Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'tips'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • The Woodworking Discussion Forum
    • Introduce Yourself
    • General Woodworking
    • Wood Turners
    • Finishing
    • Wood Carving
    • Hand Tools
    • Scroll Sawing
    • CNC
    • Shopsmith
    • Show Us Your Woodworking Shops
    • Machinery, Tools, Research, Reviews and Safety
    • Plans and Software
    • The Veterans Corner and Causes Forum
  • The Old Machinery Discussion Forum
    • Old Machinery
  • The Home Improvement Forum
    • Home Improvement
    • Patio and Outdoors
  • The Scrap Bin
    • Free for All
    • The Classified, Swap and Sale
    • The Patriot's Pulse
    • Announcements
    • Network Tutorials
    • Bugs and Issues

Categories

  • Honoring the Fallen
  • Warrior's Christmas

Categories

  • Book and Literature
  • CNC Files
    • CAD Files
    • CAM Files
    • CNC Reference and Tutorials
  • General Woodworking
    • Shop Charts
    • Shop Jigs
    • Shop Furniture
    • Arts and Crafts
    • Furnishings
    • Musical Instruments
    • Wooden Toys
    • Yard and Outdoors
  • Home Improvement
  • Old Machinery Manuals
  • Old Machinery Badge & Decal Images
    • Beaver Power Tools-Callander Foundry
    • Delta Specialty Co.
    • Delta Mfg. Co.
    • Delta Milwaukee
    • Delta Rockwell
    • Walker Turner
    • Sears Companion
    • Sears Craftsman
    • Sears Dunlap
  • Sketchup Sharing Center
    • Furnishings
    • Shop Jigs
    • Arts and Crafts
    • Sketchup Tutorials
  • Scroll Saw Patterns

Blogs

  • Building A Walnut Shotgun Case
  • Military Challenge Coin Display Build
  • SJUSD Veterans Recieve Plaques from Patriot Tigers
  • The Pastor’s Table or I Think My Sister Is Trying To Buy My Way Into Heaven
  • Small Patch Musings and Such
  • Steve Krumanaker
  • Christmas 2016
  • Photography
  • Cherry Entertainment Center
  • Another Church Table
  • Inside Out Turning
  • Segmented Turning
  • Canon Ball Bed
  • Situation Normal, All Fired Up
  • DUST COLLECTORS 101
  • Workbench PIP
  • Republishing the French Rolling Pin blog
  • Thickness Sander
  • Shopsmith lathe setup
  • Drying Turned Wood
  • New Projects, shop stuff, new tools,
  • Bill Kappel
  • Bowl Drying Adventures
  • Chess set

