Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'workbench'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • The Woodworking Discussion Forum
    • Introduce Yourself
    • General Woodworking
    • Wood Turners
    • Wood Carving
    • Hand Tools
    • Scroll Sawing
    • Finishing
    • CNC
    • Tools, Research, Reviews and Safety
    • Show Us Your Woodworking Shops
    • Plans and Software
    • The Veterans Corner and Causes Forum
  • The Old Machinery Discussion Forum
    • Old Woodworking Machinery
    • Old Metalworking Machinery
    • Old Machinery Operating and Restoration Tips
    • Old Woodworking Machinery Archive
    • Old Machinery Badges and Decals
  • The Home Improvement Forum
    • Home Improvement
    • Patio and Outdoors
  • The Scrap Bin
    • Free for All
    • The Classified, Swap and Sale
    • Patriot Woodworker Member Meetings
    • The Patriot's Pulse
    • Announcements
    • Network Tutorials
    • Bugs and Issues

Categories

  • Book and Literature
  • CNC Files
    • CAD Files
    • CAM Files
    • CNC Reference and Tutorials
  • General Woodworking
    • Shop Charts
    • Shop Jigs
    • Shop Furniture
    • Arts and Crafts
    • Furnishings
    • Musical Instruments
    • Wooden Toys
    • Yard and Outdoors
  • Home Improvement
  • Old Machinery Badge & Decal Images
    • Beaver Power Tools-Callander Foundry
    • Delta Specialty Co.
    • Delta Mfg. Co.
    • Delta Milwaukee
    • Delta Rockwell
    • Walker Turner
    • Sears Companion
    • Sears Craftsman
    • Sears Dunlap
  • Sketchup Sharing Center
    • Furnishings
    • Shop Jigs
    • Arts and Crafts
    • Sketchup Tutorials
  • Scroll Saw Patterns

Blogs

  • Building A Walnut Shotgun Case
  • Military Challenge Coin Display Build
  • SJUSD Veterans Recieve Plaques from Patriot Tigers
  • The Pastor’s Table or I Think My Sister Is Trying To Buy My Way Into Heaven
  • Small Patch Musings and Such
  • Steve Krumanaker
  • Christmas 2016
  • Photography
  • Cherry Entertainment Center
  • Another Church Table
  • Inside Out Turning
  • Segmented Turning
  • Canon Ball Bed
  • Situation Normal, All Fired Up
  • DUST COLLECTORS 101
  • Workbench PIP
  • Republishing the French Rolling Pin blog

