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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
John Morris

Equisite Rot and Spalted Wood

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Thanks, John. Painting with wood is an exacting art. 

I suppose it's due to regional differences, Italian vs French, vs N. American but, what the author of that excellent article terms Intarsia, the French would call marqueterie. I've always thought of Intarsia as an onlay process. No matter who calls it what, that article illustrates some wonderful work. 

If it's of interest, researching the French methods of marqeterie, especially, their tool, the chevalet de marqueterie might be worthwhile. It would certainly be another visual feast.

 

Edited by Gene Howe

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41 minutes ago, Gene Howe said:

If it's of interest, researching the French methods of marqeterie, especially, their tool, the chevalet de marqueterie might be worthwhile. It would certainly be another visual feast.

Yes! It's of great interest, thanks for the reference material!

 

Great points on the terminology Gene, based on your observation, I did do some research and found that sawn veneers were not available until the 17th century, yet the images in the article are works from the 1400's and 1500's. So those pieces are truly Intarsia, as we know it today! Amazing!

 

For another article that mentions the veneer availability you can see here: http://marquetrytime.blogspot.com/2012/12/intarsia.html

The writer seems very knowledgeable about the craft, I am assuming he or she is correct in the time frame.

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Another neat article/blog that really helps clears up the terminology and history of the craft. Thanks, John. 

A good friend, Paul Miller, does some fine work in French marqeterie in his shops in AZ and, near Victoria BC. He teaches classes in his shop in Canada. Here's a couple of his sites you might find interesting.

http://www.prmdesigns.com 

And, http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/abouttheinstructor.html

 

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29 minutes ago, Gene Howe said:

Another neat article/blog that really helps clears up the terminology and history of the craft. Thanks, John. 

A good friend, Paul Miller, does some fine work in French marqeterie in his shops in AZ and, near Victoria BC. He teaches classes in his shop in Canada. Here's a couple of his sites you might find interesting.

http://www.prmdesigns.com 

And, http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/abouttheinstructor.html

 

Thanks Gene, just this morning and I am learning, I never knew what a chevalet was till today. What a neat art!

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Paul's first Chevalet was built with some boise de arc I had kicking around the shop. I think it's still in his AZ shop. After he finished it, he gave me some hands on tutelage in it's use. Took me a couple hours to cut out a howling coyote, a sugaro, moon and a mountain. The same cuts took him, maybe, 30 minutes. He's a master. 

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On 7/20/2018 at 7:54 AM, Gene Howe said:

The same cuts took him, maybe, 30 minutes. He's a master.

I love watching a master, work through the process's like silk,

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WOW WOW WOW WOW

Fantastic projects - I've got a LONG way to go before I would even attempt it

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7 minutes ago, Fred Wilson said:

WOW WOW WOW WOW

Fantastic projects - I've got a LONG way to go before I would even attempt it

Step 1: build a chevalet.:lol: 

Seriously, for packet sawing, it's a lot easier than with a scroll saw. But, I shouldn't talk. I'm no good with either.

Edited by Gene Howe

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