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Found 29 results

  1. Buckaroo

    Table Saw Push Stick

    Reading the push pencil/sticks/ice picks, knew I needed to throw this in. Old hand saw handle or cut exact copy to start. Cut 1/2'' ply bout 10'' high to attach that handle, 12" 18'' long shaped like that old hand saw. attach the 12'' or 18'' into the handle. Under the handle on the ply bottom. Cut the ply leaving a heel under the handle bout 1/4 ?high? to engage/catch the piece being pushed. Out at end of the 12'' 18'' ply,or more, glue some 80 grit to hold on to piece being pushed. Handle attached to 10'' high part is for safety. Now your hand is well above the blade & you have control.
  2. Stick486

    Center Finding.

    center finding: ("Thales Theorem") take your ruler and place zero inches on one edge.... move the ruler diagonally across the piece till you read a number at the other edge easily divisible by two... divide... that number is is the center... find it on the ruler and make your mark... to find that IRL measure of center... measure from the edge to the mark w/ the ruler perpendicular to the edge... no measure... say the stock is 3/4" thick/wide... put a 3/4" fostner bit in the DP.. slide the fence up to the bit and lock it down... presto... center of stock all done... finding spacing... Do your diagonal measure only instead of dividing by 2 divide by the number of pieces you want... example.. you want 5 pieces from stock 12±'' wide... diagonal measure 15'' and divide by 5.. quotient is 3... every 3'' make your mark.. (3, 6, 9, 12).. center finding ruler... lay the ruler on the piece and shift left or right till the measures are the same to both edges... mark the zero...
  3. Dadio

    Wooden Hinge

    Here is a pictorial of how to make a wooden hinge, I am not a professional,I think this is the common way to do it. someone mentioned that it was above their skill level, so I thought I would just submit the way I do it. There are all kinds of ways a person can cut the hinge,i.e. like a leaf,or a spear etc. to dress it up. Herb
  4. Fred Wilson

    Blade Alignment

    To start the "Tips and Tricks" off on a good note, I thought of what basics we should all be aware of and some tips to make the best cuttings we can. Remember, guys and gals, there is NO right or wrong answer to any of our topics. What best works for you is the way it should be. That being said, I think we can always learn a little from our fellow scrollers. Please chime in with your suggestions of your ways of doing things. It will always be appreciated by all. BLADE ALIGNMENT We all realize that the blade should be perpendicular to the table unless we are doing angle cuts. Great blade alignment is "required" in stack cutting (which we discuss later). What we don't normally check is front to back alignment, "fore/aft" movement of the blade, and "wobble". Â Let's take them one at a time and see what we can come up with. LEFT/RIGHT ALIGNMENT I have seen several ways, over the years. Â Most of them work pretty well. I use a machinest's right angle to set my blades. Â However, for some reason, this doesn't always work on my machine. Cut into a block of wood, back it out of the kerf, move the cut to the back of the blade and see it lines up. Using a scrap piece of 3/4" stock, cut a piece out, then move the cut side to the opposite side of the blade and see if it is aligned. Cut a small circle out of 3/4" stock and see if the bottom and the top of the hole are the same size. FORE AND AFT ALIGNMENT I generally use the machinest square for this one. BLADE WOBBLE This is when the blade moves either left or right from the top to the bottom of the cut. Problem could be either rails bent, misalignment of machine, or as simple as alignment in the blade holders. Need much more help on this one. YOUR IDEAS ? ? ? ? ? ?? The Eclipse scroll saw is the only saw that I know of that has solved the above problems. This saw design has gone back to some "ole timey" machines. Belt driven, with a "perfectly aligned" plunger system.
  5. https://www.popularwoodworking.com/tools/smooth-silk-perfect-countersink
  6. lew

    Please Add Tags!

