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John Morris

George Nakashima Bench (For Sale) Incredible

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$18,000 or best offer, it's yours. Personally if I had 15 to 18 grand of disposable income, I'd pick it up in a heartbeat. I love Nakashima designs and the history that surrounds the name.

These don't come around too often. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Early-Free-Edge-Walnut-Bench-by-American-Woodworker-George-Nakashima/172438177859?hash=item28261dc843:g:9OsAAOSwEzxYSdXK

Nakashima Bench.jpg

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If that is your honest thoughts, then you are out of your mind.   What would you do if you owned it, brag to some one you own it????

   You might stop at one of those old junk stores. Sometime they have these old benches folks use to sit on in front of the old drug stores and whittle and shoot the bull... 25 bucks or so and you got one close enough where I would not be able to tell the difference as to who made it..........might have to tighten it up some with a little glue but hey

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20 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

If that is your honest thoughts, then you are out of your mind.   What would you do if you owned it, brag to some one you own it????

   You might stop at one of those old junk stores. Sometime they have these old benches folks use to sit on in front of the old drug stores and whittle and shoot the bull... 25 bucks or so and you got one close enough where I would not be able to tell the difference as to who made it..........might have to tighten it up some with a little glue but hey

TELL IT LIKE IT IS JESS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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1 hour ago, Smallpatch said:

What would you do if you owned it, brag to some one you own it????

I'm not a braggart, not my style. I would own it, appreciate it, I would understand the historical significance of the piece in the realm of the arts and crafts genre, I would sit on it, and I would show case it in my home, I would purchase it as in investment as Nakashima pieces grow in value, they do not depreciate, I would tell those who are interested in the history of George Nakashima that the piece they are sitting on, was made by the Father of the American Crafts Movement, I may also launch into the history of Mr. Nakashima's internment in our WWII concentration camps as many Japanese Americans were, and that Mr. Nakashima was separated from his work because of his internment, but he found an inspirational Japanese woodworker in the camp and he learned from this artist and it helped him form his artistry in wood that we know of today. The history surrounding this man, who made that bench is an American story, the bench is half the value, the man who made it is the other half.

In other words, I would love to have it, if I was a millionaire. But I aint, and I won't. Not when I got college and kids to pay for, and a new car for the wife! For now though, I can enjoy the thought, so how about lettin me have this one, ok Jess?:)

 

If anyone here appreciates the man, the furniture, like I do, here is a cool site full of Nakashima:

https://www.1stdibs.com/creators/george-nakashima/furniture/

 

You can also learn a little more about the man at this wiki page I created, it's not finished yet, but as wiki's are, it's a work in progress.

http://thepatriotwoodwiki.org/George-Nakashima

 

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4 minutes ago, Dadio said:

Not going there,there is no there over there.

Herb

By saying your not going there Herb, you already did!:lol:

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22 minutes ago, John Morris said:

By saying your not going there Herb, you already did!:lol:

 

Herber is just worried he couldn't get back...

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John being honest I have no idea what it looks like under the board called the seat...... but it looks like we made things like this in the 9th grade wood working class in high school, basic basic.  I can see a plain ole tapered leg but my goodness there is nothing extra ordinary about this piece....and since I have never heard the name of the builder before your mentioned him....  and for sure I don't think that thing would last a week in a house containing plain ole ordinary kids..... but it is your 18,000 so by all means go ahead..  I use to see adds like this back when we subscribed to the wall street journal and wife and I would joke about wonder what nut would pay for things like this. This is one of the clocks from the wall street journal adds.

 

1885552282_5405273_l62413_30.jpg.789e23449c633538a18b805cc7e9faf7.jpg

  the price on it was 62,413.30     Its funny for my wealth or lack of it never got me interested in unreasonable prices.

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21 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

and since I have never heard the name of the builder before your mentioned him

I understand then were you are coming from, thanks for the clarification.

 

Edit: You know, some folks will pay a million for a bucket of bolts that looks like an old Ford Cobra on blocks, just because all the parts match from the factory, it's all in what we like, and what we appreciate. I love furniture with history, it's my thing.

 

Sure, many of us here could make that Nakashima bench, but it would be just a knock off, not an original thought, not a concept dreamed up by any of us, but a copy. I used to make sculpted rockers, the few that I made I sold between $3500.00 and $4000.00. Some would say, you have to be kidding, no, it's not a joke, it's an appreciation for the work and the craftsman or woman who made it. Many told me I was selling to low.

