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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

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Gary Hanscom -
Michael Thuman -
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Greetings all. Quick question here ( I hope). I am building a butcher block rolling island for my daughter (which many of you helped me with in the design stage).

During the thickness planing stage on the butcher block top, I got a couple small tear out spots which are too deep to sand out. I was thinking that I could fill the depressions

with some epoxy. I have never had to use epoxy and am looking for any suggestions any of you may have as to any preferences you may have. Don't need more than a tablespoon

so no large quantity needed. And will epoxy take mineral oil "finish" ok?

Thoughts? And as always, thank you in advance for any assistance.

Gary

 

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2 hours ago, DAB said:

this is why you don't plane end grain.  or if you do, you glue on sacrificial end boards that prevent the tear out.

I am making it with edge grain...maple.

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Epoxy will work fine. You might add a bit of colorant to it. IMO, the colored epoxy looks better than clear. A tiny bit on the end of a toothpick will be enough. Stir it well on your pallet. 

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Edge grain, John. But the concept is the same. Might even be easier to match the grain.

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Here's a thought.  Maybe an inlay, similar to what John Morris was suggesting.  There are different shapes of inlays available, and you could possibly use a contrasting wood.  Then maybe pick two or three different places to insert an inlay.  Although not needed, they would look like the original inlay, along with the additional ones, were an intentional design element instead of a repair.   

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I have only one concern is the proposed peice a cutting board or food prep.  If so is cured expoxy human consumable.

If you want a finish that is durable and eatable try shellac.  

Once ploy and other finishes cure completely they are considered harmless but as others mentioned.

BLO has some metals in it that you do not want in food contact.

Poly is platic and never want to consume it.

Laq is another animal all together.

Please if you are going to finish this use salid bowl oil or shellac only.

 

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