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Found 12 results

  1. I have been busy designing and building a side chair to go with our new kitchen table. The plan was to build one prototype out of poplar, and a 2nd chair out of poplar. Both of these chairs will be either painted black or sprayed with black lacquer. Then, the plan is to build four chairs from cherry and maple. The prototype chair was completed this week. The 2nd poplar chair is moving along and the material for the cherry chairs has been purchased, acclimated to my shop environment, cut, jointed, and planned to rough dimensions. The seat blanks for the cherry chairs have a few additional steps complete. My wife wanted (6) new chairs (side chairs) for our kitchen. Designing/making chairs is a challenging task. The design needs to look pleasing to the eye, structural, and functional. There are a few chair “builds” on the internet, but they did not meet my needs. Many of the side chair designs today either have a cushion seat or have Maloof joinery. When a chair has a cushion, the seat does not have a cant, allowing the design/construction to be simplified (eliminates six compound joints). A chair with the Maloof joinery does incorporate a wooden seat, but I did not want to mimic someone else’s design. This chair design will attempt to pull design features from the kitchen cabinets, kitchen table, and from the bar stools. My wife would like the chairs to have a short back (36”), a wooden seat, and have a short seat depth, so that she will be able to sit in it comfortably. The chair construction will utilize mortise & tenon joinery, mortise & loose tenon joinery, and dowel joinery. While searching for information, I found a book written by Jeff Miller, (from Chicago). Jeff is a known chair craftsman/designer/builder. His book gives much insight into the “what, why, and how” different things are done and the jigs he uses for the needed joints. This book is a good read. I also reviewed Mike Dunbar’s (from New Hampshire) work. He is known for his Windsor chair. I did not what to mimic a Windsor chair. I was able to purchase the plan for a dining chair designed by Kevin Rodel. Mr. Rodel’s chair was published in a Fine Woodworking 2007 magazine and has a cushion seat. This plan did give me insight into his chair’s construction. I started the design/prototype build process by making hand sketches on paper, and then latter I made sketches using SketchUp. I determined the chairs overall dimension, including the seat cant, back support cant, and the chair’s line-of-sight. Then I started to sketch the seat blank. There were many sketch iterations using SketchUp. I wanted the seat to completely cover the chair front and side rails and I wanted stretchers between the front and rear legs to help make for a more robust design. This chair seat will not swivel (like the bar stools), so the tilt will have to be built into the structure. The tilt allows for a more comfortable sit. There is a need to have the seat and structure taper from the front to the back to allow the line-of-sight to be pleasing to the eye. Poplar wood was selected for the prototype material. After making detail sketches, I made a parts list and a plan for execution. The plan included a design selection for each joint and documenting what was need for templates and jigs. The side chair design/build utilized more than 16 different “shop made” tools. I can provide more information and pics as time allows. Thank you for looking. Danl
  2. Have you ever completed a project and admired it, only to find a flaw that ONLY you can ever know about? If so, did you forget it or fix it?
  3. Hi Guys, anyone really like fooling around on Sketch Up? I'd love to get some help coming up with a design for a scrap wood bin that would fit under my stairs but will have the most variety of cubbies and sizes of bins. Any takers?
  4. Most of you know that I dabble with Christmas tree ornaments and that sometimes my mind gets off the main road. I had a design in my mind and kept drawing and improving the design. It is hard to tell in the pictures that it has four extensions of the same design. I didn't know how it would turn out, so I made it of pine. I wish now I had used a quality hardwood.
  5. A blog written by Jeff Branch to help the reader learn to use Sketchup for furniture design. https://jeffbranchww.com/2018/07/08/designing-furniture-in-sketchup/
  6. Another busy week here for the Patriot turners! @Ron Altier asked a question concerning the angle on the skew chisel- curved or straight? Seems most of your turners prefer the straight cutting edge. Why not head over to Ron's post and provide him with your preference- @oldwoodie Asked for our input on assembling pen kits. He is concerned about installing the pen refill in an older pen kit- He was also unsure about whether pressed in parts need to be glued in place- I know some of you have turned pens and you may be able to help him out. I have always had trouble trying to make my turning look more elegant. They always seem out of proportion or clunky. I've read about the "Golden Mean" and how it can be used to create a visually appealing product. And then there is the "Rule of Thirds". Which to use??? Here is some reference material to help make that decision (or make it more confusing). I pulled these from the Internet and have left the authors details within each- http://www.westbaywoodturners.com/tutorial/pdf_files/Woodturning_Design.pdf This link show a plane for creating a "golden section gauge"- http://www.goldennumber.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/golden-section-gauge.gif Finally a detailed video explanation of the Golden Mean and why it may not be so important. Be warned, the video is quite lengthy- While answering an email from another site, I found this marvelous turning site- http://hampstevens.com/ Mr. Stevens will graciously provide instructions on how to turn these seemingly impossible spheres. If interested, he can be contacted at- hamp@hampstevens.com @Jim from Easy Wood Tools and our friend from Easy Wood Tools posted a video introducing the Easy Wood Tools with Tracey Malady. This is a great video for those interested in getting started with Easy Wood Tools. You may have recently read that the Easy Wood Tools are now available in the UK! Our fellow turners, across the pond, will finally get to use the best turning tools on the planet! Not only are the EWT tools available in the UK but also the absolutely awesome Easy Wood Easy Chuck! It's always nice to be able to make your own turning tools instead of buying them. Mike Peace shows us how to make a beading tool and a captive ring tool in a couple of his latest videos. Safe turning
  7. lew

