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Found 18 results

  1. This is truly a magnificent bowl, there is so much waste of wood. I saw a video where a guy used a curved cutter to remove and save the center wood to make smaller bowls.
  2. I don't do turning, but have some friends that do. Here is a recent one that one top honors at the local Woodcraft store. In the last couple years, he's gotten into segmented turning and has some neat fixtures to help glue them up. The ghostly stool is a reflection in the glass display case.
  3. This has been one of those weeks that I have been busy as can be and don't feel like I accomplished much. I have about four projects in various stages and none of them completely finished. Oh well, I at least know that I have something to do each day. I have a batch of Pizza Peels that are in the process, but not finished right now. I am still sanding on the Walnut Vanity top and Kitchen shelf. The Oak cabinet doors were waiting on the cutting boards to come out of the finishing room. I did get a batch of ten cutting boards finished. Five medium size and five small size boards. So this weekend I am going to try to get stain on the Cabinet doors and Sanding Sealer on the Vanity and Kitchen shelf. The Pizza Peels should get finished also this weekend so I'll post pictures of those when done. So what is on your Patriot Woodworker agenda? We all look forward to Friday to see all of the projects you are working on and your plans for the weekend. Post your projects and pictures for all of us to see this weekend. What ever is on your agenda this weekend, have fun and be safe!
  4. I figured this would be a great place to document my path down segmented turning. That way we can all look back years later and laugh... Today I will start with why I am looking at getting into segmented turning in the first place. Last Christmas I was trying to figure out what to get my dad for a gift. He is at the stage where there isn't much he needs, and I had already made him a dozen or so pens. In the end I came up with the idea of a beer koozie. Strips of wood cut at an angle on each side glued together with one of those thin foam can insulating things spray glued to the inside (example in pic 1). Surprisingly, it came out well. My dad received many compliments on it an I had numerous offers for purchase if I made more. So I did, or at least I tried. Imagine trying to glue Popsicle sticks together on the long edge to make a cylinder. Yeah, I am stunned the first one went together at all. You can see in both pic one and two some of the issues I ran into. Really what it came down to was the material was too thin to turn, and there was no great way to get it into my lathe to turn it in the first place. I could make a round bottom, but 12 Popsicle sticks glued together does not actually make a circle but more of a circle-ish dodecahedron. So a circle bottom would leave many little gaps, or provided zero support when turning if I simply glued it to the bottom. I failed four times before I realized that this was probably not the best way to go about making a wooden cylinder. I did not make the jump directly from needing a cylinder to segmented turning. As with most breakthroughs, I put the idea down for a while and went on to other things. I follow a ton of wood people on YouTube and one of the videos that went by in my recommended feed was Kyle Toth and watching him turn a massive vase (if you have not seen it I recommend taking a look). So of course I start going down the YouTube rabbit hole and found one where he made a segmented wine bottle...click...I could do that with my koozie! So that started my research into segmented turning. In my earlier post I discussed how most of my searches took me to a place called Seg Easy. Next post I will discuss what I built, what I learned, and what I would do different with my first few rings. Please feel free to let me know what else you want to know, any questions you have, or if this simply does not interest you and move on.
  5. @Joe Candrilli has decided to go blogging! Way to go Joe! The blog area is a wonderful useful tool to show your story, and for a place to know that your story will not be lost in the archives of the forums, the blogs will last and last! I personally look forward to reading Joe's entries as he works, thanks for taking advantage of an often overlooked feature of our community Joe, the blogs!
  6. Hi all, So I recently became interested in segmented wood turning, and most of my research on the topic took me back to the same place: Seg Easy. Jerry Bennett has 4 videos on how to build, set up, and use a 'wedgie sled' to make segments. After building the sled, stop, and zero clearance strip I ordered a 'wedgie' from him. You can easily set up the sled using a protractor and some simple math (which I did and it worked flawlessly the first try) but I felt obligated to order a wedge and use the system as designed (plus I had already received a ton of free help from the site so I wanted to show support for him and his site). So I ordered a single wedge (he sells individual or group of 4), settling on the 18 segment wedge. The next day I received an email stating they were able to get a better deal on shipping and refunded me about $2.50 (who does that anymore?). Once the package arrived not only was my 18 segment sled in the envelope, but a second wedge for 36 segments as well, free of charge. I was stunned. That's it. I just wanted to plug a company that seemed to remember why they are in business...to help people. It has been a long time since I was able to say I had a pleasant shopping experience like this. http://www.segeasy.com/ Thanks.
