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Also a very important suggestion......when a Dewalt starts knocking the way to stop the knock is to go inside of the machine and take the long rods loose and its been so long, I forgot either loosen a few rounds or tighten a few rounds of the rods.. What you are doing is changing the cutting stroke.

So ......If you didn't measure the exact length of each rod you might have a machine that won't saw when it gets back together.  Like I said this scroll saw is no walk in the park thing..

  So if that scroll saw is not knocking when you bought it chances are he didn't get around to using it like he had planned so the parts didn't get that chance to wear down any??

  

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17 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

You confused me to start with. Delta and Dewalt might look alike and all the parts are close to being the same but I believe I would tear it down carefully and lay all the things out in order and check all the bearings. They might have copied the 788 exactly except for just the bearings and they might have changed them just a bit ?? I bought my 788 in the first part of 2000 and it is a type 1 then they went to type 2 some years later by changing where they were made.. Did they up date any parts in that process??  I will say getting in to the 788 and then putting it back together is no walk in the park thing....I have greased everything that moved each time but you better have a large very clean area to do all this...And I didn't see anything that needed to be replaced except where the blades are attached. Sometimes a person tightens down too much and sort of crushes the swivel  end where the little o ring stays and this is the only thing I would replace but for some reason they are not available from Dewalt. Also most of the extra fast movement of the parts are exposed so some lube there always helps..then you gotta watch out for drops of oil ruining some nice looking wood you just spent days cutting out.

  My dewalt gets used more than any three of the other machines I have so yes it might should be checked more often..  And what Dave had a picture of the rod with the bearings being pressed in that rod I think should be bought as a unit and not try to pry them out and press new ones back in. 

 

Research, says, ALL of the bearings and bushings are the same. Delta/DeWalt, type 1 or 2, they are exactly the same. They all use these same bearing and bushings.

 

If you know anything about oil/greases you will know that not all oils/greases act the same. This is why there are more than just one type of grease. Most of the folks who I researched recommended Valvoline Synthetic grease. Unlike most oils/greases it migrates towards heat instead of away, so it doesn't get slung off.

 

Potatoes, patato...if you have any mechanical ability, know what you are doing, and pay attention, there is no reason to NOT press in new bearings. Any person who claims to be a mechanic or MRM (machine repair mechanic ) should know and be able to do that operation successfully. I've been doing this for over 50 years. In all of that time I only screwed up ONE bearing. Turned out the bearing was out of spec and had nothing to do with my abilities. Fortunately, the rod wasn't damaged and a new bearing was promptly installed.

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I forgot what it was I was to say and that is don't  change the lengths of any of the rods for one or two turns can get you in trouble with the running of the machine.

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Just now, Smallpatch said:

Sorry I butted in. Don't get up set...

I'm not upset, I was just trying to build on what you said, Jess. Providing accurate information for someone to read down the road is important.

 

I have done my research and there is a ton of information out there. All I wanted was what was missing...the bearing part numbers. I now have those numbers.

 

I have been tearing apart and rebuilding motors and equipment since I was single digits old. I would think, that, my knowledge and abilities count for something.

 

So, please, don't you get upset.

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21 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

I forgot what it was I was to say and that is don't  change the lengths of any of the rods for one or two turns can get you in trouble with the running of the machine.

Now to carry on the conversation...

 

What rod are you referring to? There are only two "links", with identical fixed lengths, and apparently, the tension rod. The tension rod is the only threaded rod that I found in the parts diagrams.

 

I can see where altering the length of the rod could increase/decrease the stress on the link arms. Is this what you are referring to...?

Edited by schnewj

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1 hour ago, schnewj said:

If you know anything about oil/greases you will know that not all oils/greases act the same.

will these PDF's help any???

 

electric-motor-bearing-lubrication-guide.pdf

lubrication_guide.pdf

MOTOR BEARING LUBE GUIDE.pdf

REDUCING BEARING FAILURES.pdf

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5 hours ago, Stick486 said:

...of course they'll help. Lots of good information there if you bother to read and understand. Although not 100% applicable to the SS lubrication, it provides a lot of great, general, education.

 

Thanks as always for sharing all of this fantastic information you have squirreled away in the "Library".

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