    Relative to our new subcategories for "Tips", Please remember to add tags to your posts!
  7. Gerald

    Push Sticks

    These are my push sticks (no I have not been pushing @Stick486 around). The First is a 2x4 with notch cut out and corners rounded over and is used on the router table. The second is a simple piece of ply with notch for pushing and I use it on the bandsaw. The third is my standard cut from ply and allows gluing a replacement push block to the rear. The monster allows me to keep my hand as far as possible from the blade as possible, but it is cumbersome to use.
  8. Ron Altier

    Tips

    I think the new tips addition is great. Even an old dog can learn. It could easily be called "Tips and advise" I learn new things and get good advise that only experience can give
  9. Gerald

    Face Plate

    Some work is too small or otherwise will not fit a chuck so a sacrificial faceplate is the answer. I save my cut off scrapes that are left in the chuck after cutoff for these faceplates . To clean the surface for attachment use a spindle gouge to cut the surface to a slight concave . This will give an outside surface for the glue contact. Put a small bead of thick CA (preferred but can use thin) on the faceplate and spray accelerator on the blank. Mount the blank and can then spray more accelerator. Wait and appropriate time for a bond and then the faceplate can be mounted in the chuck for turning. Once turning is complete the blank can be released with a chisel in the glue joint and a sharp rap. You will need a pad or plastic bucket to help catch the turning .
  10. I clicked on a video showing a guy nailing brads in a lap corner joint. He said that since he was nailing so close to the end of the board, turn the brad upside down and blunt the point with a hammer. Your board will not split. Never heard of this before. Anyone know if it works as he said?
  11. Install a large window blind above/behind you. When you are setting up to turn, pull the blind down behind you and it will confine the cuttings to one area for easy clean up. When done turning, let it self wind back overhead out of the way.
  12. John Morris

    Tips Subcategories Forums

    Folks, I am so glad to see our new Tips Subcategories being used! Several things I would like to see, is. Please stay on topic related to the original tip submitted. Please do not submit another tip within the same tip topic that was created by another member. Please do not get into the back n forth, regarding how you would've performed the same operation, in other words please stay away from, "what you should of done", "what I would have done", "here is my method" etc etc. It defeats the purpose of individual tips created by each unique woodworker. If you have a different way, or improved way to perform a tip that was already entered by another woodworker, please submit your own version in a separate tip topic. Title your tips accordingly, the title should reflect what the tip is. In addition to the tags you will be using for your tip, please always include a tag "tip". I will surf back through the tips already created, and remove any content that does not follow the above guidelines, and I'll create an area to display these guidelines in each tip area. The Tips are brand new forums, this our chances to keep them clean and orderly, so that users in the future may search our growing database of tips, and find the content they need with ease. As a side note, "tags" will be mandatory soon. Thank you!
  13. Ron Altier

    Jig for Cutting Strips

    Years ago I came up with this idea for cutting strips by using my wooden feather board. I submitted it to a wood magazine. I won $25 and signed away all rights. As you can see, I just installed roller bearings. It worked very good. 3 months later, in a wood working sale flyer, there it was and labeled as "Dual use feather board, exciting new tool" That was my last submission of any kind.
  14. PostalTom

    Cheap Router Bit Storage

    My first router table was an over-engineered bench top affair. (Ever hear the saying that an elephant is a mouse built to government specifications? Well, I'm that guy.) I didn't have a sophisticated system to store my bits, so I used empty prescription bottles. No way the plastic would damage the edge of the bit, the bit was protected from damage by contacting anything else in the box or drawer into which the bit was very carefully placed, , and the bottles were free. A piece of masking tape took care of labeling. Downside was that most of the bottles not transparent, so a lot of picking up and reading the label was involved. Worked good until I built my current router table, and started using blocks to hold each bit.
  15. HandyDan

    Cutting Dowels in Bulk

    I recently made a thread cabinet for a sewing friend of mine. The spools were to be placed over dowels to keep the thread spools in order. I needed 168 four inch dowels. Decided I need 20 four foot dowels to come up with the number needed. Couldn't see myself making 168 cuts so I came up with a plan to wrap them all together with some plastic stretch wrap and give that a whirl. Marked off the a dowel every four inches and wrapped the dowels together in between the marks stretching the plastic nice and tight and put them through the table saw. Worked nicely. Got them all cut quickly and smoothly.
  16. 1. Beautify Finishing, including any coloring, beautifies the wood over a raw wood surface. It adds sheen level, accentuates grain and figure, can unify coloring variances, and can add chatoyance (glimmering like a cat's eye) It can give cheap woods appearance of a more expensive one (e.g., poplar into walnut or cherry, ebonized wood). 2. Protect Finish can protect wood from incidental damage such as liquids (water), scuffs, soiling, bacteria and in some cases UV damage. Look at what happens to wood when left outdoors in the rain or sun. Think of the molding around a door from the garage to the house that's never been finished -- it will be full of dirt and oils. 3. Provide a cleanable surface Again think of the garage door molding. Ever have one of those you have to clean? The dirt, body, and engine oils are deeply embedded and almost impossible to get rid of without some deep sanding. I've had to work on some farm tables with minimal to no finish on them. I always say that they're just one spilled glass of red wine or errant meatball from getting a permanent stain.
  17. Fred Wilson