Product Groups

  • Old Hand Tools
  • New Hand Tools
  • Freedom Caps
  • T-Shirts

Categories

  • Members
  • Sponsors
  • Administrators
  • Forum Hosts

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First Name


Last Name


My Location


My Woodworking Interests


My skill level is


Website URL


Favorite Quote


AIM


MSN


ICQ


Gmail


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Facebook URL


Twitter Feed URL


Twitter Feed URL


My Clubs and Organizations

  1. Ok, I know I am missing something here so I am going to ask the collective. What is the trick to turning two things that match? Earlier this week I turned a couple pegs for the patio chair I am working on and those went pretty well. They are within a couple hundredth of each other and there are no real curves to them as they need to contact the back in a level manner. Fast forward to doing a couple of shaker style pegs for the bottom of the back assembly. I cannot get these to match. After a couple days this is as good as it gets. I can see the difference but I don’t understand how with the same marking layout they can be so far from each other. The domes just aren’t the same curvature even though they are the same diameter and height, one is much flatter than the other. Is there a trick to getting these similar or do I just need to chuck them up and spend a couple hours trying to sand them to the same profile?
  2. A decent article on glues and techniques. I still have no love for Gorilla Glue 42-Glue Management-3.pdf
  3. Please don't forget about the fund raiser that our very generous sponsor- Easy Wood Tools- is currently having. Head on over to the EWT site and order yours today- https://www.easywoodtools.com/ Our Patriot Turners- @RustyFN Is making a fabulous lidded box for his Mrs. In his post, Rusty tells us about the material he used for the "metal" bands. What’s Coming Up- Click on the images for the links to more information and registration. These are from the AAW. If you catch this post in time, Cindy Drozda is having another live bottle stopper video. You can watch it on her YouTube channel- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5AR8MzQJOBs I picked this information from social media. Jeff Hornung, who does fantastic embellishment work, also does IRDs and demonstrations for clubs. For more information, contact him through his site, The Walnut Log. https://www.thewalnutlog.com/ For The Newbies- Jim Rodgers continues his video series on catches- Lyle Jamieson has made his "Tuesday's Tips" available on his YouTube channel- https://www.youtube.com/user/JamiesonLyle/videos Search his channel for "Tuesdays Tips" IF you use your worm screw, here is a useful addon that you can make to improve stability. If you are thinking about getting into turning but not sure what tools you might need, Richard Raffan discusses some traditional choices. Don't overlook the possibility of using carbide tipped tools as well. Expand Your Horizons- Scroll chucks hold your work firmly but can mar the piece and sometime be less that ideal for odd shaped pieces. In this video, Alan Stratton discusses creating soft, custom replacement jaws. Mike Waldt turns an earring stand from English Yew- Carl Jacobson turns a gorgeous maple burl lidded box- And yet another two piece scoop. This one from Mike Peace- New Turning Items- Save your lunch money! With SWAT happening in about a week, thee may be some new toys presented. Everything Else- Rick Turns list of YouTube woodturning videos from last week- I've been finding it really hard to get to the lathe lately. Life is funny that way. My lighting equipment for turning has been cobbled together from old desk lamps. They work but can sometimes be difficult to position and still be able to see what's happening. I saw a neat idea for a small LED light that helped overcome some of the disadvantages I was experiencing. Being a cheap scape frugal, I decided to build one. The parts If you have an old cell phone charger and cord, that's the perfect power supply. The other parts are a magnet- this ones is from an old computer hard drive. The LED light board- available from https://www.aliexpress.com/item/3256804164219166.html?spm=a2g0o.order_detail.0.0.2856f19c9S68hd . They were 6 boards for $1.00 plus $3.00 shipping and came all the way from China in 4 weeks!! Epoxy. Miscellaneous Harbor Freight stuff. Started by preparing the wire. Cut off the end that wasn't the standard charger USB connector. Removed the green and white wires. Added the shrink sleeving because I had a box from Harbor Freight. Stripped, tinned and knotted the wires on the board Soldered the wires to the LED board. The board has a miniature USB connector but I figured the solder would be more robust. Added a zip tie- because I had a bag from Harbor Freight- as a strain relief. Turned the board over and epoxied the magnet to the metal heatsink. I had to add a couple of washers between the magnet and heatsink to allow space where the wire passed thru the board. This allowed the LED board to sit flat. On the small tool rest- With the LED lamp off- LED lamp on- I'm happy but I think I'll build another one. I failed to take into consideration that the "chuck side" of the tool rests are not vertical. The light board angles "down" slightly. I think that can be fixed by adding a shim between the LED board back and the magnet before applying the epoxy. Also, if you have ever played with hard drive magnets, they are incredibly strong for their size. It is almost a struggle to get the lamp off of the tool rest. Regular rare earth magnets would probably work just as good. Safe turning
