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Found 63 results

  1. After reading @Steve Krumanaker blog on his laser, it has interested me greatly, but on the cnc router level. But Steve's blog really got me thinking on this. Been looking at CNC Router home made plans and there is a whole community out there for this type of do-it-yourself and they are very supportive of one another, very open source, free plans, open source software, and just a neat community altogether. Thanks Steve for showing me.
  2. I am selling this "Made in the USA" 7518 3 1/4hp production router. $225.00 including shipping to the lower 48 states. This router was mounted in a table most of its life, I brought it off the table a few times to cut dadoes in ply for a few projects. The router runs as strong as the day I purchased it. I cannot fathom to figure how many hours are on the router, but if I took an educated guess I'd say around 15 to 20 hours. It was used for a few raised panel projects and for shaping my sculpted rockers. Please see images closely. I took many images so you know exactly what you are getting. I am selling this machine to help purchase my hand tools for Green Wood Carving of which I have become interested in heavily lately. One router, two collet wrenches, and a 1/2" collet. The base plate is missing the 4 screws. Once I know who is purchasing this machine, I will order the screws for you and have them shipped to your home, no extra charge. Several divots in the aluminum inside base. I turned the router on in the table without securing the router to the base, and the motor spun partially in the base during start up (please tell me one of you have done that before), and came off track in the base housing, and caused the minor damage. It does not effect the up and down action of the motor in the base at all, it turns up and down very smoothly. The damage is cosmetic only. Ask any and all questions here. Satisfaction guaranteed, returns accepted if you are not 100 percent satisfied. Manual is attached to this topic. PC 7518 Manual.pdf
  3. This router is for sale. It's the PC 891 fixed vacuum base with the 8931 plunge base and edge guide. It has the 2 1/4hp 12amp, with soft start variable speed. Made in the USA, my router has very little time on it, no more than an hour is on this motor, it's still new. I purchased it because I thought I'd use the interchangeable bases especially the dust free base, but I also own another plunge router that I used exclusively. This one never got any use. $195.00, shipping included for the lower 48 states. Instruction manual attached below. 892-instruction-manual.pdf
  4. I have a Bosch 1604 my Dad gave me that I wish to use for a mini router table. My plan is to leave a roundover bit all set up to use when needed. In making my mock up I realized that the limiter appears to be built into the body of the router. So if I removed, as in grind it flat, this would allow me to extend the router shaft above the table far enough to do above table bit changes. My question, anyone taken one of these apart? Is something important below this I should not be screwing with? Here are a couple of pics with the arrow on the yellow tape pointing out the nub in question. Also model # and other info in case that matters.
  5. In July, I posted a router-based method I used to remove the waste from hand cut hand-blind sockets (link). This involved orientating the boards vertically and routing into the end grain. This necessitated a rather clumsy piece of work-holding - which, as I explained at the time, was difficult to avoid as the end grain was not square to the sides, as is usual with drawer front. The bow fronted drawers created ends which were angled. With the usual square drawer fronts, both Bill and Roger on the forum preferred to place their boards flat on the bench and rest the router on the edge. Roger's photos ... However, this method leaves is too much waste remaining at the sides of the socket - as this is angled and the router bit is vertical - which means that there is more work needed to clear ... Bill's objection - that holding the work piece vertically looked too clumsy for easy work - continued to ring in my head. The horizontal method certainly had the advantage of being more stable. So, now that my then-current project, the Harlequin Table, is complete, between pieces I take some time to solve these problems. Which I have, and hopefully in a way that others will find helpful. Just as an aside, my preference is hand tool work, and generally if the wood is willing this is my go-to. The method here is not to replace all hand work, but to make the process easier in particular circumstances. Some of the timbers I work, especially for cases and drawer fronts, are extremely hard, and it is not viable to chop them out, particularly when there are several to do. It is not simply that this is time consuming - after all, this is just my hobby - but that it is hard on the chisels. I use machines to compliment hand tools. There is a time and place for everything. Let's take it from the beginning: Step 1: saw the pins ... Step 2: deepen the kerfs with (in my case) a kerfing chisel (see my website for more info) ... Now we come to the new jig. I must tell you that this did my head in for a long time. As with everything, there is a