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Puzzle table lazy Susan

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Guys, thanks for the advice and encouragement. Dan, I rebuild my strap clamp and got rid of all the hooks and it worked way better this time. Not much time in the shop this week so just one more layer added to the banding. Am planning to use a router jig to trim all three bands to the same level. I see some people using a dovetail bit for this does this ease into the cut more gently to help with blowout?spacer.png

band clamp.jpg

banding 2x.jpg

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 I would add a board 90 digress to a straight or flush trim bit and attach it to your router base. Drill a hole near the edge of the board slightly larger than the bit, basically a flush trim fence.

With the router in the horizontal position ease the bit into the wood till the fence sets flat to the table top then hold down the fence and follow the top with the router.

 

x1k.jpg.ebc806567a46dcddf5a5dadac405337a.jpg 

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Bob, thank you for the great explanation. I will use this in some future build for sure. I guess my question wasn't complete enough as what I want to do is ride the jig flat on the laminate top and cut down all 3 layers of banding to about 3/16-1/4" above that surface so the puzzle pieces don't get pushed off the sides of the surface. I'm envisioning a jig with the router mounted off the end of a flat surface just like my circle cutting version but higher to clear the the banding. The exterior of the banding will need something to support the router from tipping. I watched on video I think it was from Jimmy DiResta where he placed a weight on the back side to counteract the tipping.

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On 2/3/2020 at 6:28 AM, Pat Meeuwissen said:

trim all three bands to the same level.

 You said level & I thought flush.

 

 I see were using a dovetail bit could reduce blow out. I would worry that moving too fast could cause the bit to act like a chisel. Maybe keeping the bit slightly off center to the outside edge would solve this. 

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I reckon I will be odd man out here, or maybe I am not quite understanding the issue being presented.

 

As I read it, you have your basic table and you have edge banded with solid strips and now (in a break from tradition) want the edge banding to sit proud by 1/4" rather than flush with the table top surface.

I am sure you can make a router jig to do an exacting job.

How I might tackle this would be to cut a length of 1/4" spacer material with and maybe 2 foot long +/- and on one side cut an arc to match the outside edge of the table top.  Doesn't even have to be an exact arc, but closer is better.  This would lay flush to the inside of the edging.  Using this, I would slide it around the table top and mark a uniform 1/4" thickness on the inside of the edging.  Then I would clamp that sacrificial spacer to the table top up against the edging and use a belt sander to get close to the line, moving the spacer around the table top.  After the belt sander clean up the balance by hand sanding and ease the edges.  No tear out to worry about, if you have a fresh sheet of 12" sandpaper you can simply cut a piece of 1 by 12" long to get a nice long sanding block and result in a pretty darn close to flat surface on the edging.

 

If I haven't understood the issue, please disregard:)

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Any straight bit should work as Gene showed it should be wider than the strips so that it is all cut across in one pass. If the cut is deeper than 1/8 I would so this in several passes. Note if you enter this cut too fast you could blow out the outside.

 

Another thought on this cut is to take it easy as cutting the edge of a thin surface is tricky. Try to practice by setting up a trial blank with straight trim to get the feel of what this cut will do and how much you can take at one pass.

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14 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

And, enter from the outside. Less chance of a blow out.

This definitely what I was planning, and very fine cuts, if I go around 5 times to cut an 1/8 I'm ok with that.

 

20 hours ago, Cal said:

I reckon I will be odd man out here, or maybe I am not quite understanding the issue being presented.

 

As I read it, you have your basic table and you have edge banded with solid strips and now (in a break from tradition) want the edge banding to sit proud by 1/4" rather than flush with the table top surface.

I am sure you can make a router jig to do an exacting job.

How I might tackle this would be to cut a length of 1/4" spacer material with and maybe 2 foot long +/- and on one side cut an arc to match the outside edge of the table top.  Doesn't even have to be an exact arc, but closer is better.  This would lay flush to the inside of the edging.  Using this, I would slide it around the table top and mark a uniform 1/4" thickness on the inside of the edging.  Then I would clamp that sacrificial spacer to the table top up against the edging and use a belt sander to get close to the line, moving the spacer around the table top.  After the belt sander clean up the balance by hand sanding and ease the edges.  No tear out to worry about, if you have a fresh sheet of 12" sandpaper you can simply cut a piece of 1 by 12" long to get a nice long sanding block and result in a pretty darn close to flat surface on the edging.

 

If I haven't understood the issue, please disregard:)

Cal, I have never built one of these before but the examples I found online all have a small lip as not to let the puzzle pieces slide off the edge. Over such a large radius my belt sanding skill would not produce my nice even result. I do have myself made a long sanding block using some sanding belts and do you use them frequently. Thanks for your support.

By the way what's the fun of doing the norm, not in my nature. ;)

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15 hours ago, Gerald said:

Any straight bit should work as Gene showed it should be wider than the strips so that it is all cut across in one pass. If the cut is deeper than 1/8 I would so this in several passes. Note if you enter this cut too fast you could blow out the outside.

 

Another thought on this cut is to take it easy as cutting the edge of a thin surface is tricky. Try to practice by setting up a trial blank with straight trim to get the feel of what this cut will do and how much you can take at one pass.

Thanks, while gluing on the last layer I will make up a sample and do some practicing. 

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