    Tagging

    Hi folks. Fred here. We have been asked to be sure to tag our posts. It is great to see that most of us are already doing this. Tagging is a great way to simplify searching. Thanks again for your "tagging" fred
  18. Buckaroo

    QUICK TABLE

    FELLOW ASK ME BOUT BUILDING'M A TABLE. TOOK ME TO'EZ OFFICE. TOLD'M TO GET TWO LOW LEGAL FILE CABINETS. GO TO WHERE EVER HE CAN GIT A SLIGHTY DAMAGED INTERENCE DOOR. PLACE LOW LEGALS WHERE EVER, LAY DOOR ACROSS IT, USING PRE DRILLED HOLES FOR COMPUTER, PHONE,ETC.. SEEN'M LATER & HE LIKED'EZ NEW DESK & ALL THE STORAGE & COST.
  19. Ron Altier

    Woodworking tip

    I have submitted quite a few tips to woodworking magazines and have won 5 or 6 times. One that I liked real well also won a place in the top tips for the last 10 years. It is one you can use and works. I submitted it for the lathe, but you can use it in any tool area with wood chips flying. So simple. When I used my lathe, of course chips flew everywhere. I got an idea. I installed a window blind on the ceiling behind me. When I was going to turn something, I'd pull it down, this confined the chips to one area. Much easier to clean up. I put an old carpet on the floor that the chips fell on. Then I'd roll up the carpet and chip for easy disposal. Everyone has an old window blind, Venetian or roll kind somewhere tucked away That you will NEVER use. Apply it to your own wood tool, get it out of the way, roll it up
  20. John Morris

    A Little Hinge Trick

    When using small hinges to install delicate frame doors or any thing smaller then a standard cabinet door that requires a mortised hinge, I like to crimp my little hinges to close the gap between the door and the mating surface of what ever your installing the door on. Once you close the gap in the hinge, then mortise it in, you have a nice tight fitting door with virtually zero gap. The first pic is a standard small hinge, in this case I have a 2" brass hinge I bought from the home center for a display case I am building. You will see how "Gappy" the hinge is right out of the bag new. Put the little hinge in a vise, Then tighten the vise as tight as you can, be careful not to insert the hinge too far into the vise jaws or you'll just be crimping the hinge against the pin. The pic below shows my hinge after I tightened down on it. There you have it, a very simple little hinge trick for closing those gaps in your doors, works great for jewelry boxes, small cabinets, or for any project that requires small hinges. And, don't worry about marring the surface of the hinge with the vise jaws, because the jaws are against the bottom surface of the hinges, and I have yet to see any scratches on the brite side of the brass, but you can always slip a piece of wax paper in between the hinge to prevent marring if your worried about it. Thanks for reading!
  21. There are times when you just don't have that silicone brush, acid brush, or Popsicle stick, what are you going to do? Use your finger! But not just any finger -- use your pinkie finger. Why? You are less likely to smear the glue on the finish surface and cause a glue blotch or get glue all over your tool handle or glue bottle.
  22. A featherboard is great for controlling feed at the table saw, bandsaw, or router table, preventing kickback and keeping a workpiece firmly pressed against a fence for both safety and accuracy of cut. But there are times when a featherboard is best raised up off the table. For example, when rabbeting at the table saw, (Read more....)
  23. Here's a neat tip for squaring the drill press table- http://www.woodsmithtips.com/2015/10/15/drill-press-checkup/?utm_source=WoodsmithTips&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=9998
  24. RustyFN

    Nothing fancy.

    A friend of mine wanted some wood tips for his vape machine so I thought I would try and make a few. I made some out of blood wood and purple heart.
  25. kmealy

    DIY chisel guards

    If you're like me and keep chisels in a drawer and also buy them at yard sales, they need a chisel guard. Here's a no-cost way to do it. Get an empty water or milk bottle (1 gal HDPE plastic) Heat the side with a heat gun. After a few seconds, the plastic will turn from translucent white to clear. While still hot, plunge the chisel tip in and turn it to cover the tip. Pull it out with the plastic glob on. With a gloved hand, shape the end to cover the bezel and tip. Let cool.

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