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Found 35 results

  1. Just got a email from Woodcraft with a article on hand planes . Has some good info in it for those who know and especially those who do not . MASTERING THE HAND PLANE
  2. I ran across this collection of tips, tricks, jigs, etc from Mike Peace. He explains this is a rehash of some earlier tips that he thinks he didn't do a good a job of presenting them as he could. The video is about 31 minutes long. The video was listed on the September Woodturning Online Newsletter.
  3. I have the first edition and Jim Tolpin has written an updated version. I did not read the whole book, just looked at the pictures . Well I did read some because I have made several jigs from the books and still use them today. The jigs and other tips are very well illustrated and information is easy to understand to build the jigs. I would recommend this for anyone from newbie to experienced woodworker. He covers everything from tuneup , blades, jigs, crosscuts ripping , accessories, and grooves and dados and much more. You can get it as low as 1.99 at Barnes and Noble or 4.99 at Thrift Books. I have on my saw the magic fence pictured below. it can be added to for tenon jig that can do more than tenon.
  4. Like Ernie, my tool well became a junk catcher and I filled it in recently. A "Mil" is 0.001" the 4 mil is called the wet mil, and the resulting 1 mil is called the dry mil. Note this is sponsored by Waterlox. I took a class from Ernie 15 or so years ago. His shop is in a barn right across the road from the Boy Scout camp I went to years ago. Now a county park. Amish buggies still trot by on the road. https://www.waterlox.com/project-help/video?id=469e6831b68d431db75d2d4d355a93d1
  5. Thought it might be best to start off with what my current setup is or at least parts of it. My Dust collector is a Grizzly 1029 2 hp operating on 220v. It had a 5 micron bag top and bottom when purchased and was upgraded to a canister filter from Penn State. My collector is located in the attic of my shop in a insulated enclosure and a 12x24 filtered return to the shop. Power is controlled with a Long RAnger remote. Ducting I used is 4 inch thinwall PVC. We will get into ducting and turning corners later. I have limited amounts of Flex hose in 4 and 6 inch. My bblast gates are a combination of homemade and manufactured plastic gates of two types. Since the Dc is located in the center of the shop ducting goes out in a spider like orientation. Ducting to machines is split in several places by use of wyes and boxes (made from Shop Notes plans). I have a cyclone based on some plan I found somewhere and a control box on it based on Shop Notes plans expanded. I recently added a Dust Deputy cyclone and may do away with the wooden cyclone. DC Room under construction on the left. Chip collection box and ducts to DC in attic on right. Another view of lower ducts and chip box. Above is Dust deputy with connections turned on the lathe to adapt openings to 6 inch flex hose. Ducts attached to ceiling spread to machines from this point. Of note here it is best to keep Duct runs as short as possible and as straight as you can get them. Any turn should be gradual and not an immediate 90 degree. This can be done with purchased wide and ducts or put two 45 angles together with a short 4-6 inch piece of duct between them. More on this in the next entry about choosing and installing ducts and blast gates .
  6. This LINK takes you to a method to make holders for sanding discs for your drill. I will add to this you will need to add a pad to the holder and velcro . For gluing the pad ( garden knee foam works) on Shoe Goo works very well. For the velcro use either plain back and glue on or self adhesive. Also I shape mine with the wood being smaller than the sanding pad and then shape the foam on the lathe with a skew , kinda like a little funnel shape.
  7. This page has several tips and there are more pages to this tips section. Of note on the first page are the depth gauge, wire burner (always use handles for these) , and sawbucks. Some of the later pages are common sense and some like using wood chisels on a lathe I do not condone. So have a look and see what you can use and we can discuss usefulness . Wood Turning Tips - 1
  8. I know this may be ahead of some new turners but we have to keep this interesting for those ready to make the jump to hollowing. This ia a nice piece on hollowing that I think you will find interesting. Maybe next week we can do some history, must be someone out there who likes history. https://www.hiltonhandcraft.com/Articles/MakingAHollowForm.html
  9. We can get notifications of new posts on topics we have started reading. Would it be possible to get notifications on new tips that have been posted in the Tips sub-forums? Whatever form that took would be great. Either a notification on any tip posted, or one just on the forums in which we have demonstrated an interest. For example, I would be interested in seeing any new tips posted to the Turning forum, but the CNC forum wouldn't interest me as much. Either way would be fine, though.
