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Found 121 results

  1. His mother wants him to be a few states smarter than his class mates when he starts to school......and this is a mighty good way to learn the states. The small puzzle was about all the 20" Dewalt could handle. Then I moved up in size and talked the Dewalt in to giving this larger puzzle a try...and he did it great.. The small one is what I been making over the years but got to thanking the larger one has bigger pieces and might not get lost as easy... I did leave out a couple but they were the least important. But after he learns the first 48 then I'll present him with the others...Can't remember their names anyway!!!
  2. Just to see how hard it might be on my small brain!! To leave out things and add different things to this original picture and still make the right proportions in size... I am using Rapid Resizer to try and guess the right size of things as to where I will be inserting them in this picture...Its truly a head scratcher thingy. First picture is what I am starting with and next picture is where I am at in my world of changes... Next picture I might get a few things to suit but not I am wondering. I found this front portion of a model A and since I needed more of something on the other side of this picture I used Rapid Resizer to flip the picture so I could use the same picture on the other side....and I made it a hair smaller! I also can't stain the wood where it will be white as snow so question mark on what it will end up looking like.. In this mess I decided to use things I traced compared to actual pictures of things so I will know what to do on the next picture for the actual likenesses for future projects.....and I can already see the things I traced then drew onto paper then scroll sawed out ended up looking terrible as opposed to things I actually attached pictures to scroll saw will turn out looking better if I can run the scroll saw on the actual lines of the picture?? I do hope to put a snow capped mountain behind the windmill so this small amount of white paint might be used? A project like this is to keep me doing what I like to do in the shop and not having to use lots of expensive wood in the process... and maybe keep my little brain from freezing up to become useless like it almost is now. I can still wave by-by so there!!! The female red bird I traced and she might end up looking like a duck or something??? Something else, when using the band saw to make shorter pieces, always cut the excess off the top of the pieces so what is left will lay back in and match up like it did to start with... So far the Dremel has been used very little only to see how to make the trees look kinda like trees?? This picture might end up staying in the shop down deep in a drawer somewhere!!???
  3. Hello All, My old craftsman bandsaw broke and of. course I broke it more when I tried to fix it. I was in need of a new saw so I bought this one from Amazon for around $80. It seems to cut well and it is very quiet. Since I am a neophyte to the world of scrolling I opted for an entry level saw. The ratings are pretty good and as an added bonus it takes pinned and unpinned blades. Do you guys think this will serve me well as a beginner? The Dewalt SS comes later WEN 3920 16-Inch
  4. From the faces I put one these folks they don't seem too happy but I'm still in the finishing stage so maybe they will cheer up before I get them shined showered and shaved! The baby was wrapped in swattling clothes and I couldn't find any of those while building this picture...
  5. @Fred Wilson has been our Scroll Saw Forum host for several years now, and he has done a bang up job in keeping folks happy, and helping out as many as he can. Fred's life has gotten pretty busy this last year and he is finding it hard to get over here as often as he'd like, so Fred is going to relinquish the reins to a new host (yet to be determined), and he is and has been focusing on family and life in general. Fred wants to be a regular ol member now, he'll still come aboard and chime in and hassle y'all, but just know that you can no longer beat up on Fred, since he is now officially off The Patriot Woodworker payroll and not bringing home his usual six figure salary from us, yet he is now a regular ol woodworker like the rest of us, just enjoying the view around here, and participating at leisure. Fred, thank you sir, for your service to our forum, and your un-ending patience with those of us who needed the help, and it was a pleasure shared by many I am sure, to know you, and to work with you. Thank you Fred, for your service to our community! If you'd all like to stay connected with Fred, you can also find him at his own website http://www.gopopsshop.com/index.php Hey folks, you can still purchase these exclusive Patriot Woodworker plaques from Fred! Fred made a batch of these back in the day and he gifted them to our sponsors as a thank you for their support. To order one please see at Patriot Woodworker Plaque
  6. On New Years Day we made our rounds and visited family, and we paid ol pops a visit. He lives in the local mountains, there was even a tad bit of snow left from the last snow he had! After we spent a few hours there we ventured up the mountain some more and let the kids roll in the big snow. But here are a few random shots of dad and his shop. Image below is what is leftover of his cedar pile of wood, he loves making birdhouses, and he sells them locally. Next up is his old 70's vintage Craftsman Band Saw And a late model Craftsman Contractors Table Saw he uses for secondary cuts or he leaves a dado on it at all times. Dad and I, two knuckle heads! Dad and Grandpa A smaller Delta Bench top drill press Delta Rockwell Table Saw with a Bies fence system A good ol Delta Scroll Saw His main go to compressor, he only uses it for finish nails, he doesn't believe in cleaning up so he certainly doesn't need air for that! Yes folks, it does snow in southern California, we actually had about 4" on the ground a few days before this. Over all image of the shop. Dad and I build this shop back in 2004. Rear shot of his shop Another rear shot. And just for kicks and giggles, Dad's home! A restored single wide trailer, we got this place for a song and dance, and pops loves it up in the hills. Thanks folks for sharing a bit of my Dad's place with us, yall come back now ya here!
