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  1. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    The seat is weaved, and I placed the accompanying stool with it. I am pretty happy how this one turned out. I'll create plenty more, this was just too much fun.
  2. View File Woodcraft Magazine Issue 81 (Classic Shaker Counter) A wonderful plan by our sponsors "Woodcraft Magazine". Woodcraft has given us permission to share any items from their online catalog, thank you Woodcraft! Submitter John Morris Submitted 08/14/2022 Category Furnishings  
  3. Version 1.0.0

    5 downloads

    A wonderful plan by our sponsors "Woodcraft Magazine". Woodcraft has given us permission to share any items from their online catalog, thank you Woodcraft!
  4. Ol knuckle head sanding on a New Lebanon Shaker Rocking Chair. I built this chair from Curly Maple, it turned out very nice.
  5. That simple, little table has been delivered to a friend of mine's house,today.....time to clear the beck for action.. Haul 4 planks to the shop... And sort out for the best grain for a table top.. Thinking about the center 2 planks...the one on the left? Will get used as apron stock/drawer front....Need to cut things down to a more manageable size. Can't use the tablesaw, and can't use the mitreboxes just yet.. Have to do the saw work here....need enough blanks to make a 24" x 24" table top panel....mark out a line.. And get the saw down and ready to go.. Should do the trick? A "Cordless" saw.....I just happen to be the "motor" Waiting til Supper settles, then start some Cardio? Table will have a drawer, this time around...will need wider aprons on 3 sides... Stay tuned...
  6. steven newman

