Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

The Patriot Woodworkers with Operation Ward 57 Adopt a Wounded Warrior Family for the Holidays - 2019 project is live, please click on link to view our very special annual project.

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'craftsman'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • The Woodworking Discussion Forum
    • Introduce Yourself
    • General Woodworking
    • Wood Turners
    • Wood Carving
    • Hand Tools
    • Scroll Sawing
    • Show Us Your Woodworking Shops
    • Finishing
    • CNC
    • Tools, Research, Reviews and Safety
    • Plans and Software
    • The Veterans Corner and Causes Forum
  • The Old Machinery Discussion Forum
    • Old Woodworking Machinery
    • Old Metalworking Machinery
    • Old Machinery Operating and Restoration Tips
    • Old Woodworking Machinery Archive
    • Old Machinery Badges and Decals
  • The Home Improvement Forum
    • Home Improvement
    • Patio and Outdoors
  • The Scrap Bin
    • Free for All
    • The Classified, Swap and Sale
    • Patriot Woodworker Member Meetings
    • The Patriot's Pulse
    • Announcements
    • Network Tutorials
    • Bugs and Issues

Categories

  • Book and Literature
  • CNC Files
    • CAD Files
    • CAM Files
    • CNC Reference and Tutorials
  • General Woodworking
    • Shop Charts
    • Shop Jigs
    • Shop Furniture
    • Arts and Crafts
    • Furnishings
    • Musical Instruments
    • Wooden Toys
    • Yard and Outdoors
  • Home Improvement
  • Old Machinery Badge & Decal Images
    • Beaver Power Tools-Callander Foundry
    • Delta Specialty Co.
    • Delta Mfg. Co.
    • Delta Milwaukee
    • Delta Rockwell
    • Walker Turner
    • Sears Companion
    • Sears Craftsman
    • Sears Dunlap
  • Sketchup Sharing Center
    • Furnishings
    • Shop Jigs
    • Arts and Crafts
    • Sketchup Tutorials
  • Scroll Saw Patterns

Blogs

  • Building A Walnut Shotgun Case
  • Military Challenge Coin Display Build
  • SJUSD Veterans Recieve Plaques from Patriot Tigers
  • The Pastor’s Table or I Think My Sister Is Trying To Buy My Way Into Heaven
  • Small Patch Musings and Such
  • Steve Krumanaker
  • Christmas 2016
  • Photography
  • Cherry Entertainment Center
  • Another Church Table
  • Inside Out Turning
  • Segmented Turning
  • Canon Ball Bed
  • Situation Normal, All Fired Up
  • DUST COLLECTORS 101
  • Workbench PIP
  • Republishing the French Rolling Pin blog
  • Thickness Sander

