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Ol Buck

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I mig welded the edge back on a set of high lift blades for a lawn tractor that could not be purchased any longer.  The edge was harder but also chipped easier.  I buy new blades through a friend of mine that is a Stens dealer.  The blades from them are thicker and harder than the manufacturers.

 

   https://www.stens.com/

 

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I would highly recommend against it Buck. It would take some very specialized equipment to control HT along the edge...get it over hardened and it could become brittle and possibly fracture..last thing you want is a chunk of steel coming out the discharge chute or up through the deck at 100 mph. At minimum, as Dan noted, the edge is going to chip much easier.

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3 hours ago, HandyDan said:

I buy new blades through a friend of mine that is a Stens dealer.  The blades from them are thicker and harder than the manufacturers.

Good company with high quality, right fit after-market parts at fair prices. 

I've been using Oregon Gator blades on my JD's. Like the Sten's, thicker, harder, wider, with much more sharpening area than OEM's and quite a bit less $$'s

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I do think some blades are treated steel. I have a Zero turn mower made in Kansas called a Hustler.

They claim to be the very first maker of that type of mower.. All their metal like what the mower decks are made of are thicker than the cheaper riding mowers.. I do get longer use out of their blades before they need to be sharpened. One sharpening is about all I can do before the mower starts shaking  from me getting the blades out of balance.

   I use mulching blades and my deck does not have a chute on the side of the deck  and it keeps the grass in and mulches it really fine and redistributes it on the yard....I would recommend this kind of set up with a riding mower... It keeps the lawn looking better also with a lot less labor involved. Just google blades and read up on them..also if interested google Hustler Mowers. They are in Kansas

   All the undercarriage on the Hustler is  two or three times thicker so won't wear out so fast and more stronger than a regular riding mower and I use to go through mowers real quick mowing the four acres at the go cart track and golf course so my experience grew by leaps and bounds keep equipment running and in good shape..

   And yes I think some of the blades are heat treated to hold an edge longer.

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Dan, You might think about having someone TIG weld the cutting edges with a nickle wire.

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6 hours ago, It Was Al B said:

Dan, You might think about having someone TIG weld the cutting edges with a nickle wire.

 

The edge isn't that important to me.  The high lift blades are good for sucking leaves in the fall.

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