  4. Jeeze, half way thru June already! Our Patriot Turners- @RustyFN showed us a new vase he is turning. I really like the shape on this one. Check out his post for all the positive comments- As so often happens, a new turning requires an additional piece of equipment. Rusty's vase project needed a Steady Rest. The one he built looks awesome- Here's more and some comments- @Masonsailor created a beautiful base for a protective glass globe. The entire project displays a prized possession As always, Paul's post contain informative images about his processes. An update on an older thread about lathe tool sharpening. @Bob Hodge has added CBN wheels to his sharpening arsenal and had some questions about using the Wolverine system with the wheels. Please check out his post and offer any advice you can- What’s Coming Up- This Friday, June 17 2022, there will be a free Vendors Showcase Here's the link provided by Cindy Drozda- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41FJ5JM109M From the Art Of Turning- Link to more information- https://www.artofturning.com/?mc_cid=dee7298ffb&mc_eid=480d9e65bf For The Newbies- Some projects require the use of metal inserts to hold threaded utensils. In this video, Carl Jacobson show a neat way to install the inserts from Ruth Niles- A bowl turning video from Alan Stratton. What I found interesting in this one was the faceplate jig and the safety measures used when reverse chucking with the mortice. Not sure if everyone can view this video from Lyle Jamison, on Facebook. An interesting method of assuring a reverse chuck maintains the original centerline axis. https://fb.watch/dFPTsQz-05/ Expand Your Horizons- Several of our turners have made "gnomes" in the past. Here's another how-to video on making them. Check out the use of our sponsor's tools- @Jim from Easy Wood Tools!! Kent, from Turn A Wood Bowl, has an interesting video and discussion about turning and dust collection. New Turning Items- Some new information on the Kodiak Sharpening system from Woodturners Wonders- A special on Ruth Niles pizza cutters! https://nilesbottlestoppers.com/product/pizza-night-special-kit-2/ Recently we mentioned that Ron Brown had released a stabilizing device for hollowing bowls. Sam Angelo puts it through its paces Everything Else- Rick Turns list of YouTube woodturning videos from last week-
  5. Hey, Turners!!!! Please consider posting your projects- completed or in the process- in the Woodturners main forum! We want to have your work get the attention it deserves!!
  6. Our annual Adopt A Wounded Warrior campaign is going gangbusters! We are at about the 3/4 point in our goal. If you haven't made your pledge, please consider doing so in the next week. That gives our "Santa" a chance to do the necessary shopping to fulfill the Christmas wishes. Our Patriot Turners- Over the weekend, @forty_caliber posted one of his pecan bowl turnings. He added copper enhancements as a way to fill some voids. His post turned out to be one of the best conversations we have had in a long time, here in the Turner's Forum. I think you will find a lot of great comments that pertain not only to turning but also to creative thinking for any project. Another topic that crosses over from one forum to another was posted in the General Woodworking forum by @Gene Howe. Gene asked about our favorite wood species with which to work. Lots of great content and some super images. One of the images- @Bob Hodge is considering upgrading his lathe. His primary turning projects will be larger bowls, platters and hollow vessels. Bob asked the forum's thoughts on what might be a good lathe for his upgrade. Check out his post, our members comments and see if you can provide some input- Bob also took the time to share a couple of jewelry towers he has made. These would make excellent gifts for any wife or girlfriend (or both) who has a lot of bling! @Gerald updated us on the progress on some commissioned bowls. Looks like they are about ready to ship! Gerald also posed a question to the group asking if anyone had ever turned a full sized "Nut Cracker" soldier. None of members could really offer much in the way of useful information (although lots of wisecracks were offered up). If you have done this, or know someone that has, maybe you could help Gerald- @Ron Altier has been busy cranking out projects. The first one he showed us was some fantastic earrings. Ron has the awesome ability to combine the most gorgeous wood combinations- Ron also posted a new ornament he just finished! And speaking of ornaments, @Steve Krumanaker has made a bunch of birdhouses, Some of these are a new design for Steve and they are fantastic! He received lots of great comments and he offered additional information about how he makes the little birds. @Masonsailor is starting on his Christmas presents- I think I should take the hint! What’s Coming Up- If you are quick- Lyle Jamieson has an IRD, tomorrow (Thursday December 9, 2021), on turning natural edge, hollow forms. https://lylejamieson.com/product/december-9-2021700-930pm-eastern-time-thursday-natural-edge-hollow-form/ https://woodturningtoolstore.com/event/woodturners-retreat-six-turners-live-12-turnings-of-christmas/ For The Newbies- Hand made toys are always a treat for the little ones and with Christmas fast approaching this is a timely video from the AAW- We must be cautious when creating these, especially for those who might be thinking about chewing on the toys. The AAW has a short article with guidelines and some embedded links to more information- https://www.woodturner.org/Woodturner/Resources/Safety-Materials/Safety--Turning-Safe-Toys.aspx?