Product Groups

  • Old Hand Tools
  • New Hand Tools
  • Freedom Caps
  • T-Shirts

Marker Groups

  • Members
  • Sponsors
  • Administrators
  • Forum Hosts

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First Name


Last Name


My Location


My Woodworking Interests


My skill level is


Website URL


Favorite Quote


AIM


MSN


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Facebook URL


Twitter Feed URL


My Clubs and Organizations

Found 42 results

  1. Interesting article. I, too, worked for Sears for a couple of years, but have become disappointed their products and customer service since.
  2. A few weeks back, I posted a thread about a pick that included a Black & Decker corded drill kit. I also have alluded to the fact I may have a problem when it comes to the number of corded drills in my possession. Since the temperature is dropping and we alternate between white-out snow then momentary sunshine and now darkness, I thought I would present this thread for your entertainment, amusement, amazement and harassment. Enjoy the show. WARNING: Proceeding beyond this point is at your own risk. The content of this thread is not advised for those with rational thought processes or hoarding phobias. Some restrictions apply. Void where prohibited. Must be 18 to enter. So it began one December 7th many years ago for my 17th (maybe 18th??) birthday I think. I received my first power-tool. A Skil, 3/8" VS Model 569 drill. Who knew this would eventually lead to an addiction. I did replace the swithc once several years ago. Shortly there-after, my dad also gave me a 1/4" Mall Model 143 drill that had belonged to my grand-father. It has to be from the late 1940's to early 1950's. The original cord finally disintegrated. I replaced it 35+ years ago with the current cord which now needs replaced. I need to search out cord strain reliefs although the spark plug boots i used to use worked pretty well. These were my primary drills for years both at home and occasionally in my work life. The Mall has a piece missing in the replaceable handle portion which is the way I inherited it. That nugget of information is relevant later on in this drill dynasty. Next up is my Black & Decker 1/2" VS, Model 7210. It's story begins in the first JD Dealership I worked. That was in 1973. The drill was already in service and likely had been purchased in the late 1960's from Grainger's. The dealer eventually closed so we parted ways for a year or so. A new dealer reopened the dealership and I was recruited as the Service Manager Low and behold the drill and I was reunited as most of the tooling from the old dealership had been purchased. Some time later, one of the "rookie" mechanics pushed this drill beyond its limits. The armature windings separated from the commutator bar. A replacement was needed immediately and as luck had it, the Mac Tool Rep had just began carrying a new line called Makita. We purchased a 1/2", VSR double insulated drill upon his recommendation. We sent the B&D in for repair evaluation estimate. The cost to replace the armature, brushes and refurb the drill came back more than the new Makita so this drill got tossed back in the cabinet. Several years later during a clean-up session the drill was set out to be trashed. I asked if I could have it and was granted the request. It laid in a box at home for a number of years. I finally made a trip to the old B&D Service Center in Indy, bought an armature, couple set of brushes for around $35 at the time. Finally had to replace the cord a few years back. While doing some remodeling work at my daughters, either my ex SIL or oldest grandson apparently dropped the drill on the "nib" on the upper back handle breaking it in the mounting screw/rear bearing housing. Calling B&D/DeWalt Service Centers all over the country yielded no parts available. I eventually was able to locate a "parts donor" drill but not before lots of searching which leads to a long tale yet to come. I have the original manual and dead-man handle for the drill also. It was and still is a great drill...low RPM and lots of torque. In the midst of the above I acquired this old Sioux, 1/4" in-line drill. It was given to me by a former mechanic. Probably from the 50's. The switch was bad as was the original cord (dry rot). It is the same frame and motor unit as the old Sioux hard-seat grinder. Instead of the angle seat driver head, Sioux offered an alternative drive head. I came upon a used hard seat grinder the Mac Tool Rep had traded for. The gears were bad, but the was switch good...gave a couple bucks for it. Replaced the switch. This drill still gets a lot of use running a carbon cleaning brush and other wire wheel attachments. Probably will need a new cord in the not to distant future. Somewhere in the 90's, I had a need for a D-handle 1/2" drill; something that would do heavier duty work than the 1/2" B&D. My wife bought me this Craftsman for Christmas one year. VSR model. Actually my first reversible corded drill. I primarily have used it to run a paddle to mix drywall compound and thin set mortar. Maybe have drilled a couple dozen 5/8" dia. holes in steel with a twist bit. The (3) on the right followed. The left one is a 1/4" Dunlap made for Sears; circa late 40's early 50's; bought at a flea market for a couple of bucks; it works fine, just needs disassembled, cleaned, new gear grease and the aluminum body polished; The middle is another Mall 143; another flea market find for $3; I originally bought it to use for parts my old 143 however it works great, so again just disassemble, clean, re-lube