  10. Gerald

    Club Meeting

    We had a great club meeting today and got some great tips from Mark Sillay. 1. Turning bowls end grain instead of side grain gives a whole different pwerspective. 2. When turning hollow form (end grain ) put CA around the inside of the neck opening and on the bottom of tenon. Spray accelerator inside to create barrier on bottom so the CA does not go thru and bowl will not crack. 3.When remounting a piece and is not running true . Leave the chuck slight loose and with lathe running slow place a gouge with flutes down over tool rest and lever the workpiece very gently till is true and then tighten chuck. 4.Use a Spindle Roughing Gouge with a steeper than 45 angle grind to act like a skew to smooth the outside of a bowl. This will be angled like a skew and rubbing the bevel. There was more but do not know how i could explain.
  11. I have possibly 200 little 2 and 3 inch sanding disks for making bowls. Grits from 60 to 3000. They are presently all stuck in little plastic bags by size and grit as I got them from the supplier. It would be great to file them somehow. Something like a recipe box with dividers, but much larger to handle more. I can come up with something, I am sure, with a shoebox, recipe box, etc. yet I'll bet someone else is ahead of me on this. I'm always up for simple, ingenious solutions. Robert
  12. While transferring the links on our old website came across this site . Lots of good stuff in this one place. Around The Woods
  13. So how do y'all attach a backing to a fretwork piece? Specifically, how do you apply the adhesive so that it dosen't get on the finished sides? Additionally I would like to use a waterproof glue (Welcome sign for the front door), polyurethane comes to mind but it seems to be pretty messy and ugly if too much is applied. Thoughts?
  14. Hope everyone is settling into the new year and you have had the chance to play with your new turning toys. Our Patriot Turners- Even though Christmas is over, @Ron Altier is still cranking out beautiful ornaments! Ron explained how he made this one in his post- @PostalTom gave us a heads up about a new online publication from the Woodworker's Journal. They have partnered with the American Association of Woodworkers for this new FREE publication! Click on the above image for more information and sign up for the publication! Last week I mentioned that I was working on some sanding improvements. @FlGatorwood added helpful comments about shop made inertia sanders. If you missed the ensuing conversation- "Capt. Eddie" has kits that include the magnetic ball bearing and a bronze sleeve available at his website. @Gerald posted a link he picked up from the AAW site. A lot of us have made spinning tops but these are extra special! Thanks, Gerald! I'm reposting it here- http://abctoupie.com/en/toupie-volante/ What’s Coming Up- If you are near Kansas City, MO this weekend, Check out the Easy Wood Tools demo with Brad McCalister! For The Newbies- A couple of information oriented videos- First, a short one about Scroll Chucks from Woodworker's Journal- Notice what a pain in the butt it is to change the jaws on the chuck in the video. Now if they had an Easy Wood Chuck ( @Jim from Easy Wood Tools ), the change can be made in seconds! And one from Mike Peace on tailstock maintenance- Expand Your Horizons- Drying bowl blanks can be a hit or miss proposition. Here is an article from Woodworker's Journal and Ernie Conover that offers several methods of bowl blank drying procedures. http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/options-for-drying-green-bowl-blanks/ In addition to the methods listed, I recently saw where Carl Jacobson was using rice to dry a blank. He indicated it took about 2 months between the rough turn and the finish turn. New Turning Items- A lot of turners use CA as a finish for there pens and other items. Here's a new CA type product that may be a little better. This "glue" doesn't harden until the activator is applied. http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/gluboost-adhesive-products/ Everything Else- A nice turning item that incorporates some extra skills. Mike Peace shows us how to turn a wooden pie server- Safe turning