  7. schnewj

    HELP!

    I need some help, guys. With the passing of my mother earlier this year I, now, have total dominion over the garage space. This allowed me to do a little remodeling, rearranging, and creation of some much needed storage off of the floor. This created a lot of open usable floor space. So, I have moved my Delta 40-690 20" (DeWalt 788) from its home in the garden shed into the garage space to live with my other tools. Now, for the help. The saw was purchased second hand. I acquired it from a retired vet, who was selling everything and moving to Panama. He used it to scroll out service branch plaques. It is in excellent shape but I have no maintenance history on it. Although I have used it a lot, it needs some TLC and it could use a PM on the internals. There is an excellent tutorial on R&R of the bearing, bushing and lubrication of the essential points, that was published in 2014 by Gwinette Woodworkers. In the four part video there was a reference to a bushing parts list and associated bearing numbers. However, the published link for the information no longer exists. The bushing are no problem and were all ordered yesterday. However, the bearings are different story. They aren't listed in the parts breakdowns and since the Gwinette list no longer exists I have no means of ID ing the bearings short of tearing apart the saw. I don't what to do that until I have the parts on hand. Experience dictates, that, I don't leave pieces and parts lying around waiting for replacement parts...use your imagination on that... So, by any chance, do any of you have experience or bearing numbers? If I can ID the bearings I'll just go order them...I'd rather have and not need, than need and not have. Bill
  8. "Back From the Archives" Hi, I am about to undertake the restoration, and upgrade of a Delta model 700 Scroll Saw. This model was available from 1931 to 1937 in the Delta catalogs. I have two of these saws, and will be using the best parts from both units to complete one machine. Both of the machines as I received them either had the upper blade chuck missing or broken, so this is where the upgrade part of the restoration comes into play. I will be using the plunger bearing, shaft, and upper blade chuck from a later model Delta Scroll saw to replace what I have found to be a rather unobtainable part to locate. At the same time I will maintain the ability to index the upper blade chuck, plus add easier to perform blade tensioning to the saw. First the saws. Now for a look at the original upper blade chuck assembly. Now a look at the parts that I'll be using for the modification. A comparison of the upper blade chucks, I'll be using the smaller one. A showing of the parts after a little rework. All machining work was accomplished using 180 grit sandpaper, and a 1/8" round file. The bearing was turned down with sandpaper to fit the upper head casting, and the large brass washers inner diameter were enlarged to fit the shoulder on the plunger bearing. These were in turn epoxied to the bearing shoulder, and each other. The file slot is for blade indexing, and gets secured using the 6-32 Brass machine screw, and knurl nut. The plunger shaft was cut just below the fiber washer, then 1" was removed from the shaft. The next step was to turn the head of the 10-32 machine screw down to fit in the end of the plunger shaft. This was then silver soldered into the shaft. This will accomplish the bade tensioning by shortening the shaft's length. The smaller brass washers will be epoxied to the top of the fiber washer assembly's metal part. Another view showing the assembly. Another view showing original versus the remake. And another. And a test fit view on the saw. Sorry about the photo quality, but this is my first time using a digital camera, it's also the first time that I've posted pictures to a website. So thanks for understanding. I hope that you have enjoyed the show, and thanks for looking. More to come later, as I now have to pick the best parts from the rest of the remains.... Oh, and who was it that said you can't fit a square peg in a round hole??? It all depends upon how you go about it!!!
