Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
  • entries
    4
  • comments
    13
  • views
    1,576

Mistakes, Mistakes, Mistakes!

lew

894 views

Once the legs were completed, I started on the aprons and stretchers. The stretchers are to be mortised and tenoned into the legs. The long stretcher needed to be securely fastened into the side stretcher but their thickness was only 3/4 ". That meant a very short tenon (1/2") on the ends of the long stretcher. I decided, mistakenly, to use a fox tenon and a dovetail style mortise, with tapered sides and wider at the bottom.

 

IMG_6104.JPG

 

It took a little work to get the mortises chopped. I even had to make a small measuring tool to determine the width of the bottom. My inside calipers were just a little too big.

 

IMG_6111.JPG

 

 

Next, I calculated the wedge size and then modified the tenons to accommodate the wedges.

IMG_6113.JPG

 

My mistake here was failing to take into consideration the amount of spreading vs. the hardness of the wood. Fortunately, I had the foresight to try a test piece and discovered as the tenons halves spread, they cracked at the shoulder. Insert a long string of Navy language here.

 

Back to the drawing board. Early on in the project I had considered using a sliding dovetail for this connection. Hindsight being what it is, that's what I ended up using.

IMG_6116.JPG

 

The other failure, at this stage was when I ripped the materials for some of the aprons. The wood was plenty dry but internal stresses caused the some warping and twisting of several pieces. Allowing the pieces to set for a couple of days only made matters worse.

 

I ended up ripping more pieces and then creating the tenons.

IMG_6091.JPG

 

Used a stop block/miter gauge to create to shoulder cuts

IMG_6087.JPG

 

IMG_6093.JPG

 

 

Then the old Delta tenoning jig for the cheek cuts

IMG_6095.JPG

 

 

And finally nibbled away the remaining material to complete the apron and stretcher pieces.

IMG_6097.JPG

 

 

I cut all of the tenons a little over sized so I could trim them to get a really snug fit during assembly. The minister said this table would serve multiple duties. I wanted to be sure nothing would work loose over time.

 

All that's left for the base, I hope, is a final dry fit and then a glue up.



5 Comments


Recommended Comments

Just now, Fred Wilson said:

Lew, it's not a mistake unless it is made in the final product.  Anything else is just dry fitting errors.

Awaiting the final project pictures.

Thanks, Fred! I, too, am waiting to see the table with the finish applied. I was hoping they would send a photo.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Who We Are

Operation Ward 57 Challenge Coin Display Project

We are a woodworking community with an emphasis on sharing and learning the skilled craft of woodworking and all of its related disciplines. Our community is open to everyone who wishes to join us. We support our American veterans and active duty, being a veteran is not a prerequisite to join. Join us now!

Objective

Air Force Command Center Plaque

Of course just like most online woodworking communities we are centralized in the arts, crafts, and trades that are woodworking. But, we have another focus in our Patriot Woodworker community, we are the only woodworking community that was founded on our care and concern for our disabled veterans.

Volunteer

Patriot Woodworker Volunteers

The Patriot Woodworkers are an all volunteer community, from the staff and hosts who run our online woodworking community to the members who frequent our forums, you'll find volunteers in all of us. We are not on a payroll, unless you consider the spiritual rewards gained from volunteering, as compensation.

Education

Logging

One of the many projects we are working on is a wiki for our online community. A wiki is a great way for woodworkers and enthusiasts to share their knowledge to others, and to impart their knowledge for others to learn from, and utilize as well for their own benefit. We hope you'll consider being a wiki contributor.

×
×
  • Create New...