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Found 125 results

  1. All this talk about Carbide Wood Lathe Tools I thought I needed to try one. Prices are high so i made my own. I used 4140 tool steel for the shaft. I almost messed up when milling the flat. The steel started to work hard from the heat of the mill. The mill made the cut but drilling and taping was tough. Ash handle with brass ferrule. I have 100's of different carbide tips to try. I snapped the first tip when I tightened the screw. I then put a brass washer under the screw and that seemed to fix that problem. It's not been tested yet. I'll keep you up to date.
  2. As a wood turner, who has inspired you to try something you've not done before? What form, method, embellishment, or even comments have made you push yourself? For me, first and foremost is a man most of you won't know, Neil Gloudemans, Neil was our club president when I first joined and is one of the artists featured in this article from Woodworkers Journal. I once watched Neil turn a cowboy hat, from round blank to ready for the press in just under two hours, still amazing to me. Cindy Drozda of course, admittedly my finials aren't even a close approximation of hers, she is an excellent teacher and technician. Binh Pho, although I don't really like his interpretation on most of his pieces, he turns beautiful forms to a very thin wall and having that skill is something he has inspired me to learn, results are mixed to this point! Molly Winton, her embellishment with pyrography led me to invest a machine and start learning some wood burning techniques. Like turning, there is a big learning curve and there is always another pen or tip to buy. A lady named Ellen Wolters, she is a you tube author and an amazing zentangle artist, watching her, I knew immediately that art form was something I wanted to incorporate into my pieces. Pablo Picasso, not for his art, most of which I don't understand, ok, I don't understand any of it. To me, his is inspirational for his quotes and his attitudes. You may have noticed, one of his quotes is part of my signature; "I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn to do it" To me, that embodies a wood turners spirit. There are others of course and there will be more but these are a few who come to mind. So, who inspires you? Steve
  3. Here are some pictures of my deep hollowing set up. I have about 22" reach with it. It's built around an inch and one quarter diameter bar. The bar is 4140 prehard steel. That should be stiff enough to reach out about 20" or so. I have about 22" of reach from the cutting tip to the torque arrestor that is welded to the round bar. There is a threaded stud in the front corner for attaching the laser pointer post. This picture shows the threaded stud a little better. The trap that holds the boring bar is made from two 1" diameter black iron pipes. The top pipe is adjustable so the trap can accept larger or smaller diameter boring bars. Eventually I may add a 1 1/2" bar but I have no immediate plans to do so. If/when I do it will be a simple matter to use the same trap for either bar by loosening one bolt on either end and repositioning. This is the "business end" of the hollower. The boring bar came from Grizzly as a set of five double ended bars. In addition to the angle slot the other end has a straight slot. I have both a 3/4" set and a 1" set of bars. The order from Grizzly also included 1/2" 3/8" and 1/4" boring bars. I could see no use to keep those so I gave them to my brother to use in his shop. This is just a view from the tail stock end of the lathe. I figure I have probably less than $150.00 in this rig. For one this heavy duty, retail would be in the $500.00 range. With that said, I don't believe the retail ones are over priced at all. It's easy to look at material cost only and think they are charging too much for something like this. In addition to my material cost there are several hours of machining that went into making this. My brother is no slouch at metal work. His normal shop rate would've pushed the cost of this well over what I would pay retail. Add to that, the cost of welding and there is no way it could be done for less. I'm blessed to have had someone to help me for hanging out together and a bowl or two. Several times I showed my brother how others had made theirs. Always his response, well we're going to do it better than that. As an example, the trap on others I've seen simply used machine bolts and a bunch of nuts to make the assembly. Adjusting the size would involve tedious loosening and tightening several nuts. Either that or they were welded to fit one size only. It will be a couple weeks before I get to try my hand at a deep vessel. I still have to make my steady rest and laser assembly. When I do get it all together you've got to know, I'll post pics!! Steve
  4. Finally got to try a deep hollow form, not real deep, about 13". First time I've tried something like this and there is lots to learn. The laser diode I was using wasn't the best choice and it wouldn't stay in one spot. Because of that and my own inexperience this piece is just too thin in a couple areas. It won't get much sanding because there is a very real possibility of sanding through. Still, for a first effort, I've got to be happy with the results. I also know there is a lot of room for improvement, especially in the form and getting a consistent thickness. Anyway, here is my first effort and a short video of the hollowing process. The base could be a little smaller and the funnel could also be smaller I think. I was surprised how difficult the big cove was to do and I can see there is room for improvement there as well. Wife says she loves it and I have to finish it but you know how they are. Thanks for looking Steve
  5. I've got a beautiful piece of walnut on the lathe, trying to do a hollow form about 14" deep and about the same major diameter. Drilling to start hollowing this morning and when I backed out to clear chips this is what I saw. No drill bit, this is a bad thing. At this point I'm over 10" deep with this bit. Fortunately I was drilling in steps and had made a good portion of the hole larger already. What now? Couldn't reach it with anything and there are chips packed tight around it. My first thought was, no way to save this. Still, I started picking at the shavings and blowing them out until they were pretty well clear, that took about an hour. After several failed attempts with rare earth magnets, screw drivers, etc. etc. I got the idea to make a loop in a piece of tie wire and slip it over the shaft. Held the wire with a pair of vice grips and ran the lathe slow. With a little help, the wire wound tight enough I could wiggle the drill bit a little using the wire and a screw driver. After about two hours I was able to get a purchase on the bit with a pair of deep reach needle nose and worked it the rest of way out. Next time, I'll be sure to clear chips more often and make doubly sure the set screws in my extension are tight. I think it will be faster that way. Steve