  9. Need to make a few of these by you know when....I" thick maple is way too think for these small skinny letters..did some resawing to make sure when I cut out one of these letters I will be able to push it out one direction or the other.. These are a few of the resawed 12"x12" I needed for these logo's. Even though my maple has been in my shop for about 15 years and when I bought the large amount of the ruff lumber they said it had been milled some 10 years before the auction.. But any time I resaw 1" lumber I am parting some wood that has never been out in the air so I take no chances for warping to take place. I clamp it up so it will all stay straight until I start using it.. Now I'm waiting on some real small blades which has been ordered way too long and not gotten here yet...I hope they don't have to drive over to Germany to pick them up... They should have had them in stock anyway... The letters are only about 1/2" tall so I gotta hide the booze for the next few days. These shaky hands needs to calm down... I've cut out some of the bigger items and I might add when cutting things like this, once you start sawing, don't stop until you get back to the starting point cause if you do it will show up big time. I also have found over the years to get the best results I only go in one direction..that means I'm always turning the wood clockwise as I saw.... One good thing about using decient blades is when I finish scroll sawing I never have to give any attention to the flat areas the blade cut only the edges might need rounding a hair or not depending on the look a person is after. The blades make the flat areas smoother than what a person can make them with sand paper. If the blades are used too long a smell of burnt wood will give you a hint and burn marks will start to appear.. I've been using blades that are .013 wide and am waiting on some .011 wide. I've never cut out anything like this for the letters are out in the middle of no where so mistakes will show big time...
  10. Hello All, A while back, my wife picked me up a nice little Craftsman scroll saw for $30.00 a a local thrift store. I have manage to cut some thin (1/8th) ply with it but anything thicker I have trouble cutting accurately. Last night I tried cutting a 1/2" piece of spruce and as I was cutting the blade would jump forward about 1/8". This cut would be in an odd angle. It almost seems like I am cutting hard and soft wood at the same time. I can't cut a good circle to save my life. New blade, good tension and the teeth going the right way. I can't figure out why this thing chatters when I cut. I am new to using a scroll saw and it shows
  11. "Back From The Archives" Dateline: July,14,2012 , Location S.E. Wisconsin, Your roving "Old Machinery" reporter, has photograped a 1931-1937 Delta Specialty Co. Model # 700 Scroll Saw.....Yeah, I know " Big Deal ".... What's so special about spotting a Delta Specialty Co. Model # 700 Scroll Saw? A cast iron tabled with miter gauge slot, Model # 700 Scroll Saw that's what! Wait a minute.....A what?.....As found in the wild..... As the above photos show, at least one exists. The table is a one piece casting with the only identifying detail being the use of the normal Model # 700's angle gauge. It has been drilled and mounted to the cast iron table using drive screws through the face of the gauge. The rear trunnion mount is also a cast iron, machined piece. I searched the catalogs from 1931-1937, the years of the Model # 700's production run, but couldn't find any reference to a cast iron Model 700 Scroll Saw table. So is this a Delta prototype design?, or a rare Delta accessory?
  12. next will be my kind of carving also my favorite kind of woodworking. This is parts of three different patterns to come up with this size thingy.... Just finished scroll sawing the outside of this pattern. Its 1 1/2" maple and it sure does strain the saw. I think I will be inserting a few names somewhere in or on it.
  13. Canon MG 2522 cheapest we could find.. Now for the comments on its performance. This printer is on sale at Walmart for 19.00. This is the picture that is on my computer and this is what I printed out to use as a pattern to glue on to some wood. Its 34? long and clear enough to cut out with scroll saw. Cutting to the lines, which the printer provides for a person to cut off so the pages will line up for the clear tape. 8 pages for this pattern and the only ditty is holding the paper straight while taping. Can't be a nervous norvis while preforming this task. I have two different pictures of the clown first one I just printed out without changing size where the other I enlarged to 18" and it did make the lines a little jerky but the scroll saw blade should have no trouble going straight down the middle, so these are acceptable..this happened on the last two printers I've used when making a very large pattern. So having Rapid Resizer print anything my computer stores is okay. Being cheaper it is slower at the number pages a minute it will make but hey I'm not running a race with anyone. The ink for this canon was quite a bit cheap than the HP 4640 that wore out. When printing for a pattern I like to do it in black and white as the lines are better to follow when sawing out and I get to save on the color ink which is cheaper but if its a colored picture it won't redo in black for there are no lines just garble de gunk. The bad thing about this cheap of a model printer when wanting a great picture of something in color it just doesn't do a good job. First picture I took years ago of my box of hearts. Then a picture of the same shot with what the new printer coughed out standing besides the computer screen with the stored picture. Actually the very first picture was a different shot than the second one. So for my needing patterns from what pictures I store from the internet I think the printer is perfect and for a total of 21 bucks gets a 2 years replacement warranty.... I always use a backer board behind the hardwood I use to make the picture out of...After I cut the outside away from the rest of the wood I then remove the backer board and continue sawing out the pieces. This way I have something to glue all the pieces thats been carved and colored and sprayed back to the original body whether it be a clock a clown or what ever... Or like with this clown I save some wood around the pieces to be a frame then glue a piece of 1/8" to the back of the frame to glue the pieces on. Did I miss something? Yes I did. This canon 2522 does not have a slot for the photo card so I had to find my cord I use to plug in to the camera and the puter tower to transfer the pictures to the puter.