Product Groups

  • Old Hand Tools
  • New Hand Tools
  • Freedom Caps
  • T-Shirts

Marker Groups

  • Members
  • Sponsors
  • Administrators
  • Forum Hosts

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


First Name


Last Name


My Location


My Woodworking Interests


My skill level is


Website URL


Favorite Quote


AIM


MSN


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Facebook URL


Twitter Feed URL


My Clubs and Organizations

Found 119 results

  1. What's on your work bench? This is the official topic for images and friendly chatter regarding that all important surface, the personal statement of your shop, the steadfast friend we can always count on, the space of your shop that nobody knows better than you, we are talking about the almighty "Work Bench". Submit your images now! That's right, don't clean it up, don't be embarrassed, the messier the better, or if there is nothing on it at all, that is fine too. If you have not touched your bench in years, and you have taken a break from woodworking and have boxes piled on it, we want that image too! All images are welcome. Spirit of Topic This is a Hit-n-Run topic, as you walk past your bench, whip out your camera or smart phone, and snap a shot, load it up here. No need for text explanations if you don't want too. To kick this off, walk out in your shop and snap a picture of your bench surface now, and lets get this topic rolling. This will be an ongoing topic, for you to share images of your bench top today, and every day. Types of benches Some of us have small benches, some of us have big benches, some of us use a space in our dining room, some may have a picnic table they use for a bench, and some of us may have a bench of all benches, the traditional joiners bench, or a beautiful full cabinet shakers bench. No matter what you call your work surface, no matter what your work surface looks like, we want to see images of your bench! Thank you in advance to the participants!
  2. Where to start is to determine just what do you want to use the bench for. At the time for me it was flatwork and planing. I looked at many plans and decided on parts of several. Not sure where each part came from but the contributing plans were in Wood Magazine, Shop Notes and Popular Mechanics. I started with the vices. Both are Lee Valley and maybe even paid full price. They are both front vices but one is mounted on the end. Next is to decide on the wood. I wanted White Oak and it is hard to find at the mill. Well, I did not want to pay 8 plus a foot for that so it took a couple years to find. I think I paid $2.50 a foot. The design I put together has a three layer MDF (3/4) top plus 1/4 Masonite sacrificial layer. This is trimmed in 2 inch White Oak. Yes it took 2 people to move this into place. The legs are a three board glue up and have a center rail thru mortise connecting two end leg sets. The upper and lower rails are wrapped around a lower shelf of MDF and attached with bed bolts. The drawer unit is designed to fit planes , chisels and other small woodworking tools. Full PIP with pictures will be next up just stay tuned.
  3. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1967 Dingbat This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 10/15/2019 Category Yard and Outdoors  
  4. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  5. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1967 Adding a Room to Your Home This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 10/12/2019 Category Home Improvement  
  6. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  7. Good day folks, I am adding terminology for our wiki in the category of Workbenches. If you have the time, could you help build our list in this topic? You can add your entries here in this topic. I'd like to start with Workbench types. Here are just a few to get us going. Roubo Danish European More entries are greatly appreciated! And if you have any suggestions on whether a category or type is more appropriate? Roubo Workbench
  8. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  9. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1967 24 Apartment Martin House This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 10/10/2019 Category Yard and Outdoors  
  10. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  11. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1967 Spinning Wheel (Part 2) See Part 1 This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 10/10/2019 Category Furnishings
  12. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  13. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1967 Spin Dip This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 10/10/2019 Category Yard and Outdoors  
  14. Ever since 3 years ago when I got a bigger shop, I've wanted a bigger work table. My old one was just a bit too small to hold the linen cabinets, dressers, bookcases, and bunk beds that I've made over the last 5 years. I have a nice Tage Frid design Euro-workbench that I made when I was first getting serious in woodworking. It's fine, but too small for much assembly work. My objectives were: 1. 4x8 top, or close to it to hold the tall and wide projects that seem to be coming my way. 2. Storage underneath for frequently used tools and hardware. Since I decided to fully retire this spring, I have lots of specialty hardware that I used to take onsite that can now reside in the shop, but I need a place for it. I managed to win a bid for the wine display when a local Sam's Club closed and I got about 25 wine box displays made from 1/2" baltic birch. They will make fine drawers. In addition for my $8, I got about $20 worth of Roberson screws, a bunch of 2x4 shorts, about 10 pieces of 3/8" plywood, and some metal racks (that I gave to a friend who runs a feed mill). 3. A place for my Emmert patternmaker's vise that I've never had a place for. It's a heavy guy about 75 lb. Rotates around, swivels out, and holds tapered pieces. 4. Able to disassemble with minimal work in case I need to move it in the future. 5. Some place where I can do glue up, assembly, routing, sanding and whatever on parts. Here's some of the wine boxes, a few of which I've cut hand-holds in. The rest will get it later. I have a jig, use a plunge router with a bushing and mortising bit. The start was to head to Menards and buy some #1 Southern Yellow Pine (SYP) 2x8 joist material. This tends to be straighter and less knotty. I look for stuff that's near the center of the tree. Then I rip in in half and get some nice quarter- and rift-sawn wood. This is much better than the picked over 2x4 that are junky. SYP dries fairly fast. I used part of the lot to make some door frames for my shed, then other projects jumped the line, so it's been sitting for a couple of months. Once ripped, I ran all 4 sides through the planer to get smooth and clean surfaces. No one will know that it's 1 7/16 thick and not 1 1/2" Two layers of 3/4" BCX plywood for the top A story stick to double check my math, joinery, and layout for all the cuts, and a few more trial cuts from cut-off material. I thought about how to make the whole thing sturdy, yet disassemble with ease. While driving across the state, my mind came up with this approach to support all the drawers. Here's the prototype joint for the drawer runners into the vertical supports That works and gave my dado head a real workout. Stock for drawer runners and vertical supports. Until next time, working on rabbeting the drawer glides.
  15. Tonight I pulled my end vise from my new bench. When I picked up my bench over a month ago, I noticed the vise was very stiff. Beyond stiff, actually the tube holes swelled around the tubes to the point of zero clearance, as a matter of fact the wood was tight around the tubes. I don't know when the last time was that the previous owner used his vise, it could have been years, judging by how his shop appeared to have not been worked in for a long time, he may have not known that his vise was nearly in-operable. at 95 years old, he may not have even been able to spin the handle, maybe, maybe not. I was able to turn the handle, it was tight but functioned. I removed the end vise from the bench top, I had to remove 4 bolts and unscrew the tube supports from under the top, the straight slot screws were a joy to spin out. Image below, end vise removed. Once it was unbolted and unscrewed, I had to wiggle it off the hard wood spline you see in the first image. I quickly set it on the floor, it was heavy. It is as wide as the bench, and takes up about a half of the real estate under the bench. Jim, the previous owner, all his work was and is so precise, I have viewed his metal working, leather work, and woodworking, and all his work was done with careful precision, I am only surmising here, but with his machinist background I am wagering he made this vise to operate with very close tolerances, regarding the tube holes, possibly not taking wood movement or swelling into consideration. But then as I type this, I am telling myself, he was a highly experienced woodworker, he must of known about wood movement, so the fact that his home is only blocks from the ocean, may have more to do with the swelling around the vise tube holes than the manufacturing process. Top of the vise, note the dog holes in the top face. I had to remove the pins that held the sliding block in place on the operating tubes. The two inside tubes are fixed, the two outside tubes slide. The tubes were so tight, I had to use a combination of pounding, and letting the vise do its own work against it self. I inserted two blocks of wood between the end tubes, and the stationary block, then screwed the vise closed, and pushed the end stationary block off the tubes. Vise is flipped over and viewing bottom of vise. Finally, after much persuasion and heavy thinking, I got the entire assembly separated. I had to carefully beat and push the blocks off the tubes, imagine how stiff the vise was to actually operate. Now the work begins to create some daylight between the tube holes, and the tubes themselves. I am being creative right now on how to do this, so any suggestions are greatly appreciated. My first thought is to spend some time with a sanding drum on a drill, and just sand the inside of the holes till I have about 1/32nd all around the tubes. I love this old vise, I hope to breath new life into it, and have a fully functional end vise, I know I will, just takes a little elbow grease.
  16. My shop is a small,15x15 area. No windows. I did clean up, a lot, before the photos. Don’t know what else to say...it’s small.
  17. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1967 Table Tennis A great project for your outdoor patio or indoor game room, don't buy one, build it! Submitter John Morris Submitted 09/08/2019 Category Yard and Outdoors  
  18. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    A great project for your outdoor patio or indoor game room, don't buy one, build it!
  19. Like Ernie, my tool well became a junk catcher and I filled it in recently. A "Mil" is 0.001" the 4 mil is called the wet mil, and the resulting 1 mil is called the dry mil. Note this is sponsored by Waterlox. I took a class from Ernie 15 or so years ago. His shop is in a barn right across the road from the Boy Scout camp I went to years ago. Now a county park. Amish buggies still trot by on the road. https://www.waterlox.com/project-help/video?id=469e6831b68d431db75d2d4d355a93d1
  20. I have continued to scan my collection of Workbench Magazine plans for our guests and members to download from our Files Department, and I thought I'd share the Shop Tips section of the magazine as well. As is the case with my file downloads for plans from Workbench Magazine, the same applies here, I have received permission from the current Workbench Magazine to publish the old articles and plans on the open source web. Please see the collection of plans as well at https://thepatriotwoodworker.com/files/ Enjoy! These tips still apply to our work today, very cool!
  21. View File Workbench Magazine May-June 1967 Tray Table First a generous-size serving tray, then a bed table with short legs that fold down from the underside this versatile unit finally becomes a TV snack table by a quick change of legs. The short legs are fitted in a frame that is held inside the tray by the ingenious use of Tee Nuts and thumbscrews. The projecting screws slip into short lengths of tubing “force-fitted” in holes in the ends of the leg frame. When the long legs are to be used, the thumb-screws are backed out, the frame removed and the legs installed. The screws fit in holes in the upper ends of the legs, and are held by nuts turned against flat washers. Source: Workbench Magazine May-June 1967 Submitter John Morris Submitted 08/26/2019 Category Furnishings  
  22. Version 1.0.0