and polish. The one on the right is an old Montgomery Ward given to me by my late FIL. He got it in a box of crap treasures at an auction. Obviously needs a cord and the normal clean & re-lube. I've had it for years; just need to find round-to-its for all three. Close up view of the Dunlap tag. Also a Did just a little preliminary buffing to see how it would polish up. The Mall 143 tag. The "three amigos", oppoosite side on the far right. You can see they remain in their natural wild state...now where are those round-tu-its? Now back to the quest finding a replacement handle section for the B&D 1/2" VS. So I watched flea markets, yards sales, and even a few auctions to no avail finding a parts donor to repair this drill. Even eBay was coming up empty. Finally a hit on eBay...I won an auction for a 1/2" (one owner). If I recall about $14 with the shipping. However, when I got the drill, it was so pristine, I couldn't bring myself to cannibalize it. It had the dead-man handle but the cord had been replaced. It's the one on the left; I'm pretty sure it's a U-126 like the one on the right. Only single speed, but a very nice drill. The one on the right came later in the parts quest. Found it at a flea market for $8 with some weird coupling attachment in place of the chuck, but pristine other-wise. I bought a Jacobs chuck from H-F. $10 less 20% coupon so $8 for a new chuck bringing the total to $16. The parts quest continued...the one on the far right I believe to be a model 7120 although might be an 1161; both are 3/8" VS models. Anyways won that bid on eBay as a parts only drill...if I recall, it was ~$9 with shipping; might have been less...when I received it, as stated it did not work. Began disassembling to swap the handles and noticed a loose wire in the switch and wires not in the right locations; straighten all that out, and it works fine...so the quest rolls on. The one on the left is a Model U-100, 1/4", single speed; a little different rear handle design without the nub, but interchangeable. Picked that one up for a couple bucks...did the normal disassembly/clean-up; works great...the quest continues... While I continued to watch eBay, after two purchases all of a sudden these style drills began popping up like mushrooms. Seems every flea market I had tried before now were crawling with them... These 2 were next; a 7110 I think, 3/8" single speed in the original metal B&D box for $5. Another U-100 for $3 but needed a cord. H-F has 10' neon orange and sometimes green extension cords on sale for ~$4 from time-to-time. I keep a supply of them as replacement cords; far cheaper than actual replacement cords. Both of these work great and needed minimal clean-up. Next in the quest to find a handle were the two on the right. Finally, success. I gave $3 for the pair. Robbed the handle off the top one. The bottom one while it will run, the front bearing is shot. However I could take these two and make one good usable drill should I need an extra. Unfortunately, by this time the disease had over taken me so.................................... At one of my favorite flea infestations, I stumbled on this Skil 599. Now knowing how hard finding replacement parts for the B&D had been, I justified this purchase figuring the cord and switch would interchange with my first drill if needed. Since it was only $5. As dumb luck would have it, this is a hammer, scraper, drill VSR, 3/8". It all works so.... The drill on the right beckoned me and since I didn't own a plain ole, 3/8" VSR and it was only $5, I succumbed. Knowing how hard parts might be to get for it, the left one appeared at a yard sale. It was in a bucket, chuck down with about an 2" of water...well the cord & switch is probably good and for $2...dang the luck, it cleaned up pretty nice except for a little erosion on the nose housing, works like a champ so... This one in the original case although missing some of the accessories..still needs refurbed when I find some of those round tuits so... This orphan needed a good home and for $8 in the original case with accessories and then.... This trio actually preceded the two sets above. The one on the far right is a U-203; kinda' rare; 1/4" 2 speed. I use it a lot with various brushes to do cleaning and polishing. A slightly different version of the U-100 in the middle, then I'm not sure of the model on the left, but a 3/8" VS. Of course when the first B&D 1/2" went down, I needed an immediate, budget friendly replacement so H-F to the rescue with this 1/2" VSR model....with a coupon it was $24 and some change with tax. It works great and have used it to mix thin set and drywall compound also. So.... It all started when this drill handle failed....so....... There is one more to this stable but current weather conditions prevent me from moving stuff out to get to the cabinet. It's an old Montgomery Ward (I think), D handle with a 1/2" pipe dead man, 5/8" chuck that belonged to my grand-dad I inherited when my dad passed. That drill cost me $200 about 50 years ago. I'll update this saga with it's unique story in the future. These of course are just my corded drills and does not include any of the cordless, screw-guns or drill presses. Once I get over my shame for this post and ya'll recover from the shock and trauma of reading this post, maybe I'll entertain you in another show. Just so you know, I have put back many other drills to allow others around the world to the joy of owning a corded drill if only for a moment. Assuming you remained conscious to this point, thanks for following along. BTW, if you were counting you should have come up with 26 drills total. I may have a problem???