_zs=ceDib&_zl=k8mr2 Lyle Jamieson has some tips on lathe speed- Expand Your Horizons- A live edge bowl from "Turn A Wood Bowl" Richard turning a little bowl. Just nice to watch his skills- New Turning Items- Craft Supplies USA has ornament kits available. A short video showing some of the products and turning a snowman. https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/t/62/Ornaments?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=description&utm_campaign=videos Ruth Niles has a new bottle stopper design. It is functional as a stopper as well as being able to show off the stopper top- Check it out at Ruth's site- https://nilesbottlestoppers.com/product/ss-1000/ Everything Else- Rick Turns list of last week's woodturning videos on YouTube-
  7. I have continued to scan my collection of Workbench Magazine plans for our guests and members to download from our Files Department, and I thought I'd share the Shop Tips section of the magazine as well. As is the case with my file downloads for plans from Workbench Magazine, the same applies here, I have received permission from the current Workbench Magazine to publish the old articles and plans on the open source web. Please see the collection of plans as well at https://thepatriotwoodworker.com/files/ Enjoy! These tips still apply to our work today, very cool!
  8. Work with Sketchup textures? Great video showing how to add, make and manipulate textures to your Sketchup models.
  9. I have continued to scan my collection of Workbench Magazine plans for our guests and members to download from our Files Department, and I thought I'd share the Shop Tips section of the magazine as well. As is the case with my file downloads for plans from Workbench Magazine, the same applies here, I have received permission from the current Workbench Magazine to publish the old articles and plans on the open source web. Please see the collection of plans as well at https://thepatriotwoodworker.com/files/ Enjoy! These tips still apply to our work today, very cool!
  10. Thought it might be best to start off with what my current setup is or at least parts of it. My Dust collector is a Grizzly 1029 2 hp operating on 220v. It had a 5 micron bag top and bottom when purchased and was upgraded to a canister filter from Penn State. My collector is located in the attic of my shop in a insulated enclosure and a 12x24 filtered return to the shop. Power is controlled with a Long RAnger remote. Ducting I used is 4 inch thinwall PVC. We will get into ducting and turning corners later. I have limited amounts of Flex hose in 4 and 6 inch. My bblast gates are a combination of homemade and manufactured plastic gates of two types. Since the Dc is located in the center of the shop ducting goes out in a spider like orientation. Ducting to machines is split in several places by use of wyes and boxes (made from Shop Notes plans). I have a cyclone based on some plan I found somewhere and a control box on it based on Shop Notes plans expanded. I recently added a Dust Deputy cyclone and may do away with the wooden cyclone. DC Room under construction on the left. Chip collection box and ducts to DC in attic on right. Another view of lower ducts and chip box. Above is Dust deputy with connections turned on the lathe to adapt openings to 6 inch flex hose. Ducts attached to ceiling spread to machines from this point. Of note here it is best to keep Duct runs as short as possible and as straight as you can get them. Any turn should be gradual and not an immediate 90 degree. This can be done with purchased wide and ducts or put two 45 angles together with a short 4-6 inch piece of duct between them. More on this in the next entry about choosing and installing ducts and blast gates .
  11. Okay I'm running into a couple minor problems. I basically ruined a piece playing with the new jaws but that's okay. I was prepared for that. A new piece is being glued up and getting ready to be worked hopefully for later this evening. How ever I'm running into a slight bit of a problem and am in need of some advice. I've been using short screws with the face place in order to make sure it says tight. That worked for a bit now I'm finding that sometimes the screws are actually getting broken off in the face plate which is not a good thing. meaning the heads snapped off. Probably due to operator error. how ever that was solved. I think I am using too small of screw length wise, the piece doesn't get enough grip I guess and it comes loose from the face plate. What would be the suggestion here to solve this problem. Being safety cautious as I am I don't let it make me jump but I don't want to break a hand or worse hurt someone else with a flying projectile. Suggestions would be helpful. Thanks.
  12. AndrewB