  6. These pieces are from 2014 or so. They may have been posted on the old Wood forum but don't really remember anymore. Anyway, I had this idea, made a few pieces and then just never got back to develop it further. A few days ago I saw someone post a similar turning on facebook so I thought I'd share the ones I did. These all incorporate rare earth magnets to create the illusion of a piece floating. This was my first attempt, a floating ball. I didn't do a real good job of hiding where the magnet is in the ring but in the globe the joint is nearly invisible. The ring in a ring is the second one I did. This one works two ways, the small ring will sit in the large ring or hang from the top. There are four magnets in all, two in each ring. This is first "hot air" balloon I did. When I first made it, the magnet in the balloon was glued in place and all a person had to do was position it near the ring and it would stay. The grand kids loved these and played with enough the magnet jarred loose and just rattles around inside the balloon. My first thought was to make a new balloon but after watching people try to get it to float and not being able to I like it better this way This is the last one I did, it was my first venture into piercing with a dental hand piece. There are four magnets in this one, one in the ring, two in the balloon, and one in the basket.
  7. I've got the demo for February for our club. Can't complain, several other members have really stepped up and covered the last few months. That makes it so much easier. Anyway, the Feb. demo will be two parts. The first half hour or so I'll be doing some sharpening on, and talking about the Tormek sharpener. I've allotted a half hour but if there are a few questions it could go longer. With that in mind I need a relatively quick project for the turning portion of the demo. Have decided to make a "Knitting Nancy" or French Knitter. A simple spindle project which will be a good skill builder and something I believe hasn't been done before. Even though it's a fairly simple thing to make I will still make several before I'm done. At the top beside the yarn is my first effort. I saw one that looked like they used paper clips to hold the yarn but that didn't work well for me, that and I had the diameter too large to make a good stitch. I saw one someone made that used cotter keys as shown in the walnut one to the left. Cotter keys actually worked pretty well, but, they're cotter keys. I then decided to just make the pins to hold the yarn and they are pretty easy to do and look a lot better IMO. The one in the middle is my last effort and has the wooden pins. The little yarn rope is what a person makes with one of these and is called an "Icord", although, our two year old grand daughter calls it a "snake". From what I read, an icord is a basic knitting or crochet stitch and is used as a border or foundation for other stitches. There are three parts to one of these, the body, which is basically just a tube, the pins, and the hook, or pic. My first thought was to make a hook but after experimenting a little bit I realized the pic type actually is easier to use. The pic is a nice little skew project all by itself. Will probably do five or six more of these, last couple I will record and work out of my tool bags to make sure I don't forget anything. Steve
  8. There is a first time for everything they say. Today, for me, that "first time thing" was turning a cowboy hat. About six hours from mounting the blank to putting it in the bending jig. I could never have turned this without the guidance, the encouragement, the tutelage, and did I mention the encouragement? Of my good friend and mentor, Bob Lipp, who is Vice President of our local wood turning club. We started with a bradford pear blank, about 20" diameter and 8" thick or so. The first thing he told me to do was to true it up for a tenon and then he showed me how to shape the outside. I did all the cuts but it was his express instructions that allowed me to do them. After the shaping is all done on the outside it's time to form the brim. The red dots are led lights shining through from the other side. The brim is about as thick as a credit card. After the brim is completed the hollowing is done for the rest of the hat. It also ends up being about the thickness of a credit card, although I think mine may be a little thicker. After the turning is done the hat is put in a bending jig. I'm excited to see how this bends and looking forward to trying on my own.
  9. Have a current order for honey dippers, this is the first batch of 20 finished. Some of the these have some really nice grain in the lids. Steve
  10. Several years ago, WOOD magazine did a project, a "wood turned walking stick". It didn't happen very often but this particular project just spoke to me and I had to make it. That's kind of funny because at the time, if I'm being honest, I couldn't really call myself a wood turner. My lathe was a shopsmith and I turned a spindle if I just had to. Anyway, I ended up making several of those walking sticks for gifts or personal use. I have decided to revisit the project and hit the highlights of it for the May demo for our club. It's a very straight forward thing to make except for the handle. I have a handle on the lathe, have turned it and done some shaping. Still a little more to do but it's coming along. Two things are different this time around. In the article, a compass is let into the handle with a cavity under it for matches, a map, or whatever. Those compasses are no longer available and I haven't been able to find a substitute so I'll just round the top. The other thing that's different is the EWT negative rake insert I now have in my arsenal. They are perfect for shaping the finger slots. Here's a WIP picture. Still some tweaking to do on this one but I'm happy with it to this point. The neat thing about this walking stick is, it's made in four pieces so a person doesn't need a real long bed to do it. One of the best WOOD projects ever IMO. Steve
  11. Anyone can join in to this fantastic tradition since 2004. Walk into any Woodcraft Store and turn pens for our troops!
