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We having our kitchen remodeled. The current setup has an electric  Jenn air range with downdraft vent, and in all honesty it works quite well. But we want a gas cooktop, and we'll also have an electric wall oven installed in the new kitchen. Because the cooktop will be on an island, it would have to be a downdraft model, or we would need an overhead range hood installed. I'd like to avoid the overhead hood, since having it hanging in the middle of our smallish kitchen would block the openess we now have, plus it's fairly expensive. That leaves us with a choice of a downdraft cooktop, or an unvented one with no other venting. The 36" downdraft cooktops I've found all really look like crap, at least in the photos I see. The vent is in the center portion of the range with one burner on the right and 4 burners on the left. The unvented ones are much nicer looking with the burners arranged symmetrically.  Here's my question: how bad is it to have a gas range in a kitchen that doesn't have an exhaust vent? Are there CO problems, or steam, or heat that are any different than an unvented electric range would have?

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Lew, it's LP...does that make a difference? Gene, thanks...glad to get a first hand observation.

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1 minute ago, Fred W. Hargis Jr said:

Lew, it's LP...does that make a difference? Gene, thanks...glad to get a first hand observation.

Yes, LP produces CO2 and water neither is hazardous in that quantity. Natural gas produces CO which is toxic.

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Fred, when I built my house in LA I had an island cooktop. Built into the cabinet was a retractable downdraft vent that raised and lowered as needed. Sort of like a flatscreen TV that raises and lowers into the cabinet. It worked extremely well. The only downside was that I lost some of the storage directly underneath the cooktop to the blower motor, and the Stainless Steel models can be a little pricey.

 

Do a search on DuckDuckGo for Downdraft Retractable Vents and you will find all kinds of examples.

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 I have not heard of any CO problems from a gas range unless they were used to heat a home.    I would not think they could sell them without exhaust to the outside if it were a big problem.   As said LP burns cleaner which is why a lot of fork lifts inside warehouses are LP.    Roly

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Also Ron, it does not have to be a low overhead vent system. At this point with the design you have going, you should only be concerned with moving unwanted air out, that may stay in, for example seafood, or other aromas that are excellent around dinner time, but not so pleasant hours after or the next day.

So with that being said, use an anti grease splatter if you don't already when frying, we do, and they work great!

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Now to move the air while cooking, if you are able to place a small vent hole with a fan directly above the cooking area in the ceiling, I'd say go for it. And you could do it quite handsomely if we get creative (creativity is your middle name Ron) you can even make it look really cool. How about a small tiled area applied directly to your ceiling around the small fan, how about something made from wood? How about some recessed lighting above the cooking area, but one of the lights will actually be a small fan. Remember, we are not concerned with filtering out grease in the air etc, you got that covered pretty good with the splatter guard. But what you can draw out is the unwanted aromas, and steam.

Just doing a little research I also found a flush mount range hood as well, now that's pretty danged cool.

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Broan ceiling mount ventilator, $236

4YG82_AS01?$mdmain$

 

 

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I replaced an island jean-air downdraft electric cooktop with a jean-air gas cooktop a few years ago. I used the same downdraft ducting. The gas model had 2 burners on each side of the vent opening, just like my electric version.This their current model.

 image.png.7e3d72b04536f749e4a35d76e107516b.png

 

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There are a lot of things my wife cooks where the vent is really helpful.  Good eating but smells terrible and if folks are spending the night with you a vent would be nice.... LP gas also smells bad... Lots of reasons we have used electricity for everything since we been married..

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Gave Phyl the option when we built. She chose a gas (propane) range. We do have electric lights, though.:D

Edited by Gene Howe

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We recently changed to electric, but before that we had LP gas and it caused no problems without venting outside.

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Thanks for all the replies. I did find that Broan downdraft mentioned and I intend to ask the contractor of that's an option for us. But it sounds like using the gas itself without venting is not a problem, though the smoke and odor might be.

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You might consider a bathroom ceiling vent, which is probably what the Broan is often used for. I have a Panasonic unit in my bathroom, similar to the broan but it includes lighting.

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I would vote for at least a ceiling fan, if you even boil water there will be condensation on the windows. The combustion makes water vapor and cooking adds to that, plus some foods like fish and broccoli can create lingering odors.

Herb

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Al, the Broan I referred to is actually a pop up vent that's installed in the counter behind the cooktop...the unit itself is about $600, pluds whatever the install would require. But we are leaning toward the downdraft cooktop, I hate the way they look but it may be the best all around option.

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Fred, the Broan I was referring to was the one that John had pictured. Probably not a choice unless the home is only one story. It vents thru the roof.

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On 5/12/2018 at 7:44 PM, Gene Howe said:

We do have electric lights, though.:D

REALLY??? All the way out there on the mesa? I thought you'd still be using kerosene lamps. :lol:

John

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6 minutes ago, HARO50 said:

REALLY??? All the way out there on the mesa? I thought you'd still be using kerosene lamps. :lol:

John

We keep them in reserve. Got one in the little house behind the house for reading the Sears catalog before deciding which pages to tear out.;)

 

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