    Well Now

    I’m fairly pleased with this turn out. I did not use the dovetail jaws on this one just the face plate. I guess you could say it’s okay for a beginner candle stick holder we shall see. I’ve still got to put a coat of wax on it I just finished with the boiled linseed oil how ever I think the wax will just add more too it. I used nothing but carbide tipped tools. I was going for the more rugged beat up kind of look and got it. So once I get this thing cut off from the base I guess I could call it a successful turn.
  13. Hope this Wednesday finds everyone healthy and still sane. Our Patriot Turners- @Ron Altier is holding up well under the lockdown. He finished up a sweet little ornament that has a whole bunch of glue-ups! Here's his post- @Gerald had a new comment one of his beautiful bowls in our gallery. Check out his post and read about the tree species- What’s Coming Up- It has been tough coming up with shows and symposiums. Last thing I read was that the Mid-Atlantic Woodturners are unsure if they will be able to have their symposium in the fall. For The Newbies- If you turn with traditional tools, sharpening skills are necessary to keep the tools cutting at their best. Sometime the sharpening process can change the tool cutting tip profile. Here is a video, posted by Woodturners Wonders, showing how to correct the profile on a bowl gouge. From their Facebook feed, Jet Tools has a series of short videos tips for their tools. If the hand wheel, on the tailstock, is getting stiff- here's a cleaning tip- There's an entire series of these tips at- https://www.youtube.com/user/JETTOOLSUSA/videos Need a mallet to set the drive spur? Check this out! https://www.woodworkersjournal.com/turn-a-better-mallet/ Expand Your Horizons- You know I'm a jig junky. This is an idea that can really create some interesting effects- Part 2 is linked from the video. Mike Peace shows us how to make a footed bowl- New Turning Items- Recently, I was reading a discussion about which scroll chuck to purchase. The author was lamenting about the hassle of changing jaws. Several of the responders indicated how many different chucks they owned. It seemed to me, if they were to have purchased the Easy Wood Tools ( @Jim from Easy Wood Tools ) chuck, they could save the hassle of changing jaws and a ton of money to boot! This video, from Tracey Malady, shows the versatility of the EWT awesome Easy Chuck. Everything Else- This past weeks videos from Rick Turns- Last week @Gerald asked to see that antagonistic spalted maple bowl. I used a beeswax/mineral oil finish. There were so many soft/punky places embedded within the harder wood that it was impossible to a completely smooth surface. There is also that hole left from where the ingrown branch went diagonally through the piece. As a glutton for punishment, I pulled out an elm, roughed out blank from a bag of shavings. Maybe I'll have better luck this time- Safe turning and stay well
  14. A beautiful November day here in Pennsylvania. Too bad I'm substituting and can't enjoy it. Our Patriot Turners- @Gerald is working on Christmas presents! He is turning some gorgeous pendants. Checkout Gerald's post and look at the neat chuck he is using- @Pauley is looking for some help finding snowflake patterns or sources. Please head on over to his post and see if you can provide any help- What’s Coming Up- Click on the above image for more information and registration. For The Newbies- Looking for an easy project that will make a really nice gift? Maybe this will give you some ideas- Expand Your Horizons- M. Saban-Smith has an interesting video showing how to embellish your turnings. He demonstrates what the Sorby texturing tool can do. New Turning Items- The folks at Woodturners Wonders have a couple of new sanding disk backer pads Check out these products at- https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/sanding-pad-holders Everything Else- In @Gerald's post on the offset pendants, he mentioned about making beads as part of the project. Mike Peace has a video on how he does them- Gerald's project of offset turning really has lots of related information this week. Mr. David Reed Smith published an article using offset turning to add Celtic like rings to a turning- The complete article is at- http://davidreedsmith.com/Articles/InlaidRings/InlaidRings.html. Mr. Smith's tutorials are extremely well documented and easy to follow. He also references