  3. So over the course of the spring, summer & fall when I haven't been working on the lawn mowers, mowing/trimming the acreage, working on someone's vehicle or coordinating repairs while in a shop, transporting grandkids, attending grandkid's events, tending to other family matters and maybe the occasional nap, I'd squeeze in some small tool re-conditioning from my yard sale & flea finds...Thanks for looking... This came from a yard sale...got it tossed in with a 7-1/4" Skil saw & case...all for $5; Sorry no before pictures but the screw and rails had a fair amount of surface rust, but no pitting. The jaws had some rust on front and back faces and around the perimeter. I had cleaned once & waxed once, but with our humidity year-around, it rusted again, so, disassembled, de-rust, 4 coats gun blue on the rails, screw threads(probably black oxide originally?), black paint stick to touch up the jaws and three coats of Johnson's Paste Wax. The 6" adjustable square is my new one from H-F (I know, I know berate me if you must, but it's accurate and it works for me) Next up is an original Portalign...no before pics...the posts were pretty rusted as were the thumb screws. The aluminum was corroded too. Posts were cleaned on the grinder, brass wire wheel, progressively sandded with wet-cry and machine oil from 100g to 400g, then polished on the buffer; aluminum buffed with brass wire on a Dremel then polished on the buffer as were the thumb screws. Flea market find $1. Didn't need them, BUT....before pics... and after of the combo squares; sorry poor quality of picture...No I didn't transform the tri-square to an 8" combo square. Tri-square probably won't get much more. While digging through some of my "projects" I found the 8" blade, partially cleaned. I totally forgot I had ever bought it...it came with a bundle of machinist stuff I gave about $10 for. The head, I robbed from an old 6" aluminum blade combo sq hence the purchase of the new H-F 6". Blades are a little dull due to poor lighting and un-buffed coat of Johnson's. Top is a Stanley 46-222. Probably mid to late 80's; maybe a little newer? 8" marked Bates Mfg Co, Orange Mass; Bottom no name, only Made in USA Stanley 46-222 8" Bates Mfg. ??? Made in USA Again, not best pictures; with my phone, poor lighting etc. Craftsman 2" OD Outside Calipers; these were part of that machinist bundle circa 1940's??? just based on script. I had done a little cleaning on thee before the pics just to see the name. Legs, head and threads were pretty rusty but mostly surface rust. There is one small area of pitting on one leg face/ After Dremel work, polishing with with abrasive erasers, then polishing on buffing wheel. Picture is a bit dull, as I'm leaving a coat of Johnson's but did use 3-n-1 oil on threads & pivots. My storage method, includes wrapping in wax paper, sealing in sandwich or quart freezer bag including a desiccant bag. Grandkids earn rewards finding, saving desiccant bags. A 4"? divider, 2" ID calipers and 6" dividers. The first two belonged to my grand-father, then my dad. Forgot I had them. They were an old tool cabinet that belonged to both. I rarely get into or disturb anything inside that cabinet. The bottom set, I gave a quarter at lest years Covered Bridge Festival. One point had been broken and reground more or less. Same method on top & bottom two...Dremel, abrasive eraser's, then buff. I did attempt to re-blue the nut & threads. After the picture, I noticed some flash rust from the bluing, so rebuffed with the Dremel, another coat of wax, then 3-n-1 oil on threads & pivots, wax paper, sealed bag with desiccant. The middle dividers, I used the 6" brass wire wheel, abrasive erasers, the buffing wheel progressive to Red Rouge. I did re-blue the tension nut. Rewaxed and storage same as others. The plastic point protector sleeves are repurposed from Glow-in-the-Dark sticks of the grand-kids. Small inside calipers; Lufkin Rule Co Saginaw Mich. ~mid 40's? 6" dividers"; Sargent & Co New Haven,Conn ~50's?? 4" dividers; Goodell-Pratt Co Greenfield Mass...~mid 40's??? A pair of v-blocks but only one clamp; part of that machinist too bundle. No actual before pics but these were all rust. I couldn't get the clamp off one block until it had soaked 24 plus hours in Evap_O-Rust. doing that sometimes gives a "pickled" appearance on tool steel. You can't really feel it; I tried polishing & honing it away using progressive grits of wet or dry and oil, but it didn't help much for the time invested. The only marking is the name "Stan." stamped into the ends of the blocks. I don't think these are purchased, rather made in a tool room or perhaps part of an apprentice program. Very well done, but there are tool drags marks in the grooves, and file/grind marks in side the arch of the clamp. I've got a couple other pieces in process which also appear shop made. I noticed the flash rust after the pics, so "honed" again on my granite tile with wet or dry/oil, cleaned with Brake Cleaner, light coat of oil, wrapped in wax paper and sealed off in a bag...the block plane will be in it's own post eventually. Other similar projects are in the works. Thanks for looking.
  4. Went to Lowe's today and noticed they are giving their tool department a makeover. Looks like they are dedicating a large area to Craftsman Tools. It appears the Kobalt brand is staying too. I saw a special section for Dewalt also. They are nowhere near done with the improvements so we'll have to wait and see what else is planned.
  5. Big B

