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Wichman3

attaching a back

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So how do y'all attach a backing to a fretwork piece?

   Specifically, how do you apply the adhesive so that it dosen't get on the finished sides? Additionally I would like to use a waterproof glue (Welcome sign for the front door), polyurethane comes to mind but it seems to be pretty messy and ugly if too much is applied.

Thoughts?

 

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Like Stick suggested, judicious application of glue. Maybe TB III, since it will be exposed to the weather. I've used a Veterinarian's hypodermic syringe for jobs like this. 

However you decide, it's going to be a gorgeous piece. 

Edited by Gene Howe

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I'm slow and don't quite understand when you say backing to a fret work piece. What steps do you take when starting to attaching a pattern to a piece of wood...

 After the wood is ready I then apply clear packing or shipping tape to cover the wood...I then spray temporary spray stickum to cover all the tape.. I then apply the pattern.. I have found spraying the tape instead of the back of the pattern gives me less screw ups like one time the pattern folded together and I could not get it apart so I had to go and print another before continuing..I also find Scotch brand tape does not leave as much sticky stuff of the wood as you start to remove the tape. Duck brand is cheaper but it seemded to leave half of the stickum on the wood so I still had to use lacquer thinner in the end..Which was the reason for the clear

 tape to start with..Years ago I use to spray the wood then apply the tape but then I had to soak the pattern with lacquer thinner to remove the pattern and the stick crap.. Scotch brand has lots of qualities of clear tape shipping, packing, storing On some I like the thickest for it doesn't tear as easy when trying to remove it.

  I don't understand the mention of super glue for scroll sawing and patterns someone mentioned??

  You will notice some sticky spots where you stayed in one place with the blade running too long and getting the tape hot and melting some of the glue. I use a damp lacquer thinner rg to clean that up.

  The clear tape and spray glue will lube the running blade a little a make the blades last a little longer . 

    On all my projects when thin wood is used like on the fret clocks and things I always cut two of all the projects by attaching two pieces of wood together with small brads together. I also leave about 1/4" sticking out past the pattern for two reasons. One to have something to help turn the wood as I am guiding it along the line. Then when finished cutting that piece of wood out a pair of pliers knows where to pull to separate the pieces of wood.IMG_1598.JPG.ce0f65c5977d4482fc816a5c89404245.JPG

I use to buy my patterns from Wildwood Designs.  I would then take the patterns to a printing shop and have them make four copies of each piece of the clocks... Four copies is all they were allowed to make of a bought pattern???  Why, I don't know.. This way I could file away the original pattern for later use and use two of the patterns, one to cut up to use on the wood and one to go by as I was building the clock for guidance to make sure I attached the pieces where they actually went and not where I thought they should go.. Never ever use the pattern you bought except to take and have more copies made... 

  I still have just about all the big clock patterns Wildwood sold from 1999 to 2006.

Cutting two pieces of 5/16" hard wood at once actually was better for me than one piece for the new blade would try to take off and go places on thin wood before I wasn't ready for it to go  so the two pieces actually made me slow down just bit and the results was much better...

  I would cut all of the clock patterns pieces to size at once. Making two clocks at a time saves lots of labor and only one set of holes are required...

  I also found one should not spray the stickum on till the day he will cut that piece out for waiting a few days after the glue was sprayed on and you will see why they call it temporary spray glue.The pattern will start to come off as you are sawing.

 I keep the clear tape in a box so it don't get dust all over the edges and it works much better being clean.448756750_goodplaceforthetape.jpg.0a221b68f1b596b3646eacff4bdd65fe.jpg

 

I used what ever spray glue is the best price when needed.407003320_IMG_9277sprayadhesives.JPG.ae3eee5dba46df7a320cb3b7510f35d6.JPG

 

I seem to buy more Elmer's than the rest.    Don't ever take the spray top off unless it is not spraying good then drop it in some lacquer thinner for a few minutes then test it to see if it will spray but leave it on the can all the time.. Leaving it off will let the stuff dry in the top of the can and make it harder to get clean!!

  Just spraying the wood with stickum and laying the pattern on that and it always took me way too much time to remove the pattern and all that stickum to get the wood clean and ready for the next step..

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2 hours ago, Wichman3 said:

CA glue weakens considerably if it is allowed to freeze.

Here is the piece I'm working on:

 

 

IMG_20190131_062353.jpg

My fault I didn't realize it would be outdoors. I hope the front of your house doesn't face the towards the west. My house does and the sun will destroy anything on the front door. I have used a pin nailer to attach backer boards to my cuttings. If you are going to frame it you can pin it around the edges and it will be hidden. The pin nails will not show much if out where they can be seen. 

