Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
p_toad

MWTCA February 2018 "What's It" Project

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, HARO50 said:

Got one of these in a Craftsman  screwdriver set back in the 70's. They called it a cotter pin tool.  Possibly one of the first "Multi-Purpose" tools? :unsure:

Mine's a Snap-on...looks just like this...Have another similar version I bought from AutoZone they call a radiator hose removal tool

image.png.9d5c6306400796da79df74a10cf0970b.png  image.png.0f085de145cf062cde237063231ceb1a.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those look an awful lot like the things they use on us at work, but i'm pretty sure the working end is a lot sharper and longer.  :(

 

By the way, does the end of this remind you of anything?

image.png.c9800f995708de957a7f987e0eff2281.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, p_toad said:

By the way, does the end of this remind you of anything?

Does it have batteries? Sorta' reminds me of a version of one of these; used it when moving cattle

 

image.png.d4191cb8513b144e556d3b93839f726f.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think further and the more I do it looks like a wax modeling tool or for a matter of fact they could be used on anything that can be sculptured including mixtures.

 

Preston

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2018 at 10:37 AM, John Morris said:

That's pretty compelling Bill, now the next step in verification? Perhaps contact the pros via email with this topic link in it, and ask them for their opinion? We always get a ton of great ideas with these MWTCA projects, but you guys never go the next step, verification! :D

So, at John's urging I reached out to several business that do caning, upholstery, weaving type work. I sent them the photo with a request for their opinion on the tools. Here is what I have, so far. I am still waiting on a couple of more replies and I had one request for better photographs of the tips from one of the professionals. John is attempting to obtain them for me/us.

 

Although not super compelling, I got, what I feel are positive replies as to the tools. Here is what I have gathered so far...

 

Dear Bill, It is possible, I would need to see a picture of each turned 1/4 turn to no more.  The tips of the tools are all I need to see.  All Best, Jeremy

The Caning Shoppe

99 Albion St. Studio 2

Somerville, MA     02144

(617) 776-0100

www.caningshoppe.com

------------

 

 

Hi Bill,

 

I don't recognize them,and can't really imagine how they would be used based on how I work, but it's possible. Seat weaving is something that everyone who does it, does a little differently than the others...so it may be that these tools were hand-made by someone for a specific task, such as seat weaving.

 

Karen

 

Karen Curcio <nh.chaircaner@gmail.com>

---------------

Hi William,

 

               These do look to be canning tools.

 

Thank You,

Adam Thomson

Classic Furniture

508-528-6747

adam@classic-furniture.com

-----------

I the interest of FULL disclosure. This professional doesn't think that they are caning tools, but may have been used for another type of seat weaving operation(s).

 

Bill,

After looking at your attachment photo of tools, I do not know exactly what they are!!?!

I feel certain they are not tools used in hand caning....the only tool besides a small tapered awl; a side cutter; and wooden pegs could be a caning needle.  A caning needle has a long fine shaft (similar to a  "0" knitting needle) but with a slotted flat head so cane can be pulled, after the needle is inserted between other strands, to weave in steps 4, 5, and 6.

 

In weaving a porch rocker, these tools might?? have been used to align the ash splints; flat reeds; or half round reeds instead of using one's fingers...

 

Sorry I was not able to identify your tools....let me know if you find verification of what they are...

 

Dennis

mainecaning.com

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen the top one, or variants of it.  Just cannot place where I seen it.

These tools may have been cleaned up, but they do not look abused such as would be the case if they were in any type of mechanical environment.  No scratches/dents/dings on the handles.  I think might be something to do with a looming type of use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 11:49 AM, steven newman said:

One other thought..

 

When spinning a thin metal plate onto a form on the lathe.....

I don't think it is for metal spinning as those tools arte usually larger and at least one end will have a point. Maybe for copper crafting tho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They were used back in the 1800s to mark and mangle furniture to give it that antique look.

Edited by HandyDan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used tools like this for windows as stated in my earlier thread but if I was to vote for best guess it would be for Mike @DRAGON1 and his bicycle tire tool statement.  I bet we were given these tire tools for our "similar" job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No sign of any split in the tip. And why the wound-wire "ferrules"? That implies that the tools were subject to some serious sidewards forces.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Who We Are

Operation Ward 57 Challenge Coin Display Project

We are a woodworking community with an emphasis on sharing and learning the skilled craft of woodworking and all of its related disciplines. Our community is open to everyone who wishes to join us. We support our American veterans and active duty, being a veteran is not a prerequisite to join. Join us now!

Objective

Air Force Command Center Plaque

Of course just like most online woodworking communities we are centralized in the arts, crafts, and trades that are woodworking. But, we have another focus in our Patriot Woodworker community, we are the only woodworking community that was founded on our care and concern for our disabled veterans.

Volunteer

Patriot Woodworker Volunteers

The Patriot Woodworkers are an all volunteer community, from the staff and hosts who run our online woodworking community to the members who frequent our forums, you'll find volunteers in all of us. We are not on a payroll, unless you consider the spiritual rewards gained from volunteering, as compensation.

Education

Logging

One of the many projects we are working on is a wiki for our online community. A wiki is a great way for woodworkers and enthusiasts to share their knowledge to others, and to impart their knowledge for others to learn from, and utilize as well for their own benefit. We hope you'll consider being a wiki contributor.

×