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Harry Brink

Starter Holes

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Where's a good place to put your blade starting holes?

I have been putting them away from the cut line but when I'm cutting and get back to the starting point I have a heck of a time meeting in the right place. Seems I always have to sand or file the area smooth.

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Harry

I start mine close to  place like  a sharp corner, Much less noticable and easier to match up. They can be inside corners or outside ones. I have alos found the points in the design serve well. I'll try and work on some drawings to better explain this for you. As you develop more expierance you will learn all the neat little tricks. Give me a few days and I'll see what I can come up with for you.

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On "teardrop" openings  I'll put the hole near the sharp inside corner; then cut to the corner without touching the lines, back up, turn around, back to the corner and then cut on the line.

On complex openings, I'll place the hole near, not on, an outside corner.

Tips for drills

1 use cobalt alloy drill bits; they are stiffer and will not bend in the hole as much as other alloys

2 with small bits, crank the speed up to the highest your drill will go. This will give cleaner holes with less tearout.

 

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I would check on why you are having trouble meeting the same line before I changed my start point.

are you changing what side of the line you are cutting on? Or is the blade not tracing straight? What tool are we talking about? Scroll saw? Circular? Jig? Trim?

a lot of times it's the operator pushing the blade that causes it to go awry and not meet.

 

try slowing down, staying on the line and when you have to meet another cut slow way down and let the blade meet the other cut.  Let the blade do the work.

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2 hours ago, DRAGON1 said:

 

 

try slowing down, staying on the line and when you have to meet another cut slow way down and let the blade meet the other cut.  Let the blade do the work.

That's what I've been doing since I started this post. Coming out a lot better.

A sharp blade makes a world of difference also.

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Hmmmmm - "at the beginning" - novel idea - but GRRRRRRRREAT :)

 

Super stuff guys - Harry, I have nothing to add - let us know how these work for you.

Edited by Fred Wilson

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10 hours ago, DRAGON1 said:

Hey Harry, you ever try spiral blades?

Not yet. I did try one years ago and in my old saw couldn't keep it in the holder so gave up.

I have a pattern that may be easier to cut with one so we'll see.

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55 minutes ago, Harry Brink said:

Not yet. I did try one years ago and in my old saw couldn't keep it in the holder so gave up.

I have a pattern that may be easier to cut with one so we'll see.

Did you try flattening out the ends? When the blades are made they are twisted as a last manufacturing step. The twist goes the whole length of the blade. I always flatten out the ends so that the clamps on the saw tighten down on a flat surface and not on a spiral. If you don't do this the clamp will loosen and the blade will slip out.

 

Bill

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7 hours ago, schnewj said:

Did you try flattening out the ends? When the blades are made they are twisted as a last manufacturing step. The twist goes the whole length of the blade. I always flatten out the ends so that the clamps on the saw tighten down on a flat surface and not on a spiral. If you don't do this the clamp will loosen and the blade will slip out.

 

Bill

Flying Dutchman blades sells spiral blades with flat ends. The only use I have for spiral blades is cutting Plexiglas, other than that use..... meh.

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The Flying Dutchman are the best. As for the spirals, once you learn to control the aggressiveness, they are great for intricate patterns with a lot of small areas to cut.

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image.jpegI use nothing but the spirals these days or my Dremel router.

It's the only blade I can't blame when it goes off the line. Lol

Same with the router. It only cuts where I want it to.

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Well, Dragon - there ya go - It's hard to blame the blade when I have my hands on the wood.

A wise ole feller once told me - "No one knows you went off the line when the pattern is removed."  I'm a true believer in that statement.

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great bone fish...

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