 

PS- The "welcome sign" will be very attractive on your front door.

Edited by hawkeye10

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4 hours ago, Wichman3 said:

Here is the piece I'm working on:

You have the patience of Job to complete this piece. Not only the fretwork, but the continual disconnect/connect of the blade.

Certainly is going to be a beautiful sign when completed.

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Now I might have realized what you are asking.... well duh. After reading some answers helped...I'm not sure I would ever put any of my fretwork outside no matter what kind of a backing is used for there are too many areas for water to set there and destroy it. One thing you might think of is make a solution of Tightbond 111 and water and soak the whole thing a few times and let it dry before soaking again. It might be hard to find something more waterproof...And glue the backing on with tightbond 111..

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10 hours ago, hawkeye10 said:

My fault I didn't realize it would be outdoors. I hope the front of your house doesn't face the towards the west. My house does and the sun will destroy anything on the front door. I have used a pin nailer to attach backer boards to my cuttings. If you are going to frame it you can pin it around the edges and it will be hidden. The pin nails will not show much if out where they can be seen. 

 

PS- The "welcome sign" will be very attractive on your front door.

My front door is a southern exposure with a porch overhead, so the welcome sign will be protected from Sun and direct weather. My thoughts are to laminate the fretwork to a lighter colored  piece of wood underneath, I'm going to cut all the inside cuts first, then glue the two pieces together, then cut the outside. I'll be able to hide a couple of screws in the fretwork cutouts (to deter the local thieves).

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10 minutes ago, Wichman3 said:

My front door is a southern exposure with a porch overhead, so the welcome sign will be protected from Sun and direct weather. My thoughts are to laminate the fretwork to a lighter colored  piece of wood underneath, I'm going to cut all the inside cuts first, then glue the two pieces together, then cut the outside. I'll be able to hide a couple of screws in the fretwork cutouts (to deter the local thieves).

Wichita, I am looking forward to seeing the finished product. It's gonna look nice.

Edited by hawkeye10

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11 hours ago, Smallpatch said:

I'm slow and don't quite understand when you say backing to a fret work piece. What steps do you take when starting to attaching a pattern to a piece of wood...

 After the wood is ready I then apply clear packing or shipping tape to cover the wood...I then spray temporary spray stickum to cover all the tape.. I then apply the pattern.. I have found spraying the tape instead of the back of the pattern gives me less screw ups like one time the pattern folded together and I could not get it apart so I had to go and print another before continuing..I also find Scotch brand tape does not leave as much sticky stuff of the wood as you start to remove the tape. Duck brand is cheaper but it seemded to leave half of the stickum on the wood so I still had to use lacquer thinner in the end..Which was the reason for the clear

 

I want a backing piece the same outside pattern as the front (fretsawed) piece, so that I can mount it above my front door. Since I know that there are lowlifes living around here, I want to be able to screw the piece in place without the screws being glaring. I can't stack cut with my current saw (Delta 40-560 type 2, 2 speed) the lower blade bearing is too loose and I will break off small pieces on the bottom layer of a stack cut.

I started with double sided carpet tape to attack patterns (what  PIA) I currently use Duck brand clear self adhesive shelf liner applied first then the pattern to the shelf liner, this is working good so far. At my regular job we use a spray adhesive, a couple of years ago we got a bad case; it worked great as a temporary bond, we need a permanent bond, the boss (owner) let me take the 10 cans left home (that should last me awhile). Recently I bought one of the "spray handles" that snap onto spray cans to keep the adhesive off my grubby mitts; so far so good.

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9 hours ago, Wichman3 said:

I want a backing piece the same outside pattern as the front (fretsawed) piece, so that I can mount it above my front door. Since I know that there are lowlifes living around here, I want to be able to screw the piece in place without the screws being glaring. I can't stack cut with my current saw (Delta 40-560 type 2, 2 speed) the lower blade bearing is too loose and I will break off small pieces on the bottom layer of a stack cut.

I started with double sided carpet tape to attack patterns (what  PIA) I currently use Duck brand clear self adhesive shelf liner applied first then the pattern to the shelf liner, this is working good so far. At my regular job we use a spray adhesive, a couple of years ago we got a bad case; it worked great as a temporary bond, we need a permanent bond, the boss (owner) let me take the 10 cans left home (that should last me awhile). Recently I bought one of the "spray handles" that snap onto spray cans to keep the adhesive off my grubby mitts; so far so good.

I also use Duck brand clear shelf paper. It sure makes life easier.

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