Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Will

Electrolysis rust removal

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Hi Will, I use the electrolysis method for cleaning up my "Old Delta Machines"

 

It sure is a work saver.

 

Here's a couple of before/after shots of a Drill Press head casting.

 

 

ning-dp4001-281-49.jpg?width=721

 

 

This head took a bit longer than normal to clean as I suspect it came out of a metal working shop.

 

 

ning-20hours2-281-3.jpg?width=721

 

 

It took about 20 hours in "The Tank" to get it that clean.

I'm using a 25 Amp charger from one of those battery back up sump pumps, with a car battery in the circuit.

The charger was a freebie from my neighbor, and makes a big difference compared to my old 6 Amp charger.

 

 

ning-thecharger-281-82.jpg?width=721

 

 

ning-thetank-281-48.jpg?width=721

 

 

That is my small parts cleaning tank.

The same neighbor just gave me a big orange plastic laundry cart on wheels which will probably fit a complete Uni-Saw.

 

Larry

 

 

ning-oldmansmiley-281-58.gifOld Woodworking Machinery Forum Host

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great tip Larry!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used it on several different tools, and it worked great! I also have a sandblast cabinet, and it has done well also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, oldwoodie said:

I've used it on several different tools, and it worked great! I also have a sandblast cabinet, and it has done well also.

I am wondering what is the best amperage to use. I have a couple of battery chargers that charge 15 amp max, and have a 50 amp. booster. I would hesitate to use the 50 amp. for any long term usage. 

What are your thoughts on this?

 

Herb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd go with the 15 amps.  I know the old transformer based chargers are recommended for use.  Not sure if new electronic chargers will work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I done a project using this method a few years ago.  Seems like I used the trickle charge setting.  If it makes any difference I was cleaning up sheet metal, several old rusty tool boxes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Will...for small tools like planes, squares etc. I've been using Evap-O-Rust. A little pricey, but lasts a long time if you keep the deposits poured off. However, if you're looking to completely remove the paint (or japanning on planes), Evap-O-Rust does not do that. It is non-toxic and environmentally "green." If only wiped off and allowed to dry it also will leave a protective coat on the metal minimizing rust for ~6 mo.

 

Electrolysis cleaned parts are very susceptible to flash rust if not treated or painted almost immediately. Another alternative is plain 'ole white vinegar. Just don't leave the cast iron/steel parts in it for months on end. Don't ask me how I know this.:rolleyes: My $.02.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Grandpadave52 said:

@Will...for small tools like planes, squares etc. I've been using Evap-O-Rust. A little pricey, but lasts a long time if you keep the deposits poured off. However, if you're looking to completely remove the paint (or japanning on planes), Evap-O-Rust does not do that. It is non-toxic and environmentally "green." If only wiped off and allowed to dry it also will leave a protective coat on the metal minimizing rust for ~6 mo.

 

Electrolysis cleaned parts are very susceptible to flash rust if not treated or painted almost immediately. Another alternative is plain 'ole white vinegar. Just don't leave the cast iron/steel parts in it for months on end. Don't ask me how I know this.:rolleyes: My $.02.

I use apple cider vinegar and if you leave it too long eats the metal too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Gerald said:

I use apple cider vinegar and if you leave it too long eats the metal too.

Yes it does...I had some small cast iron parts that just disappeared:blush:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Who We Are

Operation Ward 57 Challenge Coin Display Project

We are a woodworking community with an emphasis on sharing and learning the skilled craft of woodworking and all of its related disciplines. Our community is open to everyone who wishes to join us. We support our American veterans and active duty, being a veteran is not a prerequisite to join. Join us now!

Objective

Air Force Command Center Plaque

Of course just like most online woodworking communities we are centralized in the arts, crafts, and trades that are woodworking. But, we have another focus in our Patriot Woodworker community, we are the only woodworking community that was founded on our care and concern for our disabled veterans.

Volunteer

Patriot Woodworker Volunteers

The Patriot Woodworkers are an all volunteer community, from the staff and hosts who run our online woodworking community to the members who frequent our forums, you'll find volunteers in all of us. We are not on a payroll, unless you consider the spiritual rewards gained from volunteering, as compensation.

Education

Logging

One of the many projects we are working on is a wiki for our online community. A wiki is a great way for woodworkers and enthusiasts to share their knowledge to others, and to impart their knowledge for others to learn from, and utilize as well for their own benefit. We hope you'll consider being a wiki contributor.

×