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Drilling it Down Part Deux

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Enter the era of plastic tools and plastic cars. :wacko:

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10 hours ago, It Was Al B said:

Enter the era of plastic tools and plastic cars. :wacko:

Blame GM. The Corvettes started it.:) 

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For some reason, I am thinking England started using plastic before GM did.

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I have a 9" floor model tv that is a form of plastic my folks bought in 1947. It was one of the larger screens at the time. Its close to 1/2" thick, Admiral brand. Seems like the tv's first came out in the us???

  Wrestling, roller derby, Hopalong Cassidy,  and Roy Rodgers and lot of test patterns during the day. Before anyone had their own tv's ,  the furniture store would turn one on in the display window and folks would take their little stools and blankets and sit on the sidewalk and watch tv. But most of the time someone had to be able to turn the horizonal or  verticle knob one way or the other to keep the picture from rolling side to side or or up and up and up... So usually only the first few minutes was clear watchable tv  then nothing but a rolling screen till 10 when the tv's would sign off and show the test pattern for a while while guys would try to adjust their sets for the next days tv watching.. Funny for the test patterns were always clear and never rolled .....

.

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6 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

I have a 9" floor model tv that is a form of plastic my folks bought in 1947. It was one of the larger screens at the time. Its close to 1/2" thick, Admiral brand. Seems like the tv's first came out in the us???

  Wrestling, roller derby, Hopalong Cassidy,  and Roy Rodgers and lot of test patterns during the day. Before anyone had their own tv's ,  the furniture store would turn one on in the display window and folks would take their little stools and blankets and sit on the sidewalk and watch tv. But most of the time someone had to be able to turn the horizonal or  verticle knob one way or the other to keep the picture from rolling side to side or or up and up and up... So usually only the first few minutes was clear watchable tv  then nothing but a rolling screen till 10 when the tv's would sign off and show the test pattern for a while while guys would try to adjust their sets for the next days tv watching.. Funny for the test patterns were always clear and never rolled .....

.

Jesse...or anyone else... did you ever see one of those old TVs that looked like an old Victrola cabinet? When the lid was lifted, a mirror flipped into place and you saw a TV screen that was mounted in the cabinet, facing up. IIRC the picture was somehow magnified. I saw one maybe 40 years ago. Don't know the maker or year it was made. But, the cabinet was veneered plywood. Can't remember if the image in the mirror was reversed or not.

We didn't get a TV until 1959. Dad always said he wasn't gonna buy one until they had color. In our small town, the general store got its first color TV that year. 

 

 

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35 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

I have a 9" floor model tv that is a form of plastic my folks bought in 1947. It was one of the larger screens at the time. Its close to 1/2" thick, Admiral brand. Seems like the tv's first came out in the us???

  Wrestling, roller derby, Hopalong Cassidy,  and Roy Rodgers and lot of test patterns during the day. Before anyone had their own tv's ,  the furniture store would turn one on in the display window and folks would take their little stools and blankets and sit on the sidewalk and watch tv. But most of the time someone had to be able to turn the horizonal or  verticle knob one way or the other to keep the picture from rolling side to side or or up and up and up... So usually only the first few minutes was clear watchable tv  then nothing but a rolling screen till 10 when the tv's would sign off and show the test pattern for a while while guys would try to adjust their sets for the next days tv watching.. Funny for the test patterns were always clear and never rolled .....

.

I think they called that plastic, Bakelite.

We didn't get a TV til around 1955, My mother told my Dad he couldn't get one til he put a crapper in the house.

Herb

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Gene I do remember something of that nature but so long ago, no details..except it was a projected screen and was not too clear...and did seem like a GE Brand.

 

Lew, yes it was Bakelite and boy did it ever stink when being burned....Rotor caps and some rotors were bakelite on cars back then..I drove an MG for a few years and I kept a few extra rotors in the glove box..I could be going down the road and it was like someone turned off the ignition. I could coast to a stop have the hood up and the rotor replaced in a couple of minutes...It did take me a while the first time it happened..I could call my wife to come pull me in and don't forget an old tire and a few feet of nylon rope. This is what I tied between the pickup bumper and the MG bumper.. The old tire server as a shock absorber since one side was tied to the pickup and the other side was tied to the MG....Better than a toe truck!!!

   Too bad the bumpers have been removed from most vehicles now a days...

 


We had moved back to Texas in 1951 and no town around us had tv , then in 1953 Lubbock got a tv station. 

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7 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

Blame GM. The Corvettes started it.:) 

I believe the Vettes were made of fiberglass Gene. Couldn't flex like plastic does.

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When we moved to California in 1941 our shack in Texas didn't have anything. No electricity, running water or a sewer and the first little three room house in California had all three.. My mother thought she had died and gone to heaven.

   We had just gotten settled out there and the war started. Black curtains and air raid sirens going off often for we were 18 miles from the ocean and close to Lockeed and a few other plants and dad got a job welding ships together for they turned him down for the army.. Our school was a collection place for scrap metal so no sports for all the flat ground was piled with car bodies and metal...Don't you know how many old cars  would be running around if there had been no war...and not long after the war started, rubber tubes were replaced with synthetic rubber and that was bad for the kids who had sling shots...and the day the war ended the chevy house had a set of gas pumps and the price of gas was 20 cents a gallon and the first guy that morning came up on a motor cycle and said fill er up...and did not need a ration stamp, just the money..Only one gas station in Yorba Linda in 1945.

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47 minutes ago, It Was Al B said:

I believe the Vettes were made of fiberglass Gene. Couldn't flex like plastic does.

You be right, Al. 

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WE did not have a color TV till I got out of college. For a wedding gift my dad gave us a b&w tv.

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Finally had a color TV my Jr. year of HS..."new" step-mother had one she brought. 

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Just a reminder of drills..

:rolleyes: 

powerKraft.jpg.7b7871757b9ce2874d7e594afce01515.jpg

Power Kraft,  sold by Montgomery Wards....drill only, does not have a "Reverse" to it.   I might have to wrap the cord where it leaves the handle..

Has a unique smell when it use...used to call it  "the Ozone Smell" 

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10 hours ago, steven newman said:

Power Kraft,  sold by Montgomery Wards

Yep, have one of those MW (well 2 I think with the big boy)...one on the far right...Technically it's a Fairbanks-Wards. I'm guessing somewhere in the 40's????

image.png.aa2519c49190a50b803269df420c3d91.png

 

 

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