simple solution, and in the end it could not have been simpler! The need is (1) quick and easy set up, (2) accurate routing leaving minimal waste, and (3) visibility and dust control (bloody machines!). The jig This turned out to be nothing more than a block of wood. This one is 16"/440mm long x 4"/100mm high and 2"/50mm wide. I used MicroJig clamps, which slide along a sliding dovetail. This is not necessary; one can just use a couple of F-clamps. However the MicroJig clamps not only make work holding less finicky, but they extend the length of the board one can hold with this particular jig to 500mm. That is easily enough for most case widths. To use, place face down on a flat surface and clamp the drawer front close to centre ... Up end the combination, and place the end of the drawer front into your vise. This could be a face vise or, as here, a Moxon vise. Note that the image is taken from the rear of the vise ... This is what you will see when standing in front of the jig/vise ... Let's talk about the router. This is a Makita RT0700C trim router. Fantastic little router: 1 hp, variable speed, soft start. Together with a Mirka 27mm antistatic dust hose, the dust collection is amazing! The photo shown is after use, and there is no dust to be found (I very much doubt that a small plunge router could remain this clean). That also means that visibility is good, even though it does not have a built-in light. There are other excellent trim routers around for much the same price. This is the one I use. The base The base is the other half of the jig. This made from 6mm perspex. This is not the strongest, but does the job. I plan to build another out of polycarbonite (Lexan), which is much tougher. There is just the single handle as the left hand will grip the dust outlet. Below is the rear of the base. Note the adjustable fence/depth stop ... This is the underside ... Plans for anyone looking to make their own ... Setting up Step 1: set the depth of cut - I scribed marks on the fence for two drawer side thickness I use. Mostly I use 6mm (or 1/4"). The other is 10mm, which is used here. I shall make another, deeper fence, so that I can add a few other thicknesses, such as 19mm for case sides. Step 2: set the cut to the boundary line - this is done as close as possible. In the end I want to leave about 1mm to clear with a chisel (this is such an important line that I am not willing to take a risk here). If you move the bit side-to-side, the scratch pattern will show where it is cutting ... The result The router bit is 5/32" carbide. It is very controllable, and this makes it possible to freehand close to the side kerfs. The fence/depth stop prevents over-cutting the boundary line. In 15 seconds, this is the result ... Turn the board around to chisel out the waste .. Order of waste removal First lever away the sides. The waste here is paper thin and breaks away ... Secondly, place a wide chisel in the scribed boundary line, and chop straight down ... Finally, use a fishtail chisel into the corners to remove this ... A note: removing the waste this cleanly and easily was facilitated by using the kerfing chisel to ensure that there was a release cut at the sides of the socket. Regards from Perth Derek
  6. I've finally decided to make a router table, and incorporate a lift (probably Jessem Rout-R or Mast-R). Most of the prefab router tables I see have the router centered on the table. This would seem too waste a lot of the surface area behind the router bit. What bit clearance do you have on your table, and would moving it back a bit improve the use?
  7. Hmmm...do mine a bit differently.....no fancy jigs to build, nor fancy router bases to make... Did have to buy some goggles. I guess the vise could be called a jig... two lines, one for the dovetails themselves (base line?) the other sets where the base of the router is to stop....clamp the drawer front with the second line right at the top of the jaws.. I can either mark out the layout of the pins, or..just use the MK 1 eyeball, sighting down. Remove this from the vise, clamp to the bench top.. Hammer and chisel to clean up...use these pins to layout the tails... A few bandsaw cuts, cutting on the waste side of the lines ( more layout line you leave, the tighter the fit will be) After a glue up, and before things are planed smooth.... When there are a bunch to do....plus all the rest of the joints and grooves to make....less time building jigs = more time to build drawers... Of course, IF you feel you NEED all them fancy jigs.....
  8. Anyone using a sled like this? I like the clear plexi but wonder about using these when doing vertical router table cuts say for lock miter joint or drawer joints? https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/vertex.html This came to mind when I received an Infinity Tools email boasting their vertical sled. Looked online and really don't see plans for building one at all. Infinity's sled is here https://www.infinitytools.com/vertical-router-sled-4576 I also figure that doing vertical cuts like this will require a sacrificial backer board to prevent tearout which in turn reduces the width of the board these jigs will allow. So just how well would these work? Interestingly I couldn't find any plans to make one of these and I can't see it being that difficult. Any ideas?