    Fancy Sidetable

    From the album: Walnut Night Stand

    Back view, showing the armrests, and the slats for the back. Back rung is a store-bought 7/8" dowel. Finish is two coats of Witch's Brew ( Pumpkin Pine?). The "bench" in the background is my Saw Bench, now over 2 years old.
  7. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    The seat is checkerboard weaved, with 5/8" fabric tape available at: Shaker Style Furniture WWW.SHAKERWORKSHOPS.COM Shaker furniture is the one truly original American style of furniture. Its clear crisp lines and singular lightness unite and...
  8. The Watervliet Shaker Historic District, in Colonie, New York, was the first Shaker settlement in America. It’s also where Mother Ann Lee lived her final days. Lee and seven followers left England and arrived in New York City in 1774 to establish a purer form of Shakerism. They established Watervliet in Albany County, New York, in 1776. While Watervliet was the first Shaker settlement, the first "formal" organization was established at Mount Lebanon.
  9. Our founders first met in 2001 to discuss what we could do to save this gem of Ohio's Shaker heritage. Since that meeting, we have grown to about 150 members, and in 2007 took control of the North Family's eight acres and eleven historic buildings through a lease from the Great Parks of Hamilton County. We are an Ohio non-profit corporation with IRS 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. White Water is one of 24 communal villages founded, in the United States, between 1787 and 1824 by the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, generally called "Shakers." It is the only one of four Ohio Shaker villages retaining most of its original buildings in their original settings and features the only standing brick meeting house in the country. Source: About Us
  10. Well it had to be to good to be true. Finished the coffee bar and the she wants a shelf with hooks for coffee cups. The real kicker is these are not the cups she uses every day but cups from the regular set of dishes. First up is to turn shaker pegs from walnut. This is something we have talked about in the turning forum. They all look the same but there are some variances. One has a larger button end , one is longer, one is shorter, one is thinner. But they are close enough that you may be able to tell some difference in photo however not all.
  11. Sometimes instructional videos can get long, and that is fine if you are mainly unfamiliar with every step of the process to make your project. This video however, was just right, assuming you already have a grasp on layout and design and tools usage, this young man goes through the basic steps on making a very nice shaker cupboard. I am in the process of making rail and stile and raised panel doors for mama's cabinet, using hand tools, and I wanted to get some tips on the process and order of steps, I found this relatively short video that included what I needed to see. Actually this video has inspired me to make a cupboard just like he is making, it looks like a wonderfully fun project! One of the best tips I picked up from this video is how to create sliding dovetails, check it out, it's really slick! Enjoy!
  12. I made Shaker berry boxes for a few Christmas presents this year. Four of the boxes have cherry sides and maple handles & bottoms. The fifth box is made from all poplar. The sides and handle are 1/8” thick and the bottoms are ¼” thick. The construction is 1/8” x 1/8” box joint. The finish is two coats shellac. Danl
  13. I made this in my tiny little shop (man, I’d really LOVE to have a window). Two are #4 hard maple shaker boxes with African mahogany tops. Also made two #3 shaker boxes from walnut with butternut tops. Hit them with some natural danish oil and after they dry for about 3 days or so, I’ll shoot them with about 4 coats of a satin poly. The hardest part for me is milling the stock to 1/16th of an inch....I seen to be able to get a better result on my table saw instead of the bandsaw....anyhow, I hope all youse guys are staying safe and healthy! I can’t wait until this comes to an end.
  14. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    I have already turned the posts and rungs and assembled this New Lebanon Shaker stool, next time I will install images of some of the process that is required to build these wonderfully simple stools. But for now, I'll show a couple images demonstrating the weave of these stools.
  15. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    This is the first time I have played with actually photographing my work in a more professional way, with the help of my kids, I think we did pretty good. This chair was another fun build, I just love these chairs.
  16. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    Arm with wedged round tenon.
  17. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    Rear of Shaker chair.
  18. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    If anyone has an critiques regarding the photography of this chair, please share, I want to learn how to photograph work like this. Thanks!
  19. Hi Guys, New to the forum and just recently resumed my woodworking (5 kids need no further explanation). I drew this shaker style step in sketchup, and made it from local cherry, it has a dutch oil finish. I appreciate the wealth of knowledge that the forum provides and am excited about learning all I can and honing my skills (considered an amateur). cheers dsb
  20. I love chairs. And I like building them too. I built several sculpted rockers in the past and while they are absolutely beautiful, the time it takes to build in the sculpted style is great, unless you are producing those chairs for a living, it can take quite awhile to produce one sculpted rocker. Not too mention there is much waste in those chairs, so I decided to simplify and take the edge off of building chairs by moving on to a more traditional chair and after looking at different styles of chairs and rockers I decided I wanted to build in the Shaker style. Building in the Shaker style can mean delving more into hand tools, or not, your decision. I made the decision to lean heavy on hand tools as I wanted to quiet down my shop, and try to limit dust as well, thus my discovery of building these chairs was a perfect fit. The book "Chairmaking Simplified" was my first leap into Shaker chair making. The book is wonderful, every page is full of images to help you along your Shaker chairmaking process. The beginning of the book launches you into the history of Shaker chairs, the joinery, etc, and then Kerry walks you through the building process. From recommended tooling, to setting up those tools, to using those tools, then on to the actual chair making process. If you are in the first steps of your woodworking adventure, you can build a chair using this book, and I might add for my Shopsmith friends, especially @Artie, you can produce at least two of these chairs on your Shopsmith, I say two because the rear legs that have to be turned on many of the chairs are too long for the turning capacity of the Shopsmith, but there are two chairs, and all the stools can be turned on the Shopsmith completely. During my construction process I had a few questions that needed clarification because I just wasn't sure about the diagrams on some of the chairs, I shot Kerry Pierce an email or two and he was very accessible with his information, and he communicated with me and cleared things up. If you want to study Shaker chairs, if you want to build a Shaker chair, I highly recommend this book. See my gallery of my very first Shaker rocker and stool I made using this book.
