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Found 16 results

  1. It's been a beautiful couple of days here in south central Pennsylvania. I took advantage of the weather forecast and got most of the plants into the garden. It's supposed to rain tomorrow so that should get them a good start. Our Patriot turners have been busy this week with projects and posts. @Charles Nicholls started a thread on a bowl he is starting to turn. Charles asked our thoughts on the integrity of the bowl blank. Please check out his post and see if you can add any suggestions- In that same thread, Charles posted a picture of a top he is making- @Smallpatch is making teapots! He explains the process in his post- @PostalTom Asked a question about Mesquite and its' turning characteristics. If you ever turned Mesquite or would like to know what our turners said, check out his post at- @Gerald showed us his super score from ebay. He won a bid on a SuperNova 2 chuck. Our turners demonstrated great restraint in not teasing him too much about such a good deal. @Smallpatch also posted a topic about where to get free wood for turning. Your town may have a similar location. If you live in New Hampshire, the New England Woodturning Symposium is being held this weekend- May 12. Click on the above image to get more information about the symposium. The latest Woodturning OnLine newsletter arrived. Some great information as always. A nice video from Mike Waldt on creating a long stemmed goblet with captive rings- Another article, from the newsletter covers different methods of reverse chucking a bowl. It is a "PDF" by John Lucas. Here's the link- http://centralillinoiswoodturners.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/Reverse-Turning-Bowls.pdf The full newsletter can be read at- http://www.woodturningonline.com/index.php I was lucky enough to score some free wood myself. One of my former students- and then teaching partner, cut down some trees at his home. One of them was a flame box elder. He brought me several logs. I think I can get several bowls and maybe a couple of shallow platters. I used TiteBond to seal the ends. We'll see how that works compared to latex paint. Safe turning
  2. HandyDan

    Spin Top with Launcher

    Family Christmas Dinner is coming up soon. Every year I like to make a handmade toy for everyone to amuse themselves with. This year it is string top with launchers. Should be about 40 of them there. Used some spindles from a crib I picked up at the curb on a trash day. Ran three sides through the jointer for a flat to register on for drilling the holes. Got four launchers from each spindle. Had a bunch of 3/8 X 4 inch metal shafts and was able to turn them to a point on each end and cut them in half for the spindles. I cut the shafts to .260 inches 5/8" down on the point ends which made a press fit into the hard maple blanks that I drilled .250 inch holes into. Tight enough fit that I didn't have to glue them. Mounted them in a collet chuck and turned them to shape.
  3. Gerald

    Tops

    These are the tops I am working on . Use clear acrylic an it darkened too much. The jewel is a Swarovski crystal.
  4. Ron Altier

    Chatter tool top

    I made two of them out of Hickory, definitely not a good wood to do this with, or at least the piece I had. The first didn't do well and the designs looked bad. This piece did much better. A good pull will keep it going for nearly3 minutes. Grandkids will get both
  5. lew

    Finishing Up The Top

    With the base finished, all that was left to do was trim out the top with the walnut edge trim. Glue, clamps and some pin nails. I forgot to take photos of the top to apron mounting system but this Sketchup drawing should explain what I did. These are simple wooden clips with their tabs captured in slots that run around the perimeter of the inside of the aprons. The slot is 1/4" wide by 3/8" deep. The clips are cut from 3/4" thick maple and the tabs sized of a snug fit in the slots. Screws are used to secure the clip to the top. The hole is slightly over-sized and the screws are the type used for pocket holes- nice large heads. The finished table is awaiting pickup- The church members are going to apply the finish. If they send a picture, I'll add it here. Thanks for following along and the very kind comments that have been posted along the way.
  6. steven newman

    57db2b22b2ac9-topwithoutglare.JPG

    From the album: Walnut Night Stand

    Back view, showing the armrests, and the slats for the back. Back rung is a store-bought 7/8" dowel. Finish is two coats of Witch's Brew ( Pumpkin Pine?). The "bench" in the background is my Saw Bench, now over 2 years old.
  7. HandyDan