several other articles on useful jigs. In case you missed it, we added another tip to the Woodturning Tips Forum. You can see it at- @John Morris has made available just about all of the old Woodturning Forum posts. Some great memories from the archives. https://thepatriotwoodworker.com/forums/forum/5-wood-turning-archives/ The Woodturning OnLine newsletter is available at- https://www.woodturningonline.com/index.php?edition=112019. As you are looking through the newsletter, take advantage of the great selection of resources for projects, videos, and tutorials. As I pointed out at the beginning of this week's post, I'm substituting today, Thursday and Friday. Yesterday I received a phone call from the local Jet supplier- So there it sets, in the back of my truck- it's just not fair!! Have to wait until Saturday to begin unpacking and muscling parts to the basement. Safe turning
  15. Just got a email from Woodcraft with a article on hand planes . Has some good info in it for those who know and especially those who do not . MASTERING THE HAND PLANE
  16. I ran across this collection of tips, tricks, jigs, etc from Mike Peace. He explains this is a rehash of some earlier tips that he thinks he didn't do a good a job of presenting them as he could. The video is about 31 minutes long. The video was listed on the September Woodturning Online Newsletter.
  17. I have the first edition and Jim Tolpin has written an updated version. I did not read the whole book, just looked at the pictures . Well I did read some because I have made several jigs from the books and still use them today. The jigs and other tips are very well illustrated and information is easy to understand to build the jigs. I would recommend this for anyone from newbie to experienced woodworker. He covers everything from tuneup , blades, jigs, crosscuts ripping , accessories, and grooves and dados and much more. You can get it as low as 1.99 at Barnes and Noble or 4.99 at Thrift Books. I have on my saw the magic fence pictured below. it can be added to for tenon jig that can do more than tenon.
  18. Like Ernie, my tool well became a junk catcher and I filled it in recently. A "Mil" is 0.001" the 4 mil is called the wet mil, and the resulting 1 mil is called the dry mil. Note this is sponsored by Waterlox. I took a class from Ernie 15 or so years ago. His shop is in a barn right across the road from the Boy Scout camp I went to years ago. Now a county park. Amish buggies still trot by on the road. https://www.waterlox.com/project-help/video?id=469e6831b68d431db75d2d4d355a93d1
  19. This LINK takes you to a method to make holders for sanding discs for your drill. I will add to this you will need to add a pad to the holder and velcro . For gluing the pad ( garden knee foam works) on Shoe Goo works very well. For the velcro use either plain back and glue on or self adhesive. Also I shape mine with the wood being smaller than the sanding pad and then shape the foam on the lathe with a skew , kinda like a little funnel shape.
  20. This page has several tips and there are more pages to this tips section. Of note on the first page are the depth gauge, wire burner (always use handles for these) , and sawbucks. Some of the later pages are common sense and some like using wood chisels on a lathe I do not condone. So have a look and see what you can use and we can discuss usefulness . Wood Turning Tips - 1
  21. We had a great club meeting today and got some great tips from Mark Sillay. 1. Turning bowls end grain instead of side grain gives a whole different pwerspective. 2. When turning hollow form (end grain ) put CA around the inside of the neck opening and on the bottom of tenon. Spray accelerator inside to create barrier on bottom so the CA does not go thru and bowl will not crack. 3.When remounting a piece and is not running true . Leave the chuck slight loose and with lathe running slow place a gouge with flutes down over tool rest and lever the workpiece very gently till is true and then tighten chuck. 4.Use a Spindle Roughing Gouge with a steeper than 45 angle grind to act like a skew to smooth the outside of a bowl. This will be angled like a skew and rubbing the bevel. There was more but do not know how i could explain.
  22. So how do y'all attach a backing to a fretwork piece? Specifically, how do you apply the adhesive so that it dosen't get on the finished sides? Additionally I would like to use a waterproof glue (Welcome sign for the front door), polyurethane comes to mind but it seems to be pretty messy and ugly if too much is applied. Thoughts?