  21. Related Topics Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 1 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 2 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 3 (Curly Maple) The Finish Well folks, as were the others this subject was getting a little long in the tooth so I split this topic off from the 3rd entry. We'll show the finish and the seat weave in this topic. Today I was able to get out in the shop and get some finish on our rocker. I don't have really any images of the finish prep, there wasn't much to it, unless you like viewing a man holding sand paper. But mainly what occurred today was much hand sanding. I was able to leave the back slats and rockers alone, since I scraped them before installation, the figure really popped after the scraping and I was satisfied with that. And, the spindles came off the lathe sanded to 600 and then burnished with wood shavings, so the level of prep on those items were satisfactory enough to just go over once again with some 600 grit. Really I could have left all the spindle work as was, accept there was some grain raising around the joints as I cleaned up the glue with water during assembly. Also, over the course of time that I started this project, two years ago, the spindles all had a darker patina from just sitting around, than the flat work pieces of this chair. So in order to even out the patina I knocked it down by hand with 600 grit. A thing about hand sanding, this is just my opinion, when you are doing solid work like this, furnishings with parts that are many shapes, sizes, and point in various directions, I feel you must hand sand. You could hit the work with a detail sander, sure, but you are missing one very important item, the details. When you work a piece like this with power sanding, you are visually (or at least for me) kind of viewing the overall project as a whole surface, whereas if you hand sand, as you are sanding in any specific area, your eyes are drawn to that narrowed view, and you are focused, and you are going to catch many more unsightly surface features than if you powered through it all with an electric sander. Also by hand sanding, for me anyway, it's very peaceful. I had my chair out in my back patio area, it's late Spring, the trees are rustling in the wind, and the birds were chirping, and all you could hear from me was the shhhshhhhshhhhshhhh of my sand paper with the natural sounds in the background, it was really nice. I have learned to slow down my work considerably, and just to enjoy each process of the work, and not to rush anything through. This type of work lends well to that philosophy, because I really can't rush this anyway, because of the various components of a chair, my body mechanics must slow down, along with my mind, and consequently, my thoughts, and a peace builds up and the project is just fun, and relaxing. Sure you could do everything I have done on this chair with power, but why? Just so you can say you got it done faster? And with a bunch of noise? And therefore missing much of the happiness that surrounds these projects. So, I set my chair on the bench and shaped some tin foil into a bowl and poured about half a cup of Boiled Linseed Oil in the tin. I like using my home made tins, I can just use up the oil, and throw it away, there is no need to clean the bowl or container. With a white cotton rag nearby to apply the oil with we are ready. My dog Woody is nearby as usual now, as you may know by now by my other topics, he is deaf now, and he loves the shop! I love this part of the chair-making process, especially when using curly figured wood, all the efforts that were made to ensure the joints are tight and clean, the hand planing and scraping, the carefully placed wedged tenons, and chair leg pins, the pillow rail, the curly figured arm rests, it all comes alive in a crescendo of color and natural figure when the first swoop of the towel soaked in oil hits the chair, it's like Christmas all over again. I love this part. With my Appalachia music on in the background, and my dogs nearby, and my warm bench I am working off of, the chair comes alive. Something we have not discussed in prior chair topics, is the use of Ash for the top rungs that the seat is weaved around. You'll notice the Ash rungs, Ash is used because of its incredible strength, the Ash will hold a lot of weight without breaking or cracking. After I wipe on the first and only coat of oil, I'll revisit the chair several times today to wipe down the leaching areas as the oil resurfaces and beads. Typically I find about three to four times I have to revisit the chair, and wipe off the access leaching. This was a perfect day to start finishing my chair. I learned a trick a few years ago that I use often still, I can't remember where I saw it, or where I heard it from. With my chair projects, and virtually any project that you may want a darker patina built into the project before the finish goes on, you can set the project (chair) out in the sun, and let the sun do it's job for half a day or all day if you can work it out that way. I set my chair out in the sunlight for a tan, that's right, I let nature have her way with the chair in the sunlight, the sun will darken the chair a couple shades, and even bring out the curly figure a little more. Back in the day, I used to do this trick with with the project in its bare wood phase, pre-finish. But then one day I got the idea to use this technique after the first coat of oil is applied, I figured if it works on humans at the beach who want to oil up and get that sun tan, that it will probably work on my chairs, and other projects. So since then, I oil up my project, set it out in the sun for a few hours, and wipe it down as the oil will leach even more significantly when heated. A darker patina is created, and it's beautiful. Image below is the chair set in the sun immediately after the oil has been applied. A couple hours later, I don't know if you can see but the curl is actually darkening a shade. This is 5 hours later, in real life I can visually see the difference, the picture does it no justice, but perhaps you can see a change in color? So folks, the chair now has it's first and only coat of oil, and the wood has darkened a bit and the curly figure is popping, and I have wiped the chair down a few more times, and now it is back in my shop, awaiting for me to have a little more time for the final finish. I will apply one coat of General Finishes Gel Topcoat, then I'll wax the chair. Then, the seat will be placed. Thank you again for following along!
  22. Came home from work Thursday and found a wonderful box full of goodies for making Shaker Oval Boxes. I ordered this starter set to learn how to make the boxes, from John Wilson box maker. The Home Shop | Shaker Oval Boxes | John Wilson | Shaker Craftsman | Charlotte Michigan | 48813 WWW.SHAKEROVALBOX.COM It includes everything to get started from the water pan to bend the bands, to the forms to make box sizes from #0 through #4 and the copper tacks, the finger templates and a few more items to get started. I have Mr. Wilson's books that I purchased previously and enjoyed them so much, and I completely enjoy the man as well, I decided to go one further and acquire the set to get started. My goal is to learn these sizes, then as I progress I'll make my own forms and finger patterns for the larger size boxes. Any competent woodworker can create this kit on their own, but the reality is, I do like supporting a craftsman when I can, when funds permit it, and since I have came to know John Wilson through his books and videos, I like the idea of giving him my business anyway I can. Thanks Mr. Wilson! I'll build oval boxes along with my chairs and stools and other Shaker crafts and other items as well, and someday I'll get good enough to hopefully supplement our retirement when the time comes. I'll keep ya'll abreast of my box making progress.
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