  9. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  10. View File Workbench Magazine March-April 1967 Spanish Style Table This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 05/03/2019 Category Furnishings  
  11. About a week ago I was building a set of stairs for my son's new place, when the old Craftsman router started to shake badly. I drove home and got the Triton from my router table, which fortunately is equipped with the same Lee Valley base, so it would work in the jig. It ALSO vibrated, so I exchanged the 1/4" shank bit for a 1/2" one. WHAT A DIFFERENCE! Later that night I dismantled the Craftsman and found that a wood chip had been sucked up into the fan, bending it badly and breaking off two of the blades. The vibration resulted in a crack across the 1/4" bit shaft, creating the problem with the Triton. The Craftsman has served me well... I've had it for well over 40 years! However, after hearing of many problems with the newer ones, I won't be buying another one. A small Bosch may be in my future. Not the clearest picture, but can you make out the two bottom lines? THOSE WERE THE DAYS! John
  12. I'm having trouble with my router Plunge Locking Lever not fully locking. There is nothing in the manual for repairing this is there a solution somebody can give me? Thanks Pat
  13. To make those shallow rabbets, here is the tool you can make yourself.
  14. Thanks to being in too big a hurry. Grooves off-center, tenons not centered or square. More cracks and gaps than a Plumber's College. Dug around, found a 3/8" straight cutter bit for the router. Re-set the fence as well Re-cut ALL the grooves i had made up. Then went to work on those tenons. Do have a few test fits going on. Will try to post a few pictures tomorrow.... HATE RE-WORK!
  15. I had to get a bunch of shelf-pin holes in the current cabinet I'm building. I used to use a piece of pegboard. a drill bit, and some masking tape. I threw out the particle board when I moved. So I looked into something a little more professional. Kreg only did 5mm and I have a bunch of 1/4" supports in stock. Rockler had a bunch of options, most of which need a special self-centering / depth stops. Well, then I found this one on half-price sale for the price of one of the drill bits. And it works for both 5mm and 1/4" pegs. It also seemed to make cleaner holes with my mortising bit than with the drill bits. Used it today and did 140 holes, 5 at a time. https://www.rockler.com/rockler-shelf-pin-routing-jig
  16. I am not in the market for a router table, I sold mine last fall, don't need one, but I just thought I'd share my amazement with what Shopsmith has available for our machines. I did not know they made a router table, very cool. Anyone own one? @Artie ? http://www.shopsmith.com/ownersite/catalog/rm_routertable.htm
  17. I took the saw off the Dewalt radial arm and built a plate to hold a router. Next I used a geared down forward-reverse motor and put it in the place of the hand crank back on the top rear that use to raise and lower the saw. I then mounted the forward -reverse switch under the table in front so I could raise and lower the router with my knees as I held the wood I was working on... So instead of on and off, it raises and lowers the router.. I quickly learned I needed some help so I wouldn't forget which knee made it go which direction...the reason for the up and down on each side... The glove is there to keep my head from banging on the end of the arm while concentrating on what the router and bit is doing. This set up did take away trying to free hand a router on certain task...
  18. Decided to make a computer desk and to repurpose what I had left from the drafting table. The legs & the frame have a new life as a bench. Made that awhile ago. That leaves me with a desk top, 1 1/8" thick, & drawers. I cut the top down to 26" and kept the length. I plan on cutting down the metal caps on the ends to keep it from warping. A round over on the front & a little angle on the end to save the hips. I took the cut off from the top to get my material for the legs. The base is leftovers from a door that I took apart and made some floating shelves. I can flip the board & hide the hole. Routed some slots in the leg for that decorative element & a round over to soften them up. Cut the tendons on the table saw & will clean those up with a chisel. I'll put a couple of cross braces in the dead space. Layout & cut the mortise. I'll cut a taper on the ends of the base to keep from stubbing my toes. TBC
  19. Guys, I want to inlay a circle base into this shape how can I route a round rabbet on the inside of this shape?
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