  14. Made these "word art" desk name plates for my dentist and his staff. The other two are for one of our Pastors for his new office and the other is for our youth pastor.
  15. From the album: Hunting, Fishing, Wildlife

    This piece is a brand new pattern I got just the other day. I used maple ply for the medium and torched the ends as to give a burnt log look. Thanks for looking!
  16. Dumb question here. Looking at some different scroll saw patterns, are you cutting out the black parts or the white parts??
  17. I have heard rumors of Exclibur being discontinued. Seyco is no longer selling them ! (The #1 guy for Excalibur). Sent emails to the manufacturer in Canada (General International) but received no answer from them. Soooooo, I reached out to Steve Good to see if he has heard anything. Below is his answer to me (reprinted with permission). "General International and the Taiwanese manufacturer of the Excalibur had a disagreement. I hear that it was not very friendly but I don't know all the gory details. Just the rumors.(not worth repeating) There was also a rumor going around that they had made up and General was considering starting shipping the saw again. I cannot verify that and I tried. The loss of the Excalibur was bad for the community but the gap has been somewhat filled by the Seyco ST-21 which is made by the same Taiwanese manufacturer and is very similar to the old Excalibur with improvements. It also open the door for King Canada to market their King Scroll Saws in the US. They are basically identical to the Excalibur with different branding. Unfortunately King can only sell the 16" and 30" machine in the US at this time. I spoke with their marketing guy and he tells me that is because of a contractual agreement and they hope to start selling the 21" King saw in the US soon. No word on what soon means. They currently sell the machines in Woodcraft stores nation wide." So, my friends, what are we going to replace our Excalibur when the time comes? Where are we going to get replacement parts? With the St-21 and KingSaw selling for $899, and being new to the scroll saw world, any decision is to be made. Any thoughts guys??????
  18. I have an old Delta 40-560 scroll saw. The air diaphragm, or bellows, that generates the air flow to keep the cut line free of dust is shot. I can't find a replacement for this part anywhere. I emailed Delta, but they don't have a replacement. They recommended I check with another company that specializes in obsolete and discontinued parts, but I struck out there. So here is my question. You know the flex seal product, where the pitch man sticks a patch on a leaking 5 gal bucket of water, or cuts a boat in half and then fixes it with the tape version of this product? Would that fix the bellows on my scroll saw? I'm thinking of a quick dip in a can of this stuff, or maybe painting a layer on the bellows with an acid brush. I use a scroll saw so seldom that a purchase of a new one, or even a used one, just doesn't make sense. Everything else works fine. I can use it this way if necessary, but after a while I get dizzy from trying to blow a steady stream of air so that I can see where I am cutting. Any suggestions?
  19. Hi, I am in need of advice from those more knowledgeable than me (so everybody). I’ve been looking on the various used items websites and have found two scroll saws I think I’m interested in. One is a 2004 Hegner Unimax, listed as brand new. This soon not seem to be sold any longer. They are asking $250 for it. Will it serve the needs of a newbie, and yet maybe last into journeyman status, or if I take to scrolling will it not be adequate in the future? Two is an RBI Industries scroll saw, used, and model number not listed. It also looks like the upper bar that holds the safety/clamp (I’m sure my naming of the parts is incorrect). That is next to the upper bar that holds the blade is missing. I have not received any contact back from the lister. This one is being sold for $75 which would give me some leeway parts wise. I got a lucky break over the weekend and got a $300 windfall, so either of these does not come out of the family budget (at least that’s what I’m telling myself LOL). Option 3 is wait till refund from taxes enters bank account, and dip into that for $250 and buy a new DeWalt 788 from Grizzly. I think that’s around $530 total, with shipping, stand and light. Any and all opinions wanted, and welcome. Thanks Artie
  20. First of all, when I use the term "trimming", to me, it means making the cut just a little bit wider. In scrolling there is no "untrimming" Let me put a picture up that might help: The red line is the blade and the blue line is my cut. I am cutting on 3/4" maple with some pretty hairy cuts. The blade I chose is a Flying Dutchman UR3. As you can see, the needed cut is a little over twice the width of the blade. My first cut is down the left side from A to B. Then I back the blade up and "trim" the right side from A to B. This was working great until, all of a sudden, this didn't work any more. Couldn't perform the task. SOOOOO, being the resourceful guy I am (and cheap) - (ops - meant frugal), instead of changing the blade I tried reversing the procedure. First cut down the right side and then followed up on the left side. Worked like a charm. OK, guys, what changed??????????????
