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  1. The one thing I didn't like about my circular steady rest was it required moving the tail stock to put it on the lathe. When turning with a drive center, I had to be extremely careful to get the piece remounted in the exact orientation to reduce the chances of it being slightly off from its original position. Searching around, I found a post by Alan Stratton. Mr. Stratton's version permitted adding/removing the steady rest without having to move the tail stock. Here's a link to Mr. Stratton's website- https://www.aswoodturns.com/ I pretty much followed Mr. Stratton's de
  2. My process when I'm making lids involves two basic steps. First, mount a blank in a four jaw chuck, drill for the lid and fit it. However many I'm making I will do this step to all of them. When they are all drilled, they get flipped around and all the finish cuts and sanding are done. I discovered early on a four jaw chuck wouldn't work for the second step. There is no room for tooling and it puts my fingers too close to the spinning chuck. My solution was to make a wooden expansive chuck. That actually worked really well and I've been using it for years. It uses the s
  3. I found a nice piece of Black Walnut to use on the scratch awl hardware I made. I was going to nickle plate them but decided to just polish the parts and let them go to a natural patina from there. I have a small collection of awls and like the patina the older ones have. I had to buy the acorn nuts so I bought stainless steel nuts and washers. I turned a small shoulder on the acorn nuts to center the washer as the holes were a bit larger than the bolt. Take a look. These are a bolt through design and therefore would not benefit from a ferrule. Here is another loo
  4. I decided to make some scratch awls from scratch. I started with a 1/4"X4" bolt, a 3/8"X2 1/2" leveling bolt and a 3/8" cap nut. On the metal lathe I cut a long taper on the bolt, drilled and tapped the end of the leveler bolt to fit the 1/4"-20 bolt and turned the head round. I then drilled a 1/4" hole in the 3/8"-16 cap nut. I need to cut and drill the wood for the handle. I just used this piece of Oak for reference. I plan to polish and nickel plate all the parts too. The head will be recessed into the wood and will be used to hammer the
  5. I just purchased a "set" of 5 wood turning bowl chisels, made from files. I'm curious about how these will work for turning bowls. Any advice on the maintenance of these?
  6. Have you ever been working on, or polishing a piece that is supported only by the chuck and bumped it off center. I have and have been able to use the tail stock attachments to get it back to center. Provided that they will fit. However, my attachments are small, I have a mini lathe. When the piece of work is too large to fit the attachments, such as a hole in a in a piece, my attachments will fit in the hole. I made a couple of wooden Oak pieces similar to the metal ones to solve that problem. The one time I tried it out, it worked. I have NO intention using them for anything else. You
  7. This is my latest attempt at an off-center turning to produce an oval shaped tool handle. This was done out of ash. Be kind, I am still learning, as can plainly be seen.
  8. Clockman asked if I used an indexer when I drilled holes in a circular pattern. I didn't know what one was and looked it up. My Jet mini does not have one. Someone posted a site where I can buy one as an add on. I got an idea on how to make my own. The pictures show what I came up with. I drew 24 lines on a wooden disk with all the precision these ole eyes could muster. I drilled the center same size as the chuck shaft and notched each line with my small bandsaw. I have always had a home made storage area on the top of the lathe and used it to clamp down the pin holder. I used a ball point
  9. I researched the chatter tool and its use. I found this video and I'm going to make one. Thought you like to see it in action. Remember it only works on end grain.