    String Tops the String

    Research on the strings for tops didn't yield much. All I found is that the length of the string matters. It said 60" was a good length but did not specify the thickness of the string. I have a spool of nylon sash cord for blinds and started out using it. It is made of nylon and I found it may be too slippery. I got the tops working well with it after some practice but thought the kids may not have the ability or patience for that . I went looking for some type of cotton cord but didn't find anything local thick enough. I did find balls of natural cord at Hobby Lobby that looked good but not thick enough either. I bought it anyway with the thought I may be able to spin two strands together using the same technique I used for the Yo-Yos. Gave it a shot and it worked well with a cord .140" thick. The sash cord was .100 inches thick. After the first cord was made I knew I had a winner. The tops worked easier and I attribute that not only to the thicker cord but to the fact that the cord ended up closer to the outside diameter of the top which theoretically would get the top spinning easier right off the bat when thrown. So here is how I made them. I cut a 152" length of the cord shown and tied a knot in each end. The cord is three strands and I took large paper clips and hooked a strand on each end. I hooked one end on a stationary hook and the other end on a hook inserted in my drill. I twisted the cord running the drill in forward/clockwise motion until the length shortened up 24". While spinning it with the drill I kept moderate pressure on it holding back on the drill enough to keep the slack and whip out of the cord. Once it is 24" shorter there is plenty of twist and will knot up with the speed of light if constant tension is not held on it. Now the drill end has to be removed from the drill and put on the stationary hook with the other end. The drill hook has to be holding the half way mark as you do this. My arms are long enough that I could hook the string with the drill and move the end without it knotting. It would have been easier with a second person but I found it doable. Now that the cord is hooked halfway the drill has to be switched into reverse and spun in a counterclockwise direction. For some reason the cord gets longer as it is reverse spun and after spinning it for a while it will start to shorten up again. When this happens the top string is done. Put a knot big enough in one end to catch the string when winding and a finger loop or a button for the back of the fingers which ever you prefer. Oddly enough the string wound the way it is pictured above at the suggested 60" and the tops spin well. How about two at a time?
  8. Charles Nicholls

    TopMaple.JPG

    From the album: Throw Tops

    Maple top that I made today. It's made with 3 1x pieces of maple that are glued together and then turned.
  9. Had to go and find Mr. Gumption again...when I did, he wound up working the "H" out of me. You know it is rough, when you are dripping on the wood you working on, even had it running down the inside of my glasses Anyway, today task was mainly to get a top almost done. Cambered Jack plane to level the playing fields.. Followed by a slightly larger plane Once the place was flat, time to make a jig. First I needed a center point.. And, as for the jig? Just a scrap of wood, a screw in the middle, set in the center of the panel. Another hole is 9" away, for a pencil to mark a circle. Not enough room here to build Norm's circle cutting jig...I had to free hand it on the bandsaw. Trying to leave the lines, at least... Well, it is close. anyway...beltsander, palmsander to smooth the curves a bit. Then time for this to take over a spokeshave? worked the the edge down to something I liked.. Tried to also round the edges a bit, too. I don't like to throw away scraps, as they can be handy to have around...this time it was one of the cut-offs from the circle cutting.. This could give a little help, drawing out some legs? A few adjustments, here and there, had to allow for a dovetail as well......Resawed a blank down to a bit thinner section, and got these critters.. Leg blanks? Something like this? Well..it is a start, anyway. As for that column thingy.......needed a break from sweating over a hot ..bench, so.. The "Fancy Side". Final shaping, and sanding. The "plain side? I also thinned down the collar and the tenon. Note there is a bead in the middle of the column now... Have this almost parted off, before I remembered sanding.....I also rubbed a stick of Cherry along the spinning blank, for a bit of shine. Plumb tuckered out, covered it wet walnut dust and shavings......I think that will do for today... Trying to get this done...have a doctor's visit Monday morning, seems me left knee is doing poorly.....noisey, loose inside, feels like the kneecap is in two pieces....we have to see what he says...
  10. Steve Krumanaker

