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Found 9 results

  1. Just when I thought I saw the light at the end of the tunnel, I realized it was a long freight train heading in my direction... Our Patriot Turners- @Gerald Showed us a hollow form to which he added color. He received lots of questions and compliments about this piece. Please check out his post and see how he did this- @HandyDan shared a really neat design he found. If you have ever struggled with moving you lathe (or any heavy piece of shop equipment) this might just be the ticket. Check Dan's post for additional concepts- Last week's post, from @FlGatorwood, concerning the skew heel vs. toe discussion generated lots more comments. If you missed the post or want to see what others had to say- @Ron Altier gave us a heads up on a really cool video. Lots of turning being shown, as well as other types of woodworking. What’s Coming Up- The Rocky Mountain Woodturning Symposium is coming up! September 13th- 15th. Click on the above image for the link to more information and registration. For The Newbies- @Gerald provided us with a link to a nice sanding disc holder. Check out Gerald's post for the link and some of the comments- If you are thinking about buying a lathe, Mike Peace posted a video that may help you. Expand Your Horizons- Off center turning can create some really interesting shapes. Sam Angelo demonstrates turning a teardrop shape. New Turning Items- If you have a "Work Sharp" machine and wanted to be able to use CBN sharpening wheels, you are in luck!! The folks over a Woodturners Wonders now have just what you've been looking for!!! Two sided discs in various grits. Check them out at- https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/cbn-discs-for-work-sharp Everything Else- Rick Morris (Rick Turns) recently moved into a new shop. In this video, he shows us that even a new shop can't prevent Edward Murphy's Law from being applied- Safe turning
  2. This LINK takes you to a method to make holders for sanding discs for your drill. I will add to this you will need to add a pad to the holder and velcro . For gluing the pad ( garden knee foam works) on Shoe Goo works very well. For the velcro use either plain back and glue on or self adhesive. Also I shape mine with the wood being smaller than the sanding pad and then shape the foam on the lathe with a skew , kinda like a little funnel shape.
  3. Bailing wire was once was considered the best known method responsible for the making the American west. Today that has changed by the advent of Duct tape, Super glue, Velcro, as wood crafters Hi tech screws & biscuts. But below I have a helper to act as a second pair of hands for the guy that works by himself in a wood shop, that makes boxes into anything. These supports are similar to those my Grandfather had. The dimensions for each bracket are 3" wide 7" long and 7" tall and made from 1/2 Baltic Birch ply wood as my preferred material for shop jigs & fixtures, for the most part. A base accepts two supports, and is the same width and twice the length (1/2" x3" x 14"). You can go longer but for storage sake I saw no reason because you have so much adjustment. You can leave a tail if you want to clamp the fixture to you work table. My work tables are replaceable so I screw a lot of my fixtures directly to the table. When I get real anal retentive I use a spoil board to attach the fixtures. The base has 4 holes in it. Two of which hold in my case 1/4" " Tee nuts which the first bore in sequence is a counter bore so the t nut will be more than flush with the bottom. In this scenario the counter bore is 3/4' diameter and 3/32" deep centered 2" in from the end. A second pair of "T" nuts can be added down the line but I never found that necessary. The "T" nut holes center treadled shaft required a 5/16" bore to be bored in the center of the "t" nut counter bore. I used a fence and a stop for the counter bore in the same setting for both. I then placed the stop in 1" with the 5/16 bit to bore holes on each end to hang the finished fixtures for storage. Because I am the way that I am a slight counter sink bit cleaned the holes with a slight chamfer. The photo below shows the bases top & bottom. On the supports box joints were used in the 90 degree corner and a 1/4" dado runs parallel the length 1/4" deep and 1/2" in from the edges to accept 1/4" birch plywood corner bracing to maintain a 90 degree angle. A single 1/4 slot is created centered and about 1†from each end it is stopped. This is done on half the support arms to facilitate the adjustment knob & bolt for adjusting the supports in & out. It is a easy task on a router table with stop blocks. A ¼ hole was bored in the path prior as a starter hole. Once the material is finish milled a dry fit is to routing is made. Make double sure in the dry fit process all your joinery is consistent and accurate. The assembly would be matching the two support pieces aligning the dados. Glue is put in the corner joint and the dado. Place the 1/4 ply angle supports in the bottom dados inset about 1/8 from the edge where the corner comes together. Now draw the two support pieces to form the 90 degree angle with the upright of the corner to enter in its dado mate. Remember I said the lower one is only about 1/8 of an inch from the end of the support? That wont allow the support arm pieces to seat into their corner purposely. This is so when you clamp the corner into fit the plywood is firmly and completely seated in that dado. Working in your glue up time, make sure all is aligned and you have solid seated joints. Check the 90 degree angle with a square and make adjustments as needed. This is not the time find your milling is sloppy so make double sure in the dry fit process all your joinery is consistent and accurate. Once I find the support arm is square and all is in place I toe nail a pin front & back, top & bottom of both the angle bracket where it meets the dado penetrating the bracket and the support arm. After assembling the support arms turn your attention to installing the two nuts into the counter bored holes. This production used ¼ x 2 carriage bolts, washers & ¼ threaded mini knobs. The bolts are threaded through the top of the mini knob completely, and a washer is placed over the other end of the bolt and the bolt is inserted through the slot and threaded deep enough to sufficiently garb but not protrude beyond the base bottom side. Now you can use your preference of corner clamps to handle the task at hand. My final thing would storage of these awkward devices. Remember the other holes that I chamfered with a countersink bit, on the ends of the base? They hang like ducks in a row. By Brad Vickery copyright.
  4. The story behind this little "What is it", is that I had this 1/2 log piece that came with the lumber stash,pic1. I didn't know what kind of wood it was so I cut a about 6" off the end to clean up and see what I had. It turned out to be Maple. I didn't want to just throw away the piece so thought I would make a band saw box out of it. So I cut the bottom off, cut out the center, glued up the sides and reattached the bottom. The cut on the bottom looked ugly so I made a molding and then made some feet for it and called it a desktop pencil holder. The finish is 2 coats of spray shellac, and 6 coats of water based poly thinned 50/50 with water. I did stained the base/feet ,because it looked better next to the bark. Herb
  5. Picked this "gem" today while on a rust hunt....yes I found rust, too... That is the blade that was with it. There is a thumbscrew to tighten things in place... It has a smooth, curve "bottom" Those "teeth" on the blade are not from a breakage.. They have been filed that way. The only markings seems to ba a "Patented DEC (#) 15......as in Dec of 1915. The "day" part is a bit scratched up. One other edge is straight (almost) and the other has a slight curve to it. Thumbscrew seems to match a Stanley made one. What is it?
  6. lew

    Battery Holder

    I lost a lot of my hearing during my stint in the Navy, working around jet aircraft. Now I wear hearing aids. The batteries tend to die when you need them most. I turned this little holder for my key chain. Made from Walnut and Maple.
  7.     See the tilt differences? IT's supposed to keep the littler tools from spinning out     What lathe tool carousel picture would be without a Where's Waldo picture with the wood carousel lost in wood clutter? If you can find it in the first thirty seconds of looking you win a prize. It's an a ll expenses paid dream vacation to the mists of Avalon long ago and far away. You even get to have dinner they Mordred and Morganna  
  8. From the album: Ring Tray's

    A bit wider view of the piece. I still have a lot of sanding to do but here it is
  9. Charles Nicholls

    Ring Tray 1

    From the album: Ring Tray's

    This ring tray is made from Birdseye maple and curly maple. I tried to get a tighter shot of the grain, I hope it worked.
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