  10. They are not done yet, but I went to Good Will and hand picked each one from a box that around 50 in it.. Tested for flexability and chose these. At 10 cents each, I'd say a real bargain
  11. Better add some sort of dust collection to this thing before I do anymore testing! This is what the finished “hood” looks like- (in place,top view, underside) Had the ½” plywood from another project. This is just a simple box. I wanted some way to hold it in place and be able to remove it without tools. Made two brackets from 1” aluminum angle “iron” to catch one side and some button magnets for the other side. Dust collection is a 2 ½” angled port that connects into the collection system. (catches, catch close up, magnets)
  12. Everyone here knows my project pictures suck. A couple of weeks back, in the Wednesday's Wisdom For Woodturners post, we added an entry from Mike Peace about his shop made light booth (https://youtu.be/waJ00FWTzHk). Also, @Gerald has a great 2 part blog on photography- https://thepatriotwoodworker.com/blogs/entry/24-lets-talk-photography/ . Using both of these resources, this is my interpretation. For me, one of the most important requirement was the thing had to be able to be broken down and easily stored. There just isn't any space left to put stuff. And just as impo
  13. The final major part of the assembly is the table. The piece of ¾” Melamine is from the scrap box at the local Vocational School and the piano hinges are pieces left from a project made for my brother in law. The top is reinforced with a frame of ¾” plywood on three sides and a 1” piece of oak on the hinge side. (top and bottom w hinge) The hinge is then screwed to a mounting/adjusting bracket that fits between the two sides of the frame. A slotted hole in each side of the bracket allows for vertical adjustments to assure the table is parallel to the
  14. It was finally time to add the sand paper to the drum. Having decided on a Velcro (hook and loop) system, it was off to Super Grit http://www.supergrit.com/ . Their store is only a half an hour drive from here. The hook portion required 5 feet of material. This PSA stuff is 4” wide and is $2/foot. Also bought 3 different grits of the 3” wide loop paper. Their minimum purchase is 3 yards but at between $1.50 to $2.00 a yard it is reasonable. It took about 73” to wrap the drum but I think I can get it down to 72” and be able to get 2 applications from 4 yards. The first step was to clean th
  15. Now that the drum runs true and the table lift works, it was time to start building the frame. My intention was to use mortise and tenon joinery but my choice of material was 2 x 6 for the top and bottom of the sides. This was larger than my mortiser could handle. I know, I could have chopped them out by hand. I opted for half lap joints. The overall width of the frame is 23” and the table height is about 31”. The length, at the bottom, is about 36”. The table is 16” x 24”. The frame is made of pine 2 x 4 and 2 x 6. All the joints are glued and screwed. The table is a piece of ¾” Melamine
  16. Most of the photos used for this part of the blog were taken “along the way.” As with everything made in my shop, there are always changes, modifications and “S**t! I should have….”. The first thing was when Mimi passed by and said, “it’s nice but where are you going to put it”? Anyone who has been in the shop knows you need a road map and a course in choreography to get around all of the stuff crammed in there. OK, we are gonna need some wheels to move this thing out of the way. (wheel axle, wheel mounted,complete wheel assembly, assembly front-rear)
  17. lew

    Part 1- The Drum

    When making my rolling pins, I use the thickness planer to bring the thin strips down to 1/8” thick. Unfortunately, if the grain in the wood is not uniform- or there are knots- the strips shatter. This wastes a lot of wood and doesn’t do the planer any good either. It seemed to me a thickness sander would be perfect for this process. Well, Craig’s List wasn’t producing any results and I couldn’t afford a new one. Time to take action! Starting with what seemed to me to be the most critical/difficult part; I began researching construction methods and gathering parts for the drum. The
  18. Maybe it is time to make your own. A lot cheaper than buying one and grinder and drill is all you need. Shop Built Texturing/Spiraling Tool
  19. Video from Capt. Eddie that includes shop turned glue blocks. Shows important points for well made glue blocks.
  20. My first one was really clumsy. it was mostly wood and nothing I did would hold up well. I used 3/8-16 threads and huge knobs and still I couldn't get a solid positional clamp; it kept flopping. Anyway this one is all aluminum and steel. I made it tool-less. There are knurled knobs for everything. I had an extrusion I mounted to the back of the lathe and hung it all from that. The threads in the aluminum are all helicoils.
  21. some gozillion years ago I was given a twin state Sgt Welsh rotary vein vacuum pump that fell of a truck. No really it fell off the truck & got damaged ( just the belt shroud) but there was an insurance claim and this one was unclaimed so the shipper gave it to me. And a decade or so later I'm finally trying to put it to use. I got a small air tank and welded bungs to it so I can run 1" piping to it. It is the vacuum reservoir in case of power failure. Then mounted it and the pump together around a corner on the other side of a wall and ran 1" copper to the lathe wi
  22. I have never posted into this Wood Turners area, so I guess this is a first. A friend asked me to cut him a 16" Longworth chuck so today I tested my drawing that I did in Fusion 360 by cutting a 12" chuck. Looks like it came out just fine so I thought I would offer them in our Etsy shop. You can click on the link in my signature and see the offering but I didn't want to post a link like I was pushing it, just thought you lathe guys might want to see this - I used to turn a fair amount and still have my Oliver 8' bed lathe but it's not being used 'cause it's 3 phase
  23. I had great hopes of getting to the basement shop today. We awoke to this- Perfect turning weather! But, as the saying goes- Best laid plans... Ended up shoveling ice and sleet, from neighborhood driveways, for several hours, balancing my Mom's checkbook and getting her taxes done. Anyway, lots happening with our turner since last week. @DAB posted a sweet looking pine bowl he turned. Pine isn't easy to get a nice finish but Doug nailed it perfectly. Read the comments on his work, here- @Gene How
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