  15. As mentioned before, the tips and tricks we mention here are personal choices and not gospel. We all have our particular ways of doing things that work for us. There are NO absolutes in scrolling. Sorry to have taken so long in getting the next Tips and Tricks our, folks. Life got in the way. Anyway, there has been some interest in how to make self-framing projects. This type of project is the art of using one piece of wood for both the picture AND the frame. For the demo, I have chosen a Sheila Landry design for the project. Without going into all the basics of choosing the wood, sanding, prep work, affixing the pattern, assume we have already done it. (Because this is a purchased pattern, I will not include all of the pattern here.) What I want you to notice is the "X" marked on the pattern and marked "Drill Entry Hole Here" Why there, you ask???? That is the point that we will start making our frame. The figure in the middle is going to be recessed by 1/4 to 3/8" around this line. Outside of this line will be the frame. When we make self-framing projects, we don't want any light to shine through our framing cut AND we want to make sure that we have a good glue area. To accomplish this task, we will need to use a "bevel" technique. That simply means that we change the angle of the blade to the wood. With most of the saws, you will tilt the table to change the angle of the cut. With the Excalibur saw, you will change the angle of the cutting head. Depending on the size of the blade you use, you will change the angle from 2 to 5 degrees. I know that we are talking about very small changes - - - - soooooooooooooooooooooo - - - - - the image below is that of a protractor. Feel free to copy this image or download your own by searching "protractor image" in your favorite search engine. When printing this image you change its size to suit. After printing, I glued mine onto scrap, and cut the outside. Be certain that the bottom of the image is flush with the bottom of your scrap. The next step that I personally recommend is to use a piece of scrap and cut some test areas as shown below. I label each area with the amount of angle on the blade. Also notice that I labeled the size of the blade. (OK, I mislabeled the #3 blade as #4). This seems to help me choose the amount of angle and size of blade by actually showing me how far the cut piece will move. The next step will be to drill the entry hole. Choose the smallest drill bit that you can for this entry hole as it will probably be seen (more on this later). Now - there are some differences of opinion in this step. some say that you can drill the hole at 90 degrees - in other words straight down - other say that you must drill the hold on your chosen angle. Try it both ways and see which way works best for you. Ready for the next step? Notice that nothing has been said yet about any cutting on the pattern itself. We will do that in a little while. OK - tilt your saw to the chosen angle of cut. At this point, it doesn't really make any difference which direction (if you saw will tilt both ways). Thread the blade through the hole and tighten the tension. I have a habit of a little over-tightening at this point because I don't want the blade to wander. NOW to decide which direction to cut. You are going to want the outside (frame) to fall out the bottom of the piece. This will eventually make the center piece depressed into the frame and the frame proud. When you are satisfied you are cutting in the right direction, do so. Slow and steady will make a great even cut. When you are finished, test fit the center by inserting it into the frame from the top. It should be something like the picture below. If all looks good, go ahead and glue the pieces together. Allow at least 8 hours to dry. After you are sure the pieces are cured, it's time for the next step. Using a carrier board, it is time to plane the back side. This step is not mandatory but I like to use it - makes for a more finished piece on the back side. (Shown in the picture below) Another thing that I will do at this time, because I have some nice firm wood to work with, is to route a 1/4" round-over around the inside of the frame. You can almost see that in the picture below OK - now it's time to cut out everything starting with the inside and working out to the frame. Below is what I ended up with. Notice that I also put a 1/4" round-over around the entire frame. Whatcha think, folks - ready to try "Self-Framing" projects..? ? ? ? ? ? Let's have some discussion here. Give it a try and post your results. And thanks for your participation.
