Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Sign in to follow this  
kmealy

Woods for outdoors

Rate this topic

Topic Summary

Created

Last Reply

Replies

Views

kmealy -
6
139

Top Posters


Recommended Posts

Good article on outdoor woods: https://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/lumber/outdoor-lumber?cid=369791&did=369791-20190425&mid=20453126205&utm_campaign=wood-online_newsletter&utm_content=042519&utm_medium=email&utm_source=woodmagazine.com

 

I probably have mentioned this before:   In the town I moved from 3 years ago, they were looking to replace the wood in the park benches (cast frames).   They went to the store that Steve Mickley (prior host of finishing at Wood Forums) and asked for some red oak.   He told them, once he found out what they wanted it for, was that he'd put them on a two-year re-order schedule because it wouldn't last outside.   He recommended Ipe.   They sprung for it.   One of the benches was in front of the park that was 100 yards away from my house there and I walked past it 4 or 5 times a week.   It was a busy street and I'm sure it got regular sprays of salt-treated slush (the city used to send past all their plows, 5 of them, in a convoy during snowfalls).    It aged to a beautiful gray, no great cracking,and no mossy residue that I've often seen on teak.   It looked great after about 15 years of nothing.


I also had a job once to replace a back support on an Adirondack chair.  I had a piece of white oak that I graciously volunteered to do it in.   The lady sort of stuck her nose in the air and said, "Oh, this is for a house in Indian Hill*, and the original is teak." 

 

"OK," I said.  I went to see Steve and he graciously cut off a 2' section that was the right width for me and charged me the $20 for the piece.   There were probably six cuts I had to make, all at some angle or bevel and the right dimension that I had to replicate.  I think I  charged a total of $40 for the material, the trip to the store and the half-hour of shop time.

The lady was shocked that it was "so expensive."    (sigh)  Rich but cheap snob.

 

* Indian Hill is the most affluent part of town where most of the C-level execs at the big companies live, most in 5000+ sq.ft. mansions and 10+ acre estates.  I've since worked in a number of them that were some of the most expensive homes in the county.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great atricle thanks for me because white oak is both plentiful around here and fairly cheap I will also add then when quartersawn it is great looking.  Teak and Mahogony are too expensive.  Ipe not normally harvested responsibily.  Cedar light and good for outdoor furniture but it is soft so be careful.  Redwood also faily soft  and work well with split proof stainless steel nails.  But it is from out west so its cost is higher the WO.  

Edited by Michael Thuman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Purple Heart is also a good outdoor wood.

 

Purpleheart is a colorful South American hardwood. It's used for both exterior and interior projects. Purpleheart is very durable against rot and decay in an outdoor environment.

The purple color does turn to more of mahogany brown color, due to its sensitivity to UV light.

Janka Hardness: 1850

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, HandyDan said:

Purple Heart is also a good outdoor wood.

 

Purpleheart is a colorful South American hardwood. It's used for both exterior and interior projects. Purpleheart is very durable against rot and decay in an outdoor environment.

The purple color does turn to more of mahogany brown color, due to its sensitivity to UV light.

Janka Hardness: 1850

Is it certified to be responsible harvest?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Michael Thuman said:

Is it certified to be responsible harvest?

 

Our military used it for their equipment trailers.  I am not sure if they still do but I would assume they would have researched the responsible harvest scenario.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Michael Thuman said:

Is it certified to be responsible harvest?

Don't know but I get chunks of it every now and then from buddies overseas.  They are used as blocking in shipping containers between pallets.  

 

It's free, I'll take it!!  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...