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rlpeterson

Need to fill knot holds and wood defects

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Hello, 

 

I am to the stage of finishing the kitchen cabinets I have been making for my sister ski condo. In the first time in my woodworking life, I have purposefully attempted to contain as many knots in the wood to make it rustic. The wood I have used to make them is rustic hickory. I need to fill most of the knots before I can finish with a clear coat. I have seen some YouTube videos of filling gaps with black tinted epoxy. This is what I know; you put tape on the back of the board to keep the epoxy in the gap and mix up black epoxy and pore it in the knots or gaps. Has anyone out there done this? I need some pointers where to get the epoxy and the black colorant. 

 

Best regards, 

 

Ron

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I use a bit of the 5 minute epoxys. Every brand made seems to be the same. Only mix enough to get it in the holes fast for it will not wait for you to get that last swig of coffee.. For added colors I use powdered mixes from Hobby Lobby.

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I use a two part epoxy called Clear Cast from Hobby Lobby for small jobs. While you're there, grab a small tube of artist's acrylic paint. Tape the back, as you said and, mask around the hole(s). The Clear Cast I use is mixed at a 1to1 ratio so, you'll need three cups. Mark two at the same height. Pour part 1 in the first cup and part 2 in the other. I use the small red plastic cups. Solo brand, maybe. Then pour each in to the third cup. Using a tongue depressor or popsicle stick, scrape each cup out thoroughly. Add a small drop of the paint. Then mix according to directions. Watch the pour carefully. It'll likely sink as it soaks into the wood. So, mix a bit more than you think you'll need initially. Have a heat gun or small torch handy. If you see bubbles, lightly pass the heat over them. Keep watching for bubbles. I usually allow 24 hours for curing.

Finally, sand to 220 over all the door and finish as you normally would. 

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On 3/22/2019 at 10:36 AM, Gene Howe said:

Have a heat gun or small torch handy. If you see bubbles, lightly pass the heat over them.

Beware it's not the heat that takes the bubbles away.

It's the carbon monoxide from the flame that takes the bubbles away.

Not good to use a heat gun...

 

I'm cheap. I mix saw dust and glue to fill the holes. I then take a black

marker and draw circles around the patch to make it look like a knot. 

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