 

Nakashima made his furniture from the felling of the tree, splitting of the logs, to the shaping of the wood, you don't learn that in a high school wood shop. Each component of his work is meticulously hand made, shaped by shave, knife, pull saw, maul, splitter, etc etc. Then you pile on the fact that his furniture is not being made any longer due to his death, and now you have a limited supply of original Nakashima works, then you put into that story and the historical significance of this American Icon in woodworking, well, you have a value, what that value is, is the market, and the folks who love to purchase Nakashima.

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14 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

This is one of the clocks from the wall street journal adds.

 

that is one seriously ugly clock...

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1 hour ago, Smallpatch said:

If that is your honest thoughts, then you are out of your mind.   What would you do if you owned it, brag to some one you own it????

   You might stop at one of those old junk stores. Sometime they have these old benches folks use to sit on in front of the old drug stores and whittle and shoot the bull... 25 bucks or so and you got one close enough where I would not be able to tell the difference as to who made it..........might have to tighten it up some with a little glue but hey

 

I think John is saying he would choose this piece if he had the money to afford fine art.  Same as people buy Picasso works.

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7 minutes ago, HandyDan said:

I think John is saying he would choose this piece if he had the money to afford fine art.  Same as people buy Picasso works.

So you read the topic Dan! Thanks!:lol:

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1 hour ago, John Morris said:

I understand then were you are coming from, thanks for the clarification.

 

Edit: You know, some folks will pay a million for a bucket of bolts that looks like an old Ford Cobra on blocks, just because all the parts match from the factory, it's all in what we like, and what we appreciate. I love furniture with history, it's my thing.

 

Sure, many of us here could make that Nakashima bench, but it would be just a knock off, not an original thought, not a concept dreamed up by any of us, but a copy. I used to make sculpted rockers, the few that I made I sold between $3500.00 and $4000.00. Some would say, you have to be kidding, no, it's not a joke, it's an appreciation for the work and the craftsman or woman who made it. Many told me I was selling to low.

 

Nakashima made his furniture from the felling of the tree, splitting of the logs, to the shaping of the wood, you don't learn that in a high school wood shop. Each component of his work is meticulously hand made, shaped by shave, knife, pull saw, maul, splitter, etc etc. Then you pile on the fact that his furniture is not being made any longer due to his death, and now you have a limited supply of original Nakashima works, then you put into that story and the historical significance of this American Icon in woodworking, well, you have a value, what that value is, is the market, and the folks who love to purchase Nakashima.

Ah contra-ire John , his daughter continued his work. And by the way 18 may be low look at this one on Antiques Roadshow APPRAISAL

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I have touched and sat in a Sam Malloof rocking chair that he had personally made. I have also sat in a hand made John Morris rocking chair in his home. I can relate to John's personal emotions about it.

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It wouldn't be like spending a lot for something that will depreciate in value over the years . It might actually appreciate in value over time. For anyone with the free cash, Why not ?

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1 hour ago, Gerald said:

Ah contra-ire John , his daughter continued his work.

Completely aware of that Gerald!:cowboy:

But the pieces that come out of Nakashima's shop today, while they are still beautiful as ever, and designed and in some cases built by his daughter, they are not George pieces, there is a difference. That's not to take away from his daughter Mira, but the fact is, the pieces designed and built by or under George Nakashima carry much more weight and value.

 

By the way, that is a beautiful Conoid in that video. Absolutely gorgeous. Thanks for digging that one up Gerald.

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John, I have seen you jump in and defend someone who was taking heat for a comment they made, which was not intended to offend or incite, but was just a statement of personal opinion.  Don't let the "Curmudgeon Cavalry" get you down.

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2 hours ago, PostalTom said:

John, I have seen you jump in and defend someone who was taking heat for a comment they made, which was not intended to offend or incite, but was just a statement of personal opinion.  Don't let the "Curmudgeon Cavalry" get you down.

Tom, nothing in this topic is offensive at all, full of opinions yes, but we all got em. I completely get it, the apprehension to place such a high value on something that appears like we could all build our selves. As woodworkers we are a thrifty bunch, why buy it if you can build it! I am unscathed here, as I hope all are, if anything, I got to introduce George Nakashima to some folks who may not of known who he was in the first place, and that's a good thing.

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