  16. Again, Before we get started on this week's stuff, I'd like to remind you of the request from @Jim from Easy Wood Tools. The generous folks at Easy Wood Tools are decorating their lobby for Christmas and would like to use turned ornaments for the tree. The ornaments don't have to be finished. Plain wooden ones will be painted by volunteers at Easy Wood Tools. The ornaments can be simple turnings from non-descript wood. However, if you wish to make some fancy ones- think of the type made by @Ron Altier, @Gerald and @Steve Krumanaker- those would be displayed just as you made them-- No Paint!! If you need ideas, I have a list of websites, tutorials and ideas. Just let me know!!! Well Pennsylvania has set another record- We have had only 4 days without measurable rain since July 1. Gimme a break!!! Our Patriot Turners- Speaking of ornaments- @Ron Altier turned a beautiful blue and white colored plywood piece, although not without some problems- Ron describes what happened in his post and he received lots of feedback, too. @HandyDan is getting into the Christmas spirit with his gorgeous turned angel ornaments. He received lots of compliments and answered some questions, here- And, @Steve Krumanaker was super busy with his batch of awesome ornaments. And this is just a sampling of what Steve has done! Steve also explained his process for the finish on these, in his post- We've had a couple of questions this week from some of our members. @hawkeye10 is considering getting into turning. He asked our members what they would recommend. He received lots of comments. He is also eyeing a new-to-him lathe, from Craigslist and asked our members their thoughts on it. Head on over to his posts and help him out! @Bob Hodge posted a question in the finishing forum about turning and sandpaper grits. I am reposting it here in hopes our turners can chime in and give him some advice/help- What’s Coming Up- The Virginia Woodturning Symposium is in November- Click on the above image for additional information. Stuart Kent will be at the American Association of Woodturners in Raleigh, NC, November 2019. Click on the above image to go to Stuart's Facebook page for additional information. From The Internet- @Gerald Added a great video of an interview with Barry Todd and our good friend form Woodcraft, Frank Byers. If you watch the video, check out how Mr. Todd burnished a finial! I've been adding some short videos into the Woodturner's Tips section. So far , they have been from Mike Peace. If you see videos that offer tips on turning, please add them to the "Tips" section- don't forget to add tags to your entry! Everything Else- With all the rain, I've had a little time to play at the lathe making ornaments for @Jim from Easy Wood Tools. One of the shapes I could never master is a sphere. I know the mechanics and the math but what comes off of the lathe could never be considered round! I did't want to spend the $$ purchasing a jig that would only be used occasionally. One turner/"inventor" I really enjoy following is Mr. David Reed Smith. Checking his site, I found a technique for turning spheres using a shop made jig. The jig uses a shadow to check the turning progress. It consists of an adjustable platform sliding in a dovetail on a fixed base. The platform is secured with a screw that pulls the dovetail tight. I used a fender washer to prevent the screw from gouging the base. The fixed base is held on the lathe ways with magnets. The platform holds the "pattern". And the shadow is created by an Ikea LED lamp suspended over the turning. An alignment post is used to help position the lamp at the correct location. The blank is turned while watching the shadow on the pattern. The setup looks like- Harbor Freight has a small LED flashlight on sale. I'm trying to figure out how to use their magnetic base/arm to replace the Ikea suspended lamp. I think I'll need to get some metric tap and die stuff. If you are interested in Mr. Smith's jig, here is the web page with the instructions on making it- http://davidreedsmith.com/Articles/ShadowSphereJig/ShadowSphereJig.htm Safe turning
  17. I think your choice of blade for a particular job really is a personal choice with prior knowledge of your cutting habits. There are times where I will change sizes or type of blade during the cutting of a piece ! ie: long straight or slight curved lines vs tight inside cuts. Blade choice also depends on the speed of your saw, the thickness of the wood, and the hardness of the wood. OK - I don't think there is a hard and fast rule. Your style of cutting will choose your blade size and type.
  18. Do we have, or could have, a forum dedicated to tips? Not talking about fixes for problems brought up my our members, but just things we do in the course of our passion that it occurs to us might be of use to someone else. Not a separate one for each topic, as that could be labor intensive to set up, but we could lump woodworking, turning, scroll sawing, etc. together in one listing. Or is that already part of an existing forum that I just haven't found yet?
  19. found this elsewhere... might be of use to some... https://www.familyhandyman.com/woodworking/quick-and-easy-cabinet-doors/view-all/
  20. Short blog from Chris Schwarz on hand cut dovetails https://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/dovetailing-trick-beginners?k=O5aSyEQDrOJ71MtJucCkmub0UnqR%2BIUKrY3UU4gftQ8%3D&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&utm_campaign=pww-kbo-nl-180502-dovetails
  21. There some things on this one that I had to look closely. Very interesting
  22. If memory serves me right, someone ws saying that they are having trouble cutting straight lines - (I think that is all of us). I think this also goes with cutting large (i.e. >6" diameter) arcs. A couple of things I can think that I do is: Line my chair/stool up with the kerf - my blades tend to cut more on the right side, therefore, I line my chair/stool up to the right of center - in line with a "straight" cut kerf I don't change the position of my hands during the cut thereby "eliminating" changing dominance of one hand over the other I try to apply steady pressure during the cut - changing the pressure will cause blade characteristics to change the pull angle I don't rush - tends to enable minute changes in direction without causing a perceived crooked line There's my thoughts - how about your tips for cutting straight(er) lines? Appreciate any input guys. fred
  23. Cliff

    spoon gouge

    Just stumbled upon this
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