  23. As mentioned before, the tips and tricks we mention here are personal choices and not gospel. We all have our particular ways of doing things that work for us. There are NO absolutes in scrolling. Sorry to have taken so long in getting the next Tips and Tricks our, folks. Life got in the way. Anyway, there has been some interest in how to make self-framing projects. This type of project is the art of using one piece of wood for both the picture AND the frame. For the demo, I have chosen a Sheila Landry design for the project. Without going into all the basics of choosing the wood, sanding, prep work, affixing the pattern, assume we have already done it. (Because this is a purchased pattern, I will not include all of the pattern here.) What I want you to notice is the "X" marked on the pattern and marked "Drill Entry Hole Here" Why there, you ask???? That is the point that we will start making our frame. The figure in the middle is going to be recessed by 1/4 to 3/8" around this line. Outside of this line will be the frame. When we make self-framing projects, we don't want any light to shine through our framing cut AND we want to make sure that we have a good glue area. To accomplish this task, we will need to use a "bevel" technique. That simply means that we change the angle of the blade to the wood. With most of the saws, you will tilt the table to change the angle of the cut. With the Excalibur saw, you will change the angle of the cutting head. Depending on the size of the blade you use, you will change the angle from 2 to 5 degrees. I know that we are talking about very small changes - - - - soooooooooooooooooooooo - - - - - the image below is that of a protractor. Feel free to copy this image or download your own by searching "protractor image" in your favorite search engine. When printing this image you change its size to suit. After printing, I glued mine onto scrap, and cut the outside. Be certain that the bottom of the image is flush with the bottom of your scrap. The next step that I personally recommend is to use a piece of scrap and cut some test areas as shown below. I label each area with the amount of angle on the blade. Also notice that I labeled the size of the blade. (OK, I mislabeled the #3 blade as #4). This seems to help me choose the amount of angle and size of blade by actually showing me how far the cut piece will move. The next step will be to drill the entry hole. Choose the smallest drill bit that you can for this entry hole as it will probably be seen (more on this later). Now - there are some differences of opinion in this step. some say that you can drill the hole at 90 degrees - in other words straight down - other say that you must drill the hold on your chosen angle. Try it both ways and see which way works best for you. Ready for the next step? Notice that nothing has been said yet about any cutting on the pattern itself. We will do that in a little while. OK - tilt your saw to the chosen angle of cut. At this point, it doesn't really make any difference which direction (if you saw will tilt both ways). Thread the blade through the hole and tighten the tension. I have a habit of a little over-tightening at this point because I don't want the blade to wander. NOW to decide which direction to cut. You are going to want the outside (frame) to fall out the bottom of the piece. This will eventually make the center piece depressed into the frame and the frame proud. When you are satisfied you are cutting in the right direction, do so. Slow and steady will make a great even cut. When you are finished, test fit the center by inserting it into the frame from the top. It should be something like the picture below. If all looks good, go ahead and glue the pieces together. Allow at least 8 hours to dry. After you are sure the pieces are cured, it's time for the next step. Using a carrier board, it is time to plane the back side. This step is not mandatory but I like to use it - makes for a more finished piece on the back side. (Shown in the picture below) Another thing that I will do at this time, because I have some nice firm wood to work with, is to route a 1/4" round-over around the inside of the frame. You can almost see that in the picture below OK - now it's time to cut out everything starting with the inside and working out to the frame. Below is what I ended up with. Notice that I also put a 1/4" round-over around the entire frame. Whatcha think, folks - ready to try "Self-Framing" projects..? ? ? ? ? ? Let's have some discussion here. Give it a try and post your results. And thanks for your participation.
