leverage of the handle added. When I use my LV block plane, for end grain, I really still have to push, even with a micro blade exposed, that being said the cut is supreme, once I get it pushed through, but having that handle I bet would be the bees knees. Thanks for sharing that one Gerald, headed over to LV right now!

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So, are there a lot of difference in wood planes? I thought they are just holders for a blade. So, what's the great difference in how a Stanley or Fulton or Craftsman, or maybe a Buck Brothers with a sharp blade and set just right going to shave wood? I have no LN or LV, so I cannot compare them to all the different ones I do have.

SO, ARE 

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3 hours ago, oldwoodie said:

So, are there a lot of difference in wood planes? I thought they are just holders for a blade. So, what's the great difference in how a Stanley or Fulton or Craftsman, or maybe a Buck Brothers with a sharp blade and set just right going to shave wood? I have no LN or LV, so I cannot compare them to all the different ones I do have.

SO, ARE 

Jim The whole deal is like the difference between that Dormeyer drill from the 50's with the aluminum housing and a Festool drill. LV and LN are heavier or you could say solid construction. By being built that way the have less chatter so get a smooth cut easier. I agree some of it is overkill and if you know how to sharpen, set the blade and accommodate the grain:: then the difference is not as huge. But if you do not know all that stuff there will be a large difference.

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As a sidebar planes can be tweaked to improve performance. I bought a Stanley #8 which had been upgraded with a Hock blade and I upgraded a #7 with a pinnacle blade. Both work very well and it was much an improvement on the #7 when I changed it.

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Just did a little research.

 

Average annual salary of a skilled worker in 1900 was $449.80

 

Average salary of a skilled worker in 2017 was $44,500

 

In 1902 the cost of a Stanley No. 4 was $2.90 and 0.64% of that annual salary in 1900.

 

Today the cost of a Lie Nielsen No. 4 is $350.00 and 0.78% of that annual salary in 2017.

 

I'd say those LN's are a pretty good deal still today.

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