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Larry Buskirk

"Poor Soul" Stanley Bailey No. 22 Smoothing Plane

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From the depths of the "Dungeon Warehouse Basement" in Milwaukee Wisconsin, we have this "Poor Soul" of a Stanley Bailey No. 22 Smoothing Plane.


ning-100-0630-946-49.jpg?width=750


This "Poor Soul" spent the last few years in the bottom drawer of a filing cabinet that was in the basement of a warehouse in Milwaukee that flooded 4 or 5 years ago.


There were several planes in this drawer, and this one survived in the best condition.


I did a little research, and found that Stanley made these planes from 1870-1943.


I believe this one dates from the end years of production due to the Stanley Tools decal on the side of the wood sole.


ning-100-0632-946-14.jpg?width=750 I couldn't quite make the decal out, but I believe this photo from ebay is what it's supposed to look like.


ning-5711-946-76.jpg?width=750


As you can imagine having been submerged is going to make this one a bit of fun to bring back.


I'm in the process now of trying to dry the Boxwood sole out without it totally splitting, etc.


ning-100-0634-946-33.jpg?width=750


I found during my research, that this is not one of the popular "Collector" planes, but I'm going to give restoring it a go anyway. 


The price was right $0.00, so I won't lose anything trying.


This will be my first attempt at restoring a hand plane, so I may as well start out with a good challenge.


So any advice from the "Plane Experts" in going about saving this "Poor Soul" will be appreciated.


 


Larry


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That'll be a nice addition to the workshop- or for a neat display piece.




Lew Kauffman-
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Thanks Lew,


I thought it was pretty cool when I found it, I also thought it was older than it is.


The metal parts will be the easy part, I'll do the electrolysis process for their clean up.


I'll use Rust-Oleum Hammered Black for refinishing the metal parts. 


I'm hoping the wood sole doesn't split as it dries out. I'm not sure what to refinish it with.


I intend to return it to user status.



 
Lewis Kauffman said:


That'll be a nice addition to the workshop- or for a neat display piece.




Lew Kauffman-
Wood Turners Forum Host
Rolling Pin photo crop3_zps88fb0af9.jpg?width=100
Time Traveler and Purveyor of the Universe's Finest Custom Rolling Pins!



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Get a big tub of BLO, and soak the wood for awhile.    Just let it soak up as much oil as it can.    You can always wipe off the excess later.  



Add some wax to another batch of BLO, and wipe that on as a finish.    Plain old candle wax gets rubbed onto the sole. 




Planer? I'm the 'planer', and these are what I use...

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Steve,


Should I wait for the wood to dry out first?


It's got moisture coming out of it now. The drawer it was in still had water in it.


I've got it clamped in a drill press vise now, hoping to keep it from splitting worse than it already has.


I may have to force some glue into the cracks it has now.

steven newman said:


Get a big tub of BLO, and soak the wood for awhile.    Just let it soak up as much oil as it can.    You can always wipe off the excess later.  



Add some wax to another batch of BLO, and wipe that on as a finish.    Plain old candle wax gets rubbed onto the sole. 




Planer? I'm the 'planer', and these are what I use...



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That is a nice find Larry. I don't care that the collectors don't like them, I do. It's still old and it survived even if under water.

They usually tell you not to oil them, but in this case I agree with Steve, when it dries out soak it with BLO and maybe later when it dries out put some paste wax on it.



John Moody
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“Don’t make something unless it is both necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful, don’t hesitate to make it beautiful.†Shaker Saying


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John,


I was actually surprised that the "collectors" tend to overlook them.


I think the wood soled planes have a cool character to them.


Being submerged must have preserved the metal parts, everything came apart easily! No rusted solid screws.


I was watching another No. 22 on ebay earlier, it was listed at $0.01 with free shipping. The auction closed with no bidders.
 
John Moody said:


That is a nice find Larry. I don't care that the collectors don't like them, I do. It's still old and it survived even if under water.

They usually tell you not to oil them, but in this case I agree with Steve, when it dries out soak it with BLO and maybe later when it dries out put some paste wax on it.



John Moody
Site Administratorning-johnmoodywoodworkslogo2-948-83.jpg?http://www.johnmoodywoodworks.com
“Don’t make something unless it is both necessary and useful; but if it is both necessary and useful, don’t hesitate to make it beautiful.†Shaker Saying




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I know it is really strange to me. I was reading about them on one collector site and he said all they were good for is firewood. I totally disagree. I think they have just as much character to them as the metal ones do. I like to imagine the woodworker that had it and think of what he made using it. Wood planes have been around for a long time. That one is really neat that the decal has lasted on the side.



I have a Stanley No.5 that has that same decal on the handle. It doesn't have all of it but enough to know what it is.




Larry Buskirk said:


John,


I was actually surprised that the "collectors" tend to overlook them.


I think the wood soled planes have a cool character to them.


Being submerged must have preserved the metal parts, everything came apart easily! No rusted solid screws.


I was watching another No. 22 on ebay earlier, it was listed at $0.01 with free shipping. The auction closed with no bidders.
 
John Moody said:



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