  12. My wife says these are called Russian Dolls. Maybe better known where they are maid, made, Matryoshka or Babushka. They are made of wood turned on a lathe and they all stack into each other...A good project for you real turners!!!!! I know you guys with some Russian heritage just has to make a few sets of these for Christmas or the 4th of June ?
  13. My shop is a small,15x15 area. No windows. I did clean up, a lot, before the photos. Don’t know what else to say...it’s small.
  14. Moving along with the demo prep. Have two sticks completed and my demo routine pretty will figured out. I have to make one more stick to leave in component form and then probably a few components in different stages of completion in case of a severe catch or other catastrophe. I'd forgotten what a nice project this stick is. These two will eventually be gifted to a soon to be retired neighbor and his wife. Bruce is a good friend, and more importantly, a licensed electrician . He and I have helped each other back and forth for 30 years or more. It's always a good thing for him to owe me a favor! once a few more coats of oil are applied, the sticks get a 3/4" rubber cane tip on the bottom.
  15. Most everyone who visits this forum will know I have a youtube channel. For those who don't do videos I can tell you, one of the real rewards for a youtube author is when a person takes the time to comment and let the author know they liked the video. I've had some very positive comments and some, not so much. Well, I checked my channel this morning and saw this comment, from one Jasper Krumanaker. For the record, this is a gloat, this is a brag, and this is from a misty eyed proud PaPa. "I'm his grand child his work is amazing and so is him" Steve
  16. So people keep asking for pictures so here’s a picture of my first bowl. Also a picture of a gag gift for the wife. Still need to hollow the bottom out and then cast some sky blue epoxy in the void. I’m calling it “glass bottom bowl.”
  17. So I was picking up some moldy sweet gum tree stumps and the lady I’m getting them from says she’s selling for lathe cause she’s never used it and they are moving. The price is insane at 50 dollars. It’s a bench pro 4 speed wood lathe. I’ve been looking it up online and I get nothing. It’s a off/sub brand and just trying to get some info on before I pull the trigger on it. I’m going back tomorrow with my tools to see if it runs and turns nice. Anyone heard of it or has one maybe.
  18. Our club meets this Sunday, I got demo duty. In the interest of spring, doing an easy spindle project. Garden dibbles. They're easy to do but also a good skill builder. Plan to spend a bit of time on rolling a bead and how important is getting the "V" notch right. Steve
  19. Hey folks! I'm a new turner. Just been making shavings trying to learn the tools but I think I'm ready for my first project. I need some tool handles for some carbide turning tools I picked up. I have quite a bit of sassafrass just lying around so I think that would make some good handles. I'll be posting pics (of course) and I'm open to any and all critiques, tips and general advise. The pieces are about 8", 9" and 10" long by about 2.5" in diameter. My first step will be to shape the handles, then I need to find something to use as ferrules before attempting to mount the tools. Thanks for putting up with "the new guy".
  20. I posted earlier I was going to make a French knitter, or knitting nancy for the Feb. demo for our club. I've often said, no one learns more during a demo than the person doing the demo. I've also often said, I will make every mistake possible before I figure something out. This project is a good example of both of those statements. Since it's still winter and kind of the holidays I thought about making one in a kind of snow man shape. Grabbed a piece of spalted birch and turned this one. I was basically happy with it but it occurred to me I could make a snowman(or snowlady) shape and hide the pins and pic under the hat. Tried to do a couple with the spalted birch but it was too punky to get a good fit between the hat and the tenon. I also felt it was important to get a good grain match so the whole thing would look like just one piece. Since the spalted wood was too punky I grabbed a piece of hard maple. Parted off a piece for the lid and drilled to accept a tenon. Naturally I forgot it would have to be drilled deeper to make room for the pins and pic. Of course, I noticed this about 2 seconds after parting it off so I couldn't fix it. Since it's important to me to match the grain and hide the joint I grabbed a whole new piece of wood to start over. Okay, so now I've made a new snowman and have the hat drilled deep enough to work. Grain matches nicely and it's a nice friction fit. Plenty of clearance for the pins and the pic. Made the pic, fits nicely under the hat and it's nice snug fit in the center hole of the snowman. Too snug actually, can't really grasp the pic to remove it easily. Decide I'm going to put a little step on the next one so it won't go in so far and will be easier to remove. Great idea, except I left the top to big around to fit between the pins. Back to the lathe, last one works but is too sloppy and will rattle when it's under the lid. Enough for today, back to the lathe in morning and incorporate all the little nuances to maybe make one that will be just right. All of these little details that I'm figuring out will become part of the demo. It's a simple little turning but I've learned a lot already. Steve
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