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hawkeye10

Help please.

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I bought a step drive (I think that is the name) and I can't turn without it catching. It is stopping when it shouldn't. How much pressure can I put on the headstock with the tailstock? My lathe is an old spindle lathe with a 1/2 HP motor. I was practicing turning a small leg (8.5") and getting nowhere.  Oh yes, I was turning pine. 

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Hawkeye,

Are you talking about a step pulley drive?

Is the belt slipping when it stops turning?

If not your motor might be weak.

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Might be the motor is wired for 220 Volts, and you're trying to run it on 120 Volts.

It wouldn't be the first time I've seen that.

It would seem like it develops full power but, stalls when you put a load on it.

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I feel you are talking about a "Steb Center".  It is meant to do what you say it is doing if you get a catch.  It should let the turned piece to stop rather than give you the jolt a catch usually renders.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Larry Buskirk said:

Might be the motor is wired for 220 Volts, and you're trying to run it on 120 Volts.

It wouldn't be the first time I've seen that.

It would seem like it develops full power but, stalls when you put a load on it.

Larry I will check that out today even tho I don't think it's wired for 220 but you never know.

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8 hours ago, HandyDan said:

I feel you are talking about a "Steb Center".  It is meant to do what you say it is doing if you get a catch.  It should let the turned piece to stop rather than give you the jolt a catch usually renders.

 

 

Thanks, Dan, I was thinking it was pronounced "step" when it really is "steb".

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3 minutes ago, hawkeye10 said:

Thanks, Dan, I was thinking it was pronounced "step" when it really is "steb".

 

I forgot to say they don't work well in pine.  Too soft.

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3 hours ago, HandyDan said:

 

I forgot to say they don't work well in pine.  Too soft.

I found that to be true about pine. I had a piece of hedge apple and put that in there so I am doing better now. I also found my tailstock is moving toward the rear when I tighten it up on what I am turning. Am I putting to much pressure on it? I took it off and adjusted the two nuts on the bottom but that didn't do anything. I tried to move it with my hands and could not. I really tried hard. 

 

PS ; Did you know those drive centers are sharp?  :BugEyeSmiley:

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15 hours ago, Larry Buskirk said:

Might be the motor is wired for 220 Volts, and you're trying to run it on 120 Volts.

It wouldn't be the first time I've seen that.

It would seem like it develops full power but, stalls when you put a load on it.

Larry, it's a 115 volt only motor. It can be wired to run in reverse so I might look into that later. It would be nice for sanding.

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1 hour ago, hawkeye10 said:

Am I putting to much pressure on it?

 

You need to hold the wood tight enough to the steb center for the teeth to bite into the wood.  Remove the tail stock and check the bottom.  Make sure it is clean.  Sometimes wood dust can build up and get fused to the metal.  Also check the clamp piece under the ways.  If it is bent replace it.  It needs to hold tight too.  

 

1 hour ago, hawkeye10 said:

I took it off and adjusted the two nuts on the bottom but that didn't do anything.

 

It is possible those nuts are too tight and the lever mechanism isn't staying tight.  From loose to tight the handle should move as close to 45° as possible without going over center.  If it goes over center you will know it because the handle will get loose again. 

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4 hours ago, HandyDan said:

 

You need to hold the wood tight enough to the steb center for the teeth to bite into the wood.  Remove the tail stock and check the bottom.  Make sure it is clean.  Sometimes wood dust can build up and get fused to the metal.  Also check the clamp piece under the ways.  If it is bent replace it.  It needs to hold tight too.  

 

 

It is possible those nuts are too tight and the lever mechanism isn't staying tight.  From loose to tight the handle should move as close to 45° as possible without going over center.  If it goes over center you will know it because the handle will get loose again. 

Thanks, Dan. I know the clamp is clean because I cleaned it when I first got the lathe. I will post about the rest of your suggestions in the mourning. 

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I had the same trouble with my Delta lathe. The tailstock would slide on the ways when I applied pressure.

 

I found that I couldn't get enough torque on the short lever used to tighten the tailstock down. I made an extension handle that slips over the original handle. It makes the total length about twice the original. Much easier to operate and provides more torque/pressure.

 

IMG_6356.thumb.jpg.1da2ba8160d148924c0990abc484608f.jpg

 

I split the lower inch or so of the hollowed handle and used a hose clamp to secure it to the original handle.

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