    Lathe Magic

    Free program to design turnings.
  8. For those who followed my series, I totally forgot to post pictures of my stairs after it was completely done, sorry guys and gals. A close up of how flawlessly the treads and risers fit into the routed stringers, (see part 5 for pics of the stringers and how it's put together). Yes, there is a kink in the wall rail, due to a run change between the upper 7 treads and the lower 4 treads, (see part 6 as to why). The top of the balusters fit into a hole drilled in the underside of the rail, the bottoms sit in a hole drilled into the tread, epoxy is put into the holes on the treads to keep them from moving and rattling, small pin nails are shot along side of the balusters on the top to keep them from rattling, basically the nails wedge the balusters against the rail. I used small trim screws to secure the left side of the tread to the stinger and placed the screws so that the shoe on the balusters would cover them. Also got the sliding barn doors done that encloses the utility room, and am currently working on the curved bar. Looks like a small bar, but the bar top will overhang by 10-12" which will in effect make it bigger.
  9. For caringing/moving 3-4 layer cake. Cut a circle from 1/2'' ply 10&1/2'' across. Drill 1/4'' deep for 4 1/2'' dowels bout 2'' long, make sure they ALL SIT DOWN RITE. pull'm out glue'm in, let'm dry, check'm ,may need to sand 1 er 2 so they all do their job. ALRIGHTY THE TOP: bore 4 - 5 holes for 1/2 or 3/8 X couple inches to stand at attention AROUND THE PLATTER to keep that PRECIOUS CAKE FROM SLIDIN OFF, case the toater makes a MIS-STEP. LEGS UNDERNEATH CREATES A SPACE FOR HANDS/FINGERS TO GO FOR A GRIP TO PICK IT UP. MOST IMPORTANT !! Consult baker bout stain / painting. BE SURE TO PUT A NAME ON BOTTOM, VE'DONT, FIRST BIG GET TOGETHER IT GOES TO IT WONT COME BACK HOME WIT'U.
  10. I think it was Lew posted a clip of a kid burning patterns with a micro wave transformer   So I tried it using an old neon sign transformer that maybe produces a hundred thousand volts at  zero amps and got this           It's sort of interesting.  I need more power to  cover more than the meager few inches I've to  there. I didn't feel like I had any control at all. The burn marks went where they went and that was it.   Moving  one of the electrodes  didn't change much about that tree pattern that was propagating but it did produce localized unpleasant spot burning  in other places.   But while I was doing this it occurred to me that I wouldn't want to have the piece on my lathe while doing it for fear that the random high voltage might  be able to find its way  into the lathe's circuitry and fry it.  So if you try this and have more a lathe with some electronics maybe consider doing  the work  on a bench and not on your lathe  I tried my AC welder and got nuthin' in Stick mode.   Maybe a DC welder would work better.          
  11. 4 downloads

    Wood Carving, Design and Workmanship is a book by George Jack, Copyright Year of 1903. This book was downloaded from the Google Books Project.
  12. First I must tell you that my shop is half of a garage and that all tools, benches have to be portable. I can't do large projects and really don't care to, so all is well with what I have. Over the years my space has changed to accommodate new things and to make the most used items handy. First, there are never enough sharp pencils and they always hide somewhere. Next was the tools I use to do small jobs and repairs. Then there are the measuring rules and tapes I know I usually can't find. I try to keep most things within reach and not have to go on a search mission. As I looked over my ever evolving workbench, design/layout table and wondered what others do. So I am asking you to post some pictures to show what you do for your bench/layout/design area. Here is mine
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