Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
difalkner

Some interesting trivets

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

All are very nice David. I really like the creative solution you incorporated in the B1-B7 versions. Those are cool. Wonder what the significance is for the numbering?

 

Looking forward to seeing the video. Thanks for sharing your talent & creativity here with us too.:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Dave!  The guy who ordered them said his wife has 6 sisters and all names start with 'B'.  Their dad nicknamed them B1 through B7 according to birth years.  I guess it worked for them. :D

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, difalkner said:

Their dad nicknamed them B1 through B7 according to birth years.  I guess it worked for them. :D

Now that's funny but a cool heritage and story for them to forever share.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the video for making these trivets -

 

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks!  I'd love to tell you I've never had the two touch but if you look at the end of the nozzle you'll see that would be a hard sale... :o

 

Davd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coming from a manufacturing background where dozens of NC & CNC specialty machining centers were used, I shouldn't really be amazed watching the video.

 

However, I was amazed and entranced just the same. I didn't realize the machine would re-zero itself after tool changeover. Do you need to use any type of tool setting jig ensuring the bit settings in the collet is consistent? How many collets do you maintain?

 

While not steel or aluminum, I too was amazed at the bit/collet temperatures since obviously no coolant fluid is used. Your description of 125 in/min as slow(er) seemed to be a pretty quick feed-rate to me particularly in walnut. I can't imagine it going faster. But hey, the only thing I can compare to is shoving a router by hand or the material across a bit in a table setting and I'm no where that fast at least where you could recognize anything after.:lol:

 

As always, well done video David. I truly appreciate your sharing your work, talents and learning aids on TPW. Thoroughly enjoyed watching this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Dave!!  To be clear, I don't have an ATC (Automatic Tool Changer) so the bit changes are manual and I have to set zero each time.  Bit and collet changes take about 30 seconds and setting zero takes another 30 seconds so the time for bit changes is low.

 

I have cut Walnut at 200 ipm a few times but usually cut at 175 ipm.  These trivets represent such a small area that going much faster than 125 ipm is pointless and actually causes the CNC to jerk around quite a bit with the higher speeds and I don't think it cuts any faster.  It is typically cutting less than 2" before picking up and getting a new bite so it may not even be reaching 125 ipm even though Mach4 is reporting back to me that it does hit that occasionally.  Now on the perimeter cuts and full depth clean-up cuts it definitely reaches 125 ipm.

 

And I am in agreement on the speed vs. me trying to do it by hand - it seems awfully fast relative to how I use my plunge router and router table.  I just don't get anywhere near that speed when I cut by hand.

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks David...I love watching and learning more about the CNC approach to WW'ing. Probably will never own one at this stage nor can not currently justify ownership but enjoy trying to keep up with what's changing in this arena. So many advantages over traditional methods for jigs as well as replicating items for resale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Who We Are

Operation Ward 57 Challenge Coin Display Project

We are a woodworking community with an emphasis on sharing and learning the skilled craft of woodworking and all of its related disciplines. Our community is open to everyone who wishes to join us. We support our American veterans and active duty, being a veteran is not a prerequisite to join. Join us now!

Objective

Air Force Command Center Plaque

Of course just like most online woodworking communities we are centralized in the arts, crafts, and trades that are woodworking. But, we have another focus in our Patriot Woodworker community, we are the only woodworking community that was founded on our care and concern for our disabled veterans.

Volunteer

Patriot Woodworker Volunteers

The Patriot Woodworkers are an all volunteer community, from the staff and hosts who run our online woodworking community to the members who frequent our forums, you'll find volunteers in all of us. We are not on a payroll, unless you consider the spiritual rewards gained from volunteering, as compensation.

Education

Logging

One of the many projects we are working on is a wiki for our online community. A wiki is a great way for woodworkers and enthusiasts to share their knowledge to others, and to impart their knowledge for others to learn from, and utilize as well for their own benefit. We hope you'll consider being a wiki contributor.

×