  7. I wondered what it would look like if I bored holes in a block of walnut, glued in Maple dowels and turned it into a vase. It came out nice and the dowels made a great design that was uniform in shape and highlights the vase. Deeper cuts will also change the shape. I have plans to use other woods, but it will have to be a round toit.
  8. This is one of my better turnings. I had a piece of firewood from an old apple tree and saw some spalting in it. I combined some exotic wood rings in it and it came out beautiful. I am not good enough to hollow out something like this and if I was, the spalted apple would not holdup, it was pithy.
  9. I glued up a bunch of segmented plywood ornament blanks and am hollowing globes today. Just started hollowing this and one of those aggravating fall bees landed on my hand. I flinched just enough to get a catch. Hate it because after cutting, gluing and shaping I've got a fair bit of time in one of these. On the bright side it looks like my glue joints were pretty good and I'll use the rest of it for a two piece top. Steve
  10. Segmented plywood this time. Haven't done any of these for a couple years as I couldn't find decent plywood. The last piece I got from Menards had so many voids I threw most of my blanks away. I had a free shipping code from Rockler and bought a 3/4" piece of baltic birch. It was very nice to work with and basically had no waste. Steve
  11. Are they segmented? I thought of doing segmented ornaments for a while but really didn't like the idea of cutting the little segments and gluing them together. Seemed like a lot of work. I came up with a way to do inlay which seems easier or maybe it is just because its my way. I started out with making a jig to run the pieces through the saw. There are two side pieces with a two inch spacer block between. I stuck the side pieces together and drilled a .25 inch hole 1.50 inches from the end and 1.25 inches up from the bottom. In the picture the block between the center spacer block and the bolt was to ensure accuracy while gluing and was removed once glue was dry. It is 1.50 inches square. I drew lines down from the hole to help align the jig with the slot in the cross cut sled. The bolt is a carriage bolt with the head ground down to a .50 inch diameter. It is set in a counter sunk hole so the jig sits flush with the sled fence I took a 2.50 inch square piece of plexiglass, found center drilled and threaded it for a .25-20 thread. When threading holes in smaller pieces like this I chuck up the tap and bring the quill down and lock it from going back up. I put a rod through the slot where the wedge can be driven in to remove the chuck and tapered shaft to keep it from spinning. I then use the table crank to raise the piece up to the tap and turn the piece while I am raising it to start the tap. I have a screw center with .25-20 thread so I put it in the lathe and screwed the plexiglass to it. I set the tool rest at center and used the indexing feature to scratch marks into it at 60 degree increments. I cut blocks to use and drilled the centers. I mounted them to the lathe and turned them round. I then screwed them to the plexiglass base and marked the indexes. The stock can be the full two inches of the jig of smaller and add spacer to take up space. I put a mark on the jig to line up each index mark but put it off to the side or the marks get cut off when run through the saw. I did end up cutting the nut side of the jig to 3/8 thick to give it some flex and hold the cylinder tight as it goes through the saw. Here is a completed cylinder. Then cut some inlay to fit the saw slots and glue them in. Mount them and turn them whatever shape you desire. Make some finials for them and there they are. Some of you may have seen this. This is in the tutorial section at William Young's Woodworking Friends site and I had posted it at Wood too. I copied and pasted it here for those who missed it to see.
  12. I used some spalted Apple, yellow hart and Paduk to make this one. I am not good enough to hollow it out, but neither was the spalted Apple. I was worried that it would not hold up when I was turning it. My wife said this was a keeper. My daughter took one look and said, "Dad, I love this one" my wife nodded and I gave it to her.
  13. my first vase off the lathe. Just a few pieces of wood in this one more to learn and more to follow.
  14. lew

    ready for gluing

    From the album: Segmented Mortar and Pestle

    all the rings ready for stack gluing

    © Lewis Kauffman

  15. lew

    On The lathe

    From the album: Segmented Mortar and Pestle

    Glued up blank on the lathe

    © Lewis Kauffman

  16. lew

    finished turning

    From the album: Segmented Mortar and Pestle

    Finished mortar

    © Lewis Kauffman

  17. lew

    Completed segment

    From the album: Segmented Mortar and Pestle

    One glued up segment

    © Lewis Kauffman

  18. lew

    completed ring

    From the album: Segmented Mortar and Pestle

    Completed ring

    © Lewis Kauffman

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