    0 downloads

    First a generous-size serving tray, then a bed table with short legs that fold down from the underside this versatile unit finally becomes a TV snack table by a quick change of legs. The short legs are fitted in a frame that is held inside the tray by the ingenious use of Tee Nuts and thumbscrews. The projecting screws slip into short lengths of tubing “force-fitted” in holes in the ends of the leg frame. When the long legs are to be used, the thumb-screws are backed out, the frame removed and the legs installed. The screws fit in holes in the upper ends of the legs, and are held by nuts turned against flat washers. Source: Workbench Magazine May-June 1967
  23. @John Morris, since you occasionally post items from the old Workbench magazine, I thought you might be interested in this offer from Woodsmith magazine. Just a disclaimer, of course I have no financial interest in either Workbench or Woodsmith. I tried this a few minutes ago and somehow lost the page, so this might show up as a double post.
  24. I have continued to scan my collection of Workbench Magazine plans for our guests and members to download from our Files Department, and I thought I'd share the Shop Tips section of the magazine as well. As is the case with my file downloads for plans from Workbench Magazine, the same applies here, I have received permission from the current Workbench Magazine to publish the old articles and plans on the open source web. Please see the collection of plans as well at https://thepatriotwoodworker.com/files/ Enjoy! These tips still apply to our work today, very cool!
  25. View File Workbench Magazine March-April 1967 Clock Spice Rack This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 06/04/2019 Category Arts and Crafts  
×
×
  • Create New...