    Alien

    From the album: Turnings

    Thought this one looked like something out of a star trek episode so named it the alien due to its organic shape specifically related to the finial. The hollow form is Cedar with turquoise inlay in the cracked and small voids. The headpiece or Finial is made of Bradford Pear and has turquoise inlay as well in a concentric pattern on each side which was all turned and hand carved. Size including the finial is around 14.5"x9.5". Hope you enjoy as much as I did making it.
  6. Picked a Craftsman Miter box, for $5 at a barn sale. A bit on the rusty side, seemed to be a home for wayward spiders Lovely, ain't it? Sitting on my Saw Bench, too. Well, I took the saw itself out of the box/base. Took the tote off. Shined up the three bolts. Medallion just says CRAFTSMAN. Sanded the tote a bit to clean it off. Wire brush in the drill press to get rid of the top layers of rust on the plate. Brought the plate back out to the saw bench, hooked up a palm sander and some 220 grit. sanded down to bare.clean metal. Wasn't worried about any etch. Too rusty, and Craftsman used a silk screened logo. Set the pieces to dry a bit, since I used a pad of Never dull under the sander as a last step. Buffed that out. put the saw back together Yep, it is a biggie. 22" saw. Maybe 11 or more tpi. Looks a little better? Ok, next the base. Old broom to evict about ten resident spiders, and demolish their homes. Had a sprayer cleaner from odd lots, gave the base a good soaking down. Then a wipe down. Couple places had some rust going on, sanded that off. About time to put this saw back together Does look just a little better, don't it now. As for the base Yep, you can read every degree on that scale. Rollers work nice and smooth. Still learning about all the locks this thing has. The levers seem to lock the rollers in the "up" spot. That thumbscrew thingy seems to be some sort of depth stop? No, I haven't found a motor under there, nor a place to plug in a battery. Not too bad, for a $5 saw?
  7. About a week ago I was building a set of stairs for my son's new place, when the old Craftsman router started to shake badly. I drove home and got the Triton from my router table, which fortunately is equipped with the same Lee Valley base, so it would work in the jig. It ALSO vibrated, so I exchanged the 1/4" shank bit for a 1/2" one. WHAT A DIFFERENCE! Later that night I dismantled the Craftsman and found that a wood chip had been sucked up into the fan, bending it badly and breaking off two of the blades. The vibration resulted in a crack across the 1/4" bit shaft, creating the problem with the Triton. The Craftsman has served me well... I've had it for well over 40 years! However, after hearing of many problems with the newer ones, I won't be buying another one. A small Bosch may be in my future. Not the clearest picture, but can you make out the two bottom lines? THOSE WERE THE DAYS! John
  8. Look at what jumped me from a pile of junk. It's an "Alien" head 2" X 6" surface planer! Made for Sears by Central Specialty Co. which later became part of King-Seeley Corp. I found it listed in Sears catalogs from 1941 through 1964. I couldn't find a 1965 catalog but they are not listed in the 1966 catalog. These were sold under two different model numbers 103.1801, & 103.23700 in their later years. This one has the 103.1801 model number on the tag. Here's a few more photos for your enjoyment. These are a manual feed surface planer that will do a 6" wide board in a single pass, or a 12" wide board by feeding both sides. BTW, I lost the fight, and just had to adopt it.
  9. I have long considered Skil as a non-pro, Joe Garage, DIY tool line, with the possible exception of their worm-drive circular saws. (I don't know if it's still true, but the brand used to be part of Bosch). Now that's changing, https://www.protoolreviews.com/tools/power/cordless/drills-drivers-cordless/skil-20v-brushless-impact-driver-review/44407/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=skil_makes_us_question_their_diy_status_plus_our_latest_giveaway_and_more&utm_term=2019-04-03 Stanley Black & Decker has acquired a bunch of lines and is now re-inventing Craftsman tools that are being sold in Ace, Menards, Lowe's and Home Depot. I don't know if they've engineered better tools and just made them red and black or not. And the Porter-Cable line, long a dependable pro-line tool, are largely drifting down and DeWalt is/has emerged in that role. I guess now you'll have to do a lot of research before buying a new tool and not just rely on the color scheme.
  10. Will the "real" Craftsman tools, please stand-up. Not surprising this dispute would surface sooner-than-later... Stanley sues Sears
  11. Tony Konovaloff is a hand tool woodworker.
  12. A blog by Jim Tolpin and George Walker on hand tools and shops and courses and books.
  13. Saw recently Menard's is now advertising Craftsman tool boxes so apparently will not be exclusive to Lowe's. Wonder what impact if any it will have have Menard's branded Performax & Masterforce tool storage? I know many of you don't have access to a Menard's since they more regional to the Midwest & mid-South... Menard's Sale Circular
  14. From mid summer to recent when I'm in the Emerald City and as time allows, I try to stop by Habitat for Humanity Restore and a few of the indoor flea markets...Below is stuff that followed me to my truck. As always, keep your arms & legs inside the ride at all times and be sure your safety harness is buckled. No Smoking is allowed and you must be 18 to enter or accompanied by an adult. This offer is not valid in all areas. If you call now we'll double your order, just pay a separate fee. Immediately discontinue use and contact your doctor if a rash appears or you have trouble breathing. Some restrictions apply and never feed the animals. Restrooms are on the right. In the unlikely event we have to abandon ship please make sure you are wearing clean underwear. Thank-you for using our services. We hope you had an enjoyable experience. Please take time to fill out the survey at the end. Left over projects from the old HD Kid's Workshop they used to hold on Saturday mornings. (2) of each, Toolbox & Sail Boat. Hopefully my two grandsons can help me assemble these next spring/summer Cost me 50 cents/each Local flea market...Craftsman Marking Gauge complete with blue marking chalk dust. Circa 1960's...How much was it? It you answered $2.14 you are correct. State of Indiana gets their 7%. It was only a buck...'er buck o seven. Any markings & etchings eroded away. Surprisingly, it's nearly dead on at 6" I'm thinking a Stanley but ???? This was after I had buffed off the worst of the rust. 25 cents each, scale not included...only for demonstration purposes; finials are white oak I had to dig deep for these treasures. The two reamers, center punch which appears to be a reground broken pin punch, the 6 (no name) and 10 (Irwin) and the old rubber band totaled 50 cents The ratcheting screwdriver,no name, but marked Made in USA (maybe a Dunlap) also 50 cents. The (3) countersinks + the rubber band another 50 cents. 