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Found 6 results

  1. Yesterday I managed to extract myself from the busy life of Honey Do's and kids daily events and get a little time in the shop with our Claro Rocker. A week ago when I started laying out the arms ontop of the arm pads that are basically the top of the front legs, I realized I made a major mistake in my calculations for the arm rests to meet up at the proper height to the joint at the rear leg/backrest area. I was a full 1/4" too low, the joinery was not going to meet up where it was supposed to by my previously laid out joints. After much thinking and tinkering with ideas and layouts, I finally came to the conclusion that I'll simply increase the height of the arm rest by adding a 1/4" block to raise up the arm rest. Since this is walnut, the newly added pad will be un-noticeable. In some regards these rockers are un-forgiving in errors, but in many regards these rockers are also very forgiving in the sense that this is in essence a sculpted work, so errors and mis-steps often times can be carved, shaped, and filed away or to blend, and in this case, it is a forgiving error/ Images below are not exciting, they simply show my modified pad glued up to the top of the front leg pad to increase the height of the arm rest. First image shows my pad glued up and secured with my quick grips just to get them in place. One thing I like to do is save sawn cut-outs from a piece I shape so we can use them as clamping cauls, you'll notice the blocks at the bottom of the shaped arm pad, they were initially cut out for the the preliminary shaping of the arm rest block, I held on to them to use as I clamp up the arm rest to the block, but I was also able to use them in this fix for clamping cauls. Next images show the clamps all in place on both arm rests pads. Unrelated to the arm rest FUBAR, are more images showing the preliminary shaping of the front leg seat joints. I rough and blend the joints in with a 4.5" right angle grinder. But first I need to secure the chair to my bench. Next I take to grinding the general shape of the joint. As it takes shape I'll then finish it up with a combination of my ROS and some files. Image below shows the joint blended and formed, no gaps in the glue joint either, this is a successful chair joint. To reach the other side of the joint, I need to position the chair on the floor, and brace it with my legs and feet, and work on the joint from a comfortable height as I sit. The joint is not finished, but it's coming along. I use the same technique as I did with the other side of the joint in images above. Thanks for following along, now contrary to popular propositions and laws being formed and voted on, I feel these are some "joints" we can all get behind!
  2. I'm sure glad I can learn a lot about woodworking on the internet. Here's a couple of the first few hits on "types of wood joints" I am going to practice making dovetials [sic] like this and get a good, strong joint. Seems kind of wasteful of wood, though. I will have to wait until I have some turkey legs before I can get a tendon for a mortise and tendon [sic] joint, too. They obviously stole the above from Bob Vila (or vice-versa) I think I will also make some of these very strong dovetail joints. (found at another site 8 joints you need to know) And I am going to look for some of those marvelous square profile biscuits, but I may need to change the cutter on my biscuit joiner machine. Trying to figure out the difference between a miter joint and a mitered butt joint, too. And your standard dowel joint, described as, "You’ll find dowel joints on woodworking items where visible screws or nails are not desirable, such as high-end cabinetry, bookcases, and custom stairways." This is a very attractive and strong joint that I'd expect to see on high-end cabinetry. All can say is, "Geez, glad I have 40 years experience."
  3. What would be an easy 90 degree joint besides just screwing/nailing the two together at the ends (one overlapping the other)? Butt joints? I don't have a draw saw (whatever that japanese saw is called). I do have a jig saw and a hack saw.
  4. John Morris

    Steam Box Joints

    From the album: Shaker Furniture

    After about an hour of steaming the chair posts, the joints in the box starting acting up as I expected. They expanded and warped, but surprisingly maintained a seal. The box held up wonderfully.
  5. It's done, and delivered to the owner lastnight. It turned out really nice, the chair is nice and tight now, and I steel wooled it clean of dirt and smooted out imperfections, then I applied a very liberal coat of BLO and let dry for 15 minutes and rubbed off The next evening I rubbed it out with Liberon Black Bison Wax, this really is the final finish when it comes to any work I do. Finished work does not leave my shop without a coat of wax, the wax gives an overall warmth and eveness to the project, not too mention the Bison Wax just smells reall nice too, I love it. See the beautiful sheen and gloss on the arms and rest of the chair, that is a direct result of the waxing. You'll notice in the images in Danish Modern Part 1 you'll see some paint scratches in the wood, I braved the procedure that Mark Wisecarver had suggested but I shot down, scraping the paint off with a card scraper. It actually worked very well, just a couple light passes with the card scraper the embedded paint came right off.
  6. I got the arms on the chair, with the help of a couple clamping jigs and some simple techniques that I never would have thought of, the arm face to the back leg face is a perfect match. I didn't get very good shots of the process, so any explanation would be futile, sorry, the clamping jigs are all on the other side, don't know why I took a pic of the glued up arm instead of the one that was being fit to be glued, duh! The above pic shows how the paper is moved back n forth, I sand one side, then flip the paper over to sand the other face, bringing both faces of the joint into perfect compliance. While sanding, I am bending the paper away from the grit, so the paper doesn't put a curved edge of the joint, destroying the joint immediately. The final fit, perfect, ready for glue up and later, shaping.
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