    Some two piece tops

    Fun to do and fun to play with. Shafts are all maple, bodies are spalted beech or corian. Steve
  11. Part 2: This build was not going to be particularly difficult. My biggest concern was the maple top. I’ve built smaller edge grain tops before so the process was not unfamiliar; however, the staggered shorter length field pieces had me scratching my head about clamping and gluing. Also, I needed to consider the size of the top versus the capabilities of my shop equipment. My Dewalt 735 planer maxes out at around 13” wide and my little shop made drum sander can only handle very small work. John Moody suggested making the top in several sections and then assembling those sections into the final width. He also suggested using biscuits to aid in aligning the pieces during glue up. Sounded good to me so that’s what I did. I started with 8/4 rough, hard maple. Milled it down into the strips I’d need to build the top. I was really worried about the amount of waste there might. Sometimes thick pieces have a lot of internal stress and can end up looking like a piper cub propeller after they are cut. I got really lucky and almost all of the pieces were nice and straight. I spent several hours sorting, moving and labeling the pieces so there would be less of a chance of a mistake during glue up (not that completely eliminated snafus). I also marked all of the biscuit locations. As John suggested, the biscuits really helped align and keep the strips in place while clamping each section. I also used biscuits on the end joints where the shorter field pieces were joined. Maybe overkill on the clamps but I didn’t want to take any chances. For the field pieces that were made up from shorter lengths, I clamped the pieces end to end. Instead of trying to completely assemble each section at once, I opted to glue on and clamp one strip at a time until the section was finished. It took longer but I had more time to make sure everything was lining up. Working by yourself forces you to think the entire assembly process through thoroughly and sometimes even do a “practice run”. Eventually, I ended up here- All the labels and notes are clearly visible and I transferred some of the markings to the edges/back for reference during the final glue up. It seems like every time I clamp up an assembly like, I end up with a little irregularity on the edges. A quick pass through the jointer trued the edges and then it was on to the planer. 2 Next, the sections were glued together and sized for length. I used a straight edge and skill saw to trim the top to length. I guess I could have used the belt sander to smooth out the sections but I’ve really become a fan of the card scraper. One of our newer member- Todd Clippinger- has a really nice and quick procedure for sharpening card scrapers so you spend more time finishing then trying to produce that elusive “hook”. Originally, the edges of the top were to be square. The minister thought a chamfered edge would look nicer. A simple design change. Router and chamfer bit took care of it. A little more sanding (through 320 grit) and the top is done (except for the oil/wax). It weighed in at around 90 pounds.
  12. Charles Nicholls

    Maple and Beech Top

    From the album: Throw Tops

    Maple top that I am making today. It's made with 4 1x pieces of maple that are glued together on a square piece of beech for the center.
  13. steven newman

    Top is on the Table..PIP

    Legs look fat, top might be a bit thin..Boss is thinking "Night Stand" Still needs a finish.....have to go and BUY a can of something....this is a side view... Lonely looking thing. This is an end view Thinking MAYBE a darker colour for the legs? Kind of blend things together? Still need to get a box organized, as it is getting a bit full.. You might look through there, and see what kind of tools this will hold.....That smaller box with yellow handles sticking up, holds a set of chisels.....I need to find out what is stashed back there in the steel tool box....
  14. Got the narrow end thingy squared up, got the front footer squared away. Dragged out the slab of a top, ( two board glue up) and decided to try to level things a bit.. You'd think that a plane 3" shorter than that big #6c would be easier to push around....not. Got both faces flattened out Plane is a Stanley No.5-1/2 Type 17 Jumbo Jack same width as a #6, but is only 15" long. Got these flat, maybe a test fit of thingys? Just a few clamps to hold it in place, until I can do a few things with the tape measure... Will need a filler there to keep the top spread out above the door. Yep, the door will go here on the end. Need to make cleats to hold the floor/shelf. Debating on rounding off the corners of the top. Top had two knot HOLES, not just knots, these are through holes. Will make a plug to fill them. Router might get a workout later, as the Boss wanst a fancy edge....MIGHT have a bit for that. Going to be a Biggem...
  15. Charles Nicholls

    Walnut Pepper mill Top

    From the album: Pepper Mills

    Top of the walnut pepper mill I am trying to finish. Note the nasty tearout problem on this end grain, doesn't seem to matter what tool I use to try and stop it other than a large forstner bit. That MAY work IF I had one.
  16. I started a few days ago on the Kitchen Island top out of Maple. I went over to the Wood Stash and got enough maple to bring to the shop and start working on. The top has to be 41"x51"x2". I got all of the boards cuts a little over size and ready for the jointer Ran one side across the jointer and ready to run through the planer. After it was run through the planer I stacked it all and put some clamps on it to just check my size and be sure I was going to be okay to start the glue up. That is going to be one large Island top. So last night I was looking at either gluing it up in three of four glue ups and them putting those together. So those are the three panels and I am thinking I am going to do it in four just to give me more working time and make it easier to pull them tight together. I should get them glued tonight or first thing in the morning. Well it was Thursday Morning before I got the panels glued. I decided to glue them into four sections and I am so glad I did. Once the clamps were on there it was almost too heavy for me to lift off the assembly table. Also to glue up all for sections has taken almost a gallon of Titebond III glue. 1st Panel 2nd Panel 3rd and 4th Panels It will most likely be Saturday morning before I start gluing the panels together. I think I will glue two panels together and then when they are dry, glue the two sections together.

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