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Michael Thuman

basement shop noise supression

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I have my shop in my dry (most of the time) basement.  What have others done to stop noise traveling up into the living quarters and keeping dust out?

 

I have a good dust collection system venting indoors. 

I think a door sweep on the basement door would be a great idea.

I think keeping shop clothes in the shop and clothes also would be great idea.

Should I put insulation in the celing then drywall it up?

If so what type of insulation?

If not do I just use drywall (where possible)? 

 

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According to Mimi, dust is the biggest problem. We have forced hot air. Really difficult to keep the dust contained. A/C and heat both pick up some of the basement air and recirculate the dust. Replacing furnace filters often is a must. Our house was built in the early fifties. Air handling wasn't a priority in those days.

 

My loudest machine is the planer. I try to run it when no one is home. The air compressor is right up there, too.

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We tried stapling those pressed paper egg cartons in a bedroom wall. Seemed to work. But, since it was new construction, we had no base line. Couldn't hear the tv in the adjacent room, though. 

Edited by Gene Howe

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I don't have a basement shop, but I built a soundproof room for my Dust Collector and compressor. I used 3 1/2" thick rockwool sound bats between the studs and then stapled HF moving blankets onto the face of the studs. When I walk thru that room to get to the shop, I can feel the deadness of the sound, and when my Dust ciollector is running I can have a normal conversation.

Those moving blankets are cheap, around $6-$9 ea. and easy to install. I got the idea from my SIL who has a band that likes to practice in his garage. He did that and you can hardly hear his practice going on inside the house.

Herb

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Sealing the cold air returns is most important to keep the dust migration down.  Where the duct is a piece of tin spanning two joists the tin needs sealed to the joists and the joists to the floor underlay needs to be sealed too.  Insulating the joists and drywall on the ceiling would be a big advantage.  Remember, dust can and will be sucked through the tiniest of spaces.  Close enough isn't for dust containment.

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Thanks all the ducts are sealed up tight and it is from me tracking stuff up stiars.  Not much dust.

For insulation the upstairs is warmer than down so does the vapor barrier side of the insulation do up againest the sub floor or is it stapled to the bottom of the floor joists?

 

I like the blanket idea and will give that a try for my loudest components.  

Stick do they make anythign for ceilling cavities I only saw wall cavities.

 

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47 minutes ago, Michael Thuman said:

Stick do they make anythign for ceilling cavities

yup..

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The best sound barrier is lead foil.

In commercial construction we used to use it on the super sound proofing attorneys office conference rooms.

https://www.radiationproducts.com/acoustical-board.htm

 

 

An alternative material which is cheaper is MLV.

 

https://www.soundaway.com/mass-loaded-vinyl-noise-barrier-s/31.htm

 

Herb

Edited by Dadio

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@Dadio

The best sound barrier is lead foil.

In commercial construction we used to use it on the super sound proofing attorneys office conference rooms.

 

I had heard years ago that they used lead between two layers of drywall in the meeting rooms in the building i worked in the last 40+ years, but never saw one of the walls deconstructed to know.   They also used steel studs.

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1 hour ago, p_toad said:

@Dadio

The best sound barrier is lead foil.

In commercial construction we used to use it on the super sound proofing attorneys office conference rooms.

 

I had heard years ago that they used lead between two layers of drywall in the meeting rooms in the building i worked in the last 40+ years, but never saw one of the walls deconstructed to know.   They also used steel studs.

And 2 stud walls 1" apart.

Herb

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27 minutes ago, Dadio said:

And 2 stud walls 1" apart.

Herb

w/ insulation..

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As a follow up the noise from shop upstairs is actually not that noticeable.  So I think fiberglass for 2x10's then double layer of 1/2" with access ports for all water, electrical, gas.  

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Noise control 101:  you have to think in terms of pathways.  The obvious path is from noise to wall to ear.  In that path, you first make sure there are no holes in the wall.  Second consideration is mass:  you want to stop noise, put something heavy in the way (drywall, including double layers, offset, mud, taped).  In some cases of high noise source (jet engine!), double stud wall:  a stud with gyp on both sides will transmit noise by vibrating the stud, so you put in offset studs, one set for inner gyp (noise side), other set for outer gyp (ear side).  Insulation in the cavity does nothing (not enough mass) (insulation goes somewhere else).  Double stud walls are only 1/2" thicker than std walls; just make sure the studs don't touch!  Again, as noise source is high, standard stud spacing allows the gyp to "drum", and the vibrations travel through the air in the wall (and any insulation), causing the ear side gyp to vibrate, and that allows sound to the ear; solution is shortening stud spacing (less "drum" surface). 

 

Second pathway is reflected noise.  Most important wall for reflection is the one opposite the "ear" wall.  On this wall, you put the insulation, or eggcrate, or any other irregular surface.  These all reduce the reflectance of noise.  Walls and ceilings on either side of the opposite wall reflection will also reflect noise, but only about half as much. 

 

If you have the time to try these, you can just keep adding precautions until the ear is happy.  There are calculation methods to determine transmission, reflection, attenuation; it takes a little investigation to learn these, but they are quite accurate once you learn them.  And, yes, there are computer programs that do the calculations.  It really helps if you understand the principles first, of course.

 

And a block wall, plastered and painted (plaster and paint close tiny holes), will stop jet engine noise (135 dbA).

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