  21. John Morris

    Scroll Sawyer

    This image is an open sourced image uploaded to this community for re-use within our community graphics.

    © Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

  22. I have a question about scroll saw blade nomenclature. I am doing a project that requires some scroll saw blade work, and the plans specify a #2 reverse tooth scroll saw blade. I understand the reverse tooth, but what does the #2 signify? I was looking at a scroll saw blade selection chart on the Olson blade web site, and every specification that I could imagine was listed on the chart, along with a Universal Number column. Any ideas?
  23. Ron has a good idea about the lathe and the person using it.. Comfortable to use so a person don't get wore out before he gets started using it. When I bought the new 788 in 99 I decided who ever built the stand that came with the scroll saw was about half off his rocker....So I went to thinking ....and here is what I use to keep me in the shop, longer, and with not as much aches and pains. I built a table to sit the saw on that is 19 1/2" tall. The saw is not bolted to the table, it will slide around as it sits on pieces of a truck tire inter tube... making it quieter, not a clue!! Sometimes I am sawing long pieces of wood and the saw needs to be turned one way or the other to accept the area where the sawing is fixin to take place.. I sit on an office chair with good swivel casters so I can go back and forth to the work top area a few feet away from the saw....Another good thing, which makes me follow the saw line better, I am mostly looking down on the piece to be sawn. Better results on saw-man-ship, not a clue again, but after building this set up , I got better at scroll sawing?? Most of the time these 788's don't bounce around much so maybe the inter tube is helping there?? This scroll sawing turned out to be the most comfortable tool useage of anything I do in my shop.. After I get a pattern attached to the wood then head toward to scroll saw, I let out a loud hurray or is it hurraw for the next few hours will be sitting down to where I can relax and make saw dust! And don't forget to turn on that box fan with the filter attached over there to the left of the operator! It took years to get my shop set up so tripping over objects in the floor would be a priority. I did leave room so I could get to the commode and the sink after I finally locate where they are! Does anyone have any good ideas to keep lumber stored thats not being used from day to day? The 12" Powermatic # 72 table saw catches all the overflow for all it is used for is cross cutting so it gets all the extra crap.... The sled on it is a permanent fixture for it measures 34x48" and is too important to stand up somewhere and get knocked out of whack. Yes I do take care of some of the small long pieces but sometimes I forget they are up there out of the way. And this fixture keeps some clamps close to the work table which is over the end of the table saw I call my work table. Its on a swivel so the clamps are easy to get to. I didn't say easy to squeeze, which they ain't!! A small metal strap bending tool is a good tool for making brackets for storing wood on the ceiling.. Oh, the drill press has a magnet to hold the chuck key but it serves another very important service for the light next to the magnet is too heavy with the extra large bulb making it too heavy to stay up in the air so the magnet holds the light over the work area also to even for. Its on a swivel so the clamps are easy to get to. And did I say not easy to squeeze? I decided getting up in age I need everything out in plain sight so I won't have all those drawers to look through. So I have lots of turn tables with lots of holes to display lots of small items. And I do think it has helped save wasted time..... Lots of experimenting went in to the 60 and 100 watt led bulbs in my shop and my house. I even had my wife take pictures of the receipts and the expected years these bulbs are supposed to last!!!!! I can just see the clerks asking are you sure those led bulbs were the 9 year, or the 18 year or the 22 year warrenty models or what???? We had just now finished installing all those curly cue light bulbs in all the shops and garages and houses receptacles and are now returned to the boxes the led's came in, with no where to go with them!! HO HO.
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