2/3 never used or minimal. The other, maybe it will work in wood or plastic. Cornucopia of treasures between a flea market & H4H Restore. Biscuits, 10 cents/container; miter gauge marked $2; 50 cents; large zip-tye bundle 10 cents; collet wrench-quarter, 1/4"-1/2" tap t-handle 50 cents' 1/4" chuck key, dime, large pencil boxes, new (6 total) 50 cents/ea, Stanley Handyman ratcheting screwdriver w/ #2 bit, missing cap, 50 cents; brown jersey gloves, priceless; that & they were from home inventory Craftsman BS Blade, NIP, marked $3; discount orange tag made it $1 Quarter/each Little 6" tri-square before picks; Two more 12" combo squares; blue head one is a Stanley 46-222; circa late 1970's-1980's; other Made in USA; Combo squares have been re-conditioned & will be appearing in a separate thread coming soon to your neighborhood. Price what you see is it not counting Indiana's 7% "finders fee." Didn't need them that's for sure...probably should seek counseling or something. (2) 11/32 x 1/4" dr shallow sockets (those were for my brother he lost his) and 1/4" x 10mm shallow (for me in my spare collection) & what turned out to be a Sargent Block plane but it looks almost identical to Dunlap block; dime each for the sockets, quarter for the Craftsman ignition wrench and a buck for the plane. Cast know is broken; slightly different than the Dunlap...maybe an older version??? Dunlap on the right. It's been in the re-furb shop for some time...one of these days??? Could be twins. Yes that is 30o on the Dunlap iron. You don't want to hear why? I won't make the same mistake on the Sargent. Well probably not. Yeah, I bought another one of these B&D's...I'm up to an embarrassing number now. Is was missing the chuck key which I had; buffed the rust off the chuck for the photo shoot. Came with the 7/32" bit...it needs sharpened; Thorsen combination box end wrench belonged to my grandfather. I've had it over 50 years. 3/8" single speed; still needs dis-assembled, gear head cleaned, grease replaced, but works great. A whole lot of spindles and such...25 cent/bag. I think 29 bags total Couple more pencil boxes...Grandson's each got one (not pictured) to start school. O yeah, a Disston 12" back saw...thought I took a picture of the saw, but just the tag...saw is a little rough, needs cleaned and sharpened...$1...pictures in the next episode of Poor Man's Pickings. Well there you have it...keeps me off the golf course, out of bars, jail and money, but hey, somebody's got to do it. Until next time...Y'all hurry back now. Ya hear? And don't forget boys & girls, mail in your box tops along with $99.99 and receive a box of genuine, farm fresh, sawdust where you can make your own chip board. Some assembly required. Wood glue not included. Oh yeah...Survey! What survey? We don't need no stinking survey!
  15. Stumbled upon this tonight...worth the look...once in a lifetime goldmine find for NIB vintage tools. https://indianapolis.craigslist.org/tls/d/vintage-craftsman-and-other/6655669969.html
  16. https://www.consumerreports.org/tools-power-equipment/lowe-s-is-now-selling-craftsman-tools/ I have mixed opinions on Craftsman. Their mechanic's tools are OK, and at one time one of the few alternatives. Now, everyone has a lifetime warranty -- Kobalt, Husky, Channelock, GearWrench, Harbor Freight. They're all readily available at the ubiquitous big box stores or corner hardware. And what used to be Sears' swap across the counter is now, "Here's your rebuild kit." There are a few decent power and woodworking tools, but I think they've been on a slow decline for 40+ years. Those who say "Craftsman is the best," are living in the '50s and '60s. And with the vendor du jour, it's often hard to get replacement parts a few years down the line because they've changed suppliers and no longer carry parts. Let's just say, I have about all the wrenches I'll ever need and don't see myself buying any Craftsman woodworking tools. Heard an article on the radio yesterday about how Sears is on a downward spiral, selling brands, selling real-estate. They remarked that Kenmore was a reputable brand, but as far as I know it's still manufactured by Whirlpool
  17. I cashed in on the Emerson $100.00 recall on my Craftsman radial arm saw. Now What? I don't want to make a pin router. What else can the remaining frame and jack be used for? No I don't have a boat.
  18. So a couple of months back, you may recall this Craftsman combo square followed me home...working on it a bit here, bit there, finally got it presentable... About the only place not heavily rusted was where the head had sat for decades.... Before it all went into the Evap-O-Rust tank. I had hit the worst of the scale with a slow speed brass wheel. Heavy rusting and pitting on the head surfaces Ta-da...sorry for the poor lighting; discoloration (rust looking) is the reflection off my rust red t-shirt. A lot of lapping on my sharpening plate first with 100g, 220g, 320g, 400g, wet or dry...all was done dry. The head is cast steel The pitting here also is present on the face side; not sure but might have partially been a casting flaw/blow-out when cast. It cleaned up pretty nice...wish I had some machinist greying to coat the surface While i was at it I finished cleaning this one too. You might recall what it originally looked like (one with red zip tie) holding the square head made in Taiwan...turns out the blade is marked Made in U.S.A., No.1270 M F Co. (Millers-Falls). I added the bottom head; no name or markings but seemed appropriate for this blade. Thanks for looking...last one out please turn off the lights.
  19. Dear folks, I have been in a quandary lately, I have some extra funds for this year, and I would like to purchase a table saw. But I cannot decide which one I want, so I am coming to the membership to help me decide. You'll see a poll I created with the table saws I have in mind to purchase. Can you please participate in my poll, and vote for the brand you find most reliable in your experience. Thanks! This is a test topic for our new polling feature, please see tutorial at:
  20. oldwoodie

