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Smallpatch

No body likes hand sanding and putting more paper

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I just fold it over grit side out and cut it with a thin knife like using a letter opener.  Works well for me.  Going to have to give that paper a try.  I really like the 3M sand paper.  It's all I use.

Edited by HandyDan

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Thanks for the tip on the "new" 3M paper Patch. I'll take a look (if I can remember) the next time I'm at the Big Box.

Been cutting sandpaper like you for over 50 years except I've got an old 12" steel rule I hold down on the fold crease.

I've got a couple of those sanding block too. Had to toss my original which looked just like yours in the pic after 50+ years...rubber finally deteriorated...did a lot of body work with it too.

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Dave besides Sherwin Williams only Lowes had the paper and it wasn't in the tool section for all they had there was an off the wall brand but it was in the paint section. I would think lumber yards should stock it. Home depot caries 3M sandpaper but not this and I told the guy someone was stupid for not having it... The bad thing, it says 4 sheets but not full sheets as you will see when you find it...I only use the p220 for thats what I use between coats of lacquer...I don't use anything but lacquer so I can't comment about other paints with this type of sand paper.

  Since I like to spray outside I have to watch the temp and the humidity. The  temp does slow down the drying but the high humidity is bad on lacquer. High humidity will turn lacquer in to a white cloudy mess unless a retarder is added to slow down the drying time but now I mostly do the rattle can thingy and let my paint guns hang on the wall so I have to watch the weather more than I use to.

  I learned a long time ago not to clean the area with a damp cloth when fixing to spray lacquer for a very small pocket of moisture will cause air bubbles in the finish. I use a wide very soft paint brush and air pressure to clean the area and I been spraying lacquer since 1954 and have never trapped any steel wool in any of my finishes....Before, when I would see the air bubbles forming I would right quick put an eye dropper full of Smoothy in the paint gun and re coat that area with more lacquer and that would eliminate the air bubbles... Then finally I learned not to use the damp rags to remove the dust. This was back when trial and error was the only way to learn anything.

Edited by Smallpatch

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37 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

Dave besides Sherwin Williams only Lowes had the paper and it wasn't in the tool section for all they had there was an off the wall brand but it was in the paint section.

We don't have a SW store local anymore, but the big city North does. I'll check at Menard's (which you don't have down there) first. Same thing with them, all their sanding supplies are in the paint & finish section except for sanding belts which is in the tool section. Go figure. Big city also has Lowe's but I don't go there very often mainly do to the store location from an inconvenience point.

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I have to wonder if this is similar to a sandpaper 3M used to sell. It was kind of a purple color and was very flexible like what you have described. It also lasted a very long time. I've looked for it but can no longer find it. If I remember correctly it was about twice the price of their regular sandpaper, but worth the cost to me for how long it lasted.

I used to get it at Menard's.

You can call me crazy, but I like hand sanding, I find it to be relaxing.

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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23 minutes ago, Larry Buskirk said:

You can call me crazy,

I would have to be certified to do so which technically would then make me certifiable crazy:WonderScratch:

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5 minutes ago, Grandpadave52 said:

I would have to be certified to do so which technically would then make me certifiable crazy:WonderScratch:

Does that mean you like hand sanding also?

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2 minutes ago, Larry Buskirk said:

Does that mean you like hand sanding also?

I've found that task is good entry level training for the grand-kids...they seem to not enjoy it nearly as much as me....must be hereditary

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I remember what my dad used to say about our generation,

I can only imagine what he would have to say about the ones that followed us.

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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I picked this up at a Rockler store a few years ago to cut my sandpaper.  Works good, and doesn't cost much.  I got tired of creasing and re-creasing my sandpaper, and then cursing when the rip went off the crease line.  

 

https://www.rockler.com/rockler-sandpaper-cutter

 

 

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@Smallpatch...while I was at Menard's today, went to the paint section and they do carry this sandpaper. Funny you show the 220g but they didn't have any of that...just 180g & 320g...picked up a pack of each to try especially since it can be used wet or dry. I think it was $4.99/pk of 8 sheets, which really is only two before you quarter it. Guess it's priced higher like 1/4 sawn lumber.

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Dave the 220 is the only size I buy so maybe more guys think like I do. I only get 2 sheets  which they call four sheets for 4 dollars and some cents.

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They (Menard's) may carry the 220g; there was an empty space on the shelf, but only a UPC number. Since this can be used wet or dry, I thought I'd try it on some of my tool refurbs. The extra strength back yet having good flexibility should work well.

 

Ironically, they didn't have any 180g or 320g wet or dry, but had 220g...didn't need any, it was just an observation. They did have some 600g & 800g wet or dry so I picked up some of those. Nothing finer than that though.

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