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thanks Cal for the write up..

well worth the read...

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better than a great rehab too..

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Great tutorial and even greater saves Cal.

I may have to pay closer attention at some yard/garage sales now.

Thanks for the thread.

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Two thumbs up Cal. :TwoThumbsUp:

Those tool boxes came out real nice! :D

Thanks for posting your experience using the process.

 

I've noticed when I do the electrolysis process it helps to scrub, & rinse both the part being cleaned, & the sacrificial anode plates when I notice the process slowing down, this occurs about every 4-6 Hrs.  

 

I've acquired a couple of my old machines in pretty much the same manner as you received your tool boxes.

The previous owners did not think they could be saved, and were going to throw them out for the "Scrappers".

When one of them saw what I had done with his contribution to my cause his reaction is best described as :BugEyeSmiley: followed by :WonderScratch: and some comments I can't post here. :rolleyes:

 

He simply couldn't believe it was the same machine, that one had several coats of paint but was stripped clean in about 2 days. It might be the difference between my using Washing Soda, larger anode plates, plus the fact that I do what I stated above. I've never tried using Baking Soda for the electrolyte solution.

 

A couple of times I've reached into my tank forgetting to disconnect the power and could feel the current flow much like the sensation of testing a 9 Volt battery with your tongue!

Admit it, I'm sure some of you guys tested your transistor radio batteries that way when you were younger. ;)

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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 Those came out looking better than new. Thanks for the lesson.

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12 hours ago, Larry Buskirk said:

A couple of times I've reached into my tank forgetting to disconnect the power and could feel the current flow much like the sensation of testing a 9 Volt battery with your tongue!

Admit it, I'm sure some of you guys tested your transistor radio batteries that way when you were younger.

My older brother was a radio operator in the Army ('Nam Vet).  He showed me this technique when he got home as how they tested them in the field.  I still do it when I question my 9v batteries - which isn't very often any more...

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Thanks, Cal. Great info, and a nice restoration. Those look like new!

John

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