    Sargent

    Picked up a 408(I think is same as Stanley #4 ) Sargent hand plane that was clean, sharp and ready to go for $10.00. How bad did I do? My thinking is to sell all my Stanley Baileys and Baileys and use the lesser knowns for my work. I have some others like Dunlop, Craftsman, Buck Brothers, etc. I can pick up Stanley knockoffs with no name, and if it fits my hand, is well made, and is in good shape, I can always do all right. What do you say about my theory? Also, I turned down Wood Magazine's last offer because they shut down our community forum. I would not be surprised if they quit publishing it in the next few years if as many people are mad at them as I think they are. I was going to return their offer with this explanation as to why I decided to drop them after more than 20 years of subscriptions.
  21. Since I've been hostage for the past month + between swim meets/events, furnace outages along with truck transmissions & alternators, finally had a "fun day" after my brief time getting a haircut to break the cabin fever. Stopped at a couple flea markets...not much in the offerings of interest or priced above new in store prices but I did pick up these treasures for total of $5. Sorry for the fuzzy picture(s). Must have been a thumb print on my phone lens??? As always, didn't need any of it (well the clip boards) but somebody had to rescue them. Craftsman 12" Machinist Combo Square, a small miter gauge and the two clip boards. I'm always misplacing my clip boards. Probably where ever my missing pencils are at or where the grand-kids last used them?? It'll take a little work, but I think it will clean up pretty well. Square head is all steel and complete with scribe. A little heft to this one From the paint color and Craftsman script I'm guessing latter part of the 1950's to very early 1960's. Same color that was used on some of their early table & RAS's.
  22. Another collection of peculiar workshop related items. The stories and pictures you are about to see are real. Call it an obsession, sickness, hoarding, or missing fence rescue, IDK why I do it...I just do... Before you judge me and my madness illness, you should first speak to those voices in my head. Rest assured once you do, you'll be snatching orphan fences from the hands of the weak and infirmed too. With maybe a couple of exceptions, all have been $1 or less. those on the right probably 10-30 cents/ea. The Craftsman on the far left was a buck (maybe less), NIB at a yard sale. Some of the others again were 50 cents or less and maybe in a bucket or box with other "treasures" for a buck or two. Same pic as above, only with the box closed. If I recall, these two were $3...purchased from a Habitat for Humanity Restore in Illinois. Must have come out of a retailer who had a fire since there was soot all the packages and the packages were stained like water damage. The B&D will be assigned to a new old stock B&D 7-1/4" circular saw I bought at a flea market for $20. It was missing the fence. circular saw obsession will be a future post unless good weather comes first. As twisted as it may seem, there at least another 6 or 8 not pictured here. They've actually been assigned to orphan tools. Two of which were identical and perfect for my 5-1/2" cordless 19.2V Craftsman and my 18V Ryobi. Another was assigned to an old Craftsman Jig saw I rescued and re-furbed. I think I gave my ex-SIL a couple too. Well thanks for looking...they tell me it's time for my meds.
  23. So a week or so ago, I posted on a recent Craftsman Machinist combo square I added to my growing stable. As I noted then, I didn't need it, but it was $2 and needed a rust revival... Why didn't I really need it? Well... Sorry pictures aren't the greatest but I was (am still) fighting cold cooties. Before picture conditions for most of these appear in other threads, so I won't bore you here. Top one: Craftsman Machinist recently purchased; one below w/ red strap I bought a few weeks ago for ~$1; I thought was a a cheapo Taiwan since that's what the square head was labeled; it was missing the retaining bolt/nut/spring After some serious clean-up of the blade, turns out it was a mismatch; The blade is marked Made in U.S.A., No.1270 M F Co. (Millers-Falls)...sometimes a blind squirrel finds a nut too. Next two below top: 12" has been my go to for a long time; bought new ~1975; It's a John Deere made by Stanley; 6" is an Empire probably ~1977-78; bought new at Furrow Lumber Company; To their right: 18" is a Starrett blade; I think I gave a buck for it but was in pretty good condition after rust revival; the square head is ???; bought at flea market or yard sale for a buck or less; the center head bought at a flea market for a couple bucks if I remember correctly? It appears to have rust on the leg but must be a shadow b/c it's clean Two at bottom of picture: Black square head is Union Tool Co, Mass.; Gray square head, is a Corsair which eventually was bought by Empire; the second square head is unmarked, but was complete so I made a caliper of sorts Blue angle head: Stanley No.125. It was missing the retaining bolt/nut/spring but the darker blue Stanley square head to the right become a donor; The two holes in the blade and near the square head body are where the previous owner drilled and put in a couple screws after he lost/broke the bolts/nut; I gave a buck or two for it and maybe a buck for the two heads; The Stanley is well suited for rough carpentry and can be positioned to lay out studs 16" OC. One immediately below: It's an older Great Neck blade bought at a yard for a quarter maybe? The square head was later added: all the extra square heads have been purchased for a buck or less; The 4 pc set at the bottom: Is a Starrett Machinist; it belonged to my grand-father; My best guess it is from the late 1940's; It's been tucked away since early 1995 after my dad died; I started the refurb on it late last fall...still a ways to go. The square head nut is stowed away A little better view of the Starrett Almost forgot this one. A 6", no markings except Made in England; the blade is aluminum versus steel; it's got a couple waves in it, but hey for 50 cents... So did I need the Craftsman? But since I didn't have a Craftsman before, I suppose I did? Believe it or not, I've passed on several but they're usually too pricey...sometimes $3-$5 or more...will I buy more? If the price is right and the square head speaks to me. Maybe someday I'll get paroled from the National Weather Service and put on work release. Until then, this is the best I can do. Thanks for looking.
  24. Earlier this spring I made a few picks at yard sales and the "Flea Market Warehouse." Pictures were taken, but things got busy with the wreck, dealing with the that, kids activities, mowing, mower repair, more mowing, etc. well you get the idea... Anyways, since things are a little less hectic, a few more shots of the every growing "treasure trove." I'll try to be considerate and only post a couple threads a day less I bore you...Thanks for looking. These items were in the Craftsman Router case below...$2...I've hidden the router plate inserts from myself since this picture...could use them since I misplaced the ones that came with my router table The Massey-Ferguson magnetic clip was an extra 75 cents. It's from an area dealership from back in the 60's-70's...compliments my John Deere smalls collection I had an old school Craftsman router which needed a case...fit perfectly in this one...it also needed the base and collet wrench This collection set me back $13.25 with tax. Like new, 1/4" drive Craftsman ratchet, with full set of 1/4" deep metric sockets, the extension and a shallow well, 1/4" dr. 10 mm socket...The picture of them is after clean-up and time at the buffer; T-15 Craftsman driver...came in handy during the Jeep Ignition switch replacement; Kobalt 10" pipe wrench with minimal use; picture of it is after clean-up; a coupe more collet wrenches for ???; faucet wrench; the rust on the handle swing has been removed and polished since this; Stanley 3 pc chisel set minus the 1" The shaft stop collar has a 5/8" bore ID...I've used it in a couple of temporary fashions, but it became a valuable asset when I figured out how it could be used to repair a mower deck idler arm. I bought a couple more from the local Fastenal, welded to the idler arm and fixed a poor design, plaguing problem on my J.D. F510...Saved about $35 and works better. The stud is 5/16" NC threads with a 7/16" hex...I'll use it for something sooner or later. Will need a little work; the 3/4" might have been used to remove siding nails, IDK; other than the edges, both still have the protective varnish on the shafts
×
×
  • Create New...