  24. Again, Before we get started on this week's stuff, I'd like to remind you of the request from @Jim from Easy Wood Tools. The generous folks at Easy Wood Tools are decorating their lobby for Christmas and would like to use turned ornaments for the tree. The ornaments don't have to be finished. Plain wooden ones will be painted by volunteers at Easy Wood Tools. The ornaments can be simple turnings from non-descript wood. However, if you wish to make some fancy ones- think of the type made by @Ron Altier, @Gerald and @Steve Krumanaker- those would be displayed just as you made them-- No Paint!! If you need ideas, I have a list of websites, tutorials and ideas. Just let me know!!! Well Pennsylvania has set another record- We have had only 4 days without measurable rain since July 1. Gimme a break!!! Our Patriot Turners- Speaking of ornaments- @Ron Altier turned a beautiful blue and white colored plywood piece, although not without some problems- Ron describes what happened in his post and he received lots of feedback, too. @HandyDan is getting into the Christmas spirit with his gorgeous turned angel ornaments. He received lots of compliments and answered some questions, here- And, @Steve Krumanaker was super busy with his batch of awesome ornaments. And this is just a sampling of what Steve has done! Steve also explained his process for the finish on these, in his post- We've had a couple of questions this week from some of our members. @hawkeye10 is considering getting into turning. He asked our members what they would recommend. He received lots of comments. He is also eyeing a new-to-him lathe, from Craigslist and asked our members their thoughts on it. Head on over to his posts and help him out! @Bob Hodge posted a question in the finishing forum about turning and sandpaper grits. I am reposting it here in hopes our turners can chime in and give him some advice/help- What’s Coming Up- The Virginia Woodturning Symposium is in November- Click on the above image for additional information. Stuart Kent will be at the American Association of Woodturners in Raleigh, NC, November 2019. Click on the above image to go to Stuart's Facebook page for additional information. From The Internet- @Gerald Added a great video of an interview with Barry Todd and our good friend form Woodcraft, Frank Byers. If you watch the video, check out how Mr. Todd burnished a finial! I've been adding some short videos into the Woodturner's Tips section. So far , they have been from Mike Peace. If you see videos that offer tips on turning, please add them to the "Tips" section- don't forget to add tags to your entry! Everything Else- With all the rain, I've had a little time to play at the lathe making ornaments for @Jim from Easy Wood Tools. One of the shapes I could never master is a sphere. I know the mechanics and the math but what comes off of the lathe could never be considered round! I did't want to spend the $$ purchasing a jig that would only be used occasionally. One turner/"inventor" I really enjoy following is Mr. David Reed Smith. Checking his site, I found a technique for turning spheres using a shop made jig. The jig uses a shadow to check the turning progress. It consists of an adjustable platform sliding in a dovetail on a fixed base. The platform is secured with a screw that pulls the dovetail tight. I used a fender washer to prevent the screw from gouging the base. The fixed base is held on the lathe ways with magnets. The platform holds the "pattern". And the shadow is created by an Ikea LED lamp suspended over the turning. An alignment post is used to help position the lamp at the correct location. The blank is turned while watching the shadow on the pattern. The setup looks like- Harbor Freight has a small LED flashlight on sale. I'm trying to figure out how to use their magnetic base/arm to replace the Ikea suspended lamp. I think I'll need to get some metric tap and die stuff. If you are interested in Mr. Smith's jig, here is the web page with the instructions on making it- http://davidreedsmith.com/Articles/ShadowSphereJig/ShadowSphereJig.htm Safe turning
×
×
  • Create New...