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  1. It's been computer madness here so far this week! I think I need a vacation!!! Our Patriot Turners- @AndrewB used a glued up poplar blank for a pepper grinder. Looks really nice. He shows us some progression shots in this post- Andrew has found a new source for turning blanks. He gives us the low down in this post- @RustyFN gave us an update on the platter he started last week- Check Rusty's post for additional pictures and the start to finish thread- Rusty has also been busy with his
  2. While waiting for the Soectraply mill blanks to arrive. I'll be clearing my bench off rolling pin stock and building inventory for next year's show season. This should put 72 pins in the bins.
  3. Well, this is my first rolling pin of any kind. When I do something for the first time, I jump in and try the most difficult thing. This was “supposed to be a Celtic knot rolling pin. It looks more like a drunken knot...ha ha....I thought turning the taper would be difficult, but it wasn’t to bad. I know there must be a way of doing it....anyhow here is a photo of it. It’s Curley maple with walnut inlays...
  4. It's been a busy week here. Not much turning but still in the shop. Our Patriot Turners- @Ron Altier has really been industrious this week and wins the prize for the most posts! Ron is still experimenting with the UV activated finish he first mentioned a couple of weeks ago. He used it on this fabulous ornament- He describes more about what he is learning about the characteristics of this finish in his post- Ron also posted a question to our members about the Hut Crystal Coat finish. Check out his post and see if you can
  5. This is a re-post on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. I am a fan of “Cook Book” style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out. In addition, many of these photos/procedures have been refined over time and I will try to point them out by adding extra photos rather than rewriting the entire blog. I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it! The first jig
  6. The second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22” long and 2” square. Locate the center of the length (11”) and carry a line around the blank. The ellipses are 11” long and made of three pieces of 1/8” thick material Layout a mark 5 ½” on either side of the centerline and accurately carry the lines around the blank. To assist in laying out the diagonals, use a 3/8” thick spacer gauge, drawing lines on the blank, along BOTH sides of the spacer gauge.
  7. Once the blank has the layout lines drawn, it is time to cut the slots for the ellipses. The first step is to set the blade height. When the cut is made, there should be about 3/32" to 1/8” of material left holding the two sides together. This is necessary during the glue up by keeping the pieces aligned. Set the blank on the jig and adjust the angle and the end stop so that the front SHORTER layout line is positioned to the LEFT side of the blade cut. Orientation is when you are standing at the back of the saw looking forward. (These pictures are from the SIDES of
  8. I found it easier to glue if I oriented the blank with the diagonal cut facing up. I use an old restaurant cutting board as a gluing work surface and pieces of the cutting board as culls and pads. In this picture, you can see the three strips to be glued into place. They measure 2” x 10 3/4” x 1/8”. Test fit the pieces first to make sure they will seat into the slot. (I now have a thick piece of Corian countertop for the gluing surface) On my first attempt, I didn’t use enough clamps- using more clamps and culls assured that all of the joints were tight. I probably ove
  9. In Part #1, I mentioned that the pattern of the Celtic knot can be varied by how much wood is removed during the creation of the slots. Typically, I plow out a 3/8" wide slot and fill it with three inserts. That technique results in a pattern of knots that overlap- If the slot is cut, leaving a center slice of wood intact, and then placing an insert on each side; the pattern displays diamonds at the cross-over- Another subtle change in the pattern can be achieved by the sequence of the cuts related to the sides. I number ea
  10. We are having our annual woodturner's club picnic this Saturday. I didn't go to the last one because I was fairly new to turning, they want each turner that attends the picnic to bring a turning for the spouses' raffle, and I didn't have enough confidence in my skills to bring something. The wives, spouses, or others get a raffle ticket whose sole purpose is to determine the order in which they get to pick out a turning and take it home. No money exchanges hands, all just for fun. These are the items I made for this year's picnic, which, BTW, I got asked to organize. Not having attended l
  11. Happy Birthday America!!! Thunderstorms slowly moving thru our area right now. The annual fireworks display may be postponed. @Gerald posted a nice looking platter he is currently making- He has had several questions and comment about the process and the wood grain. @HandyDan added a nice image of one of his turnings to help explain what is meant by "feathering"- @Smallpatch finished up the teapots he has been creating- Final comments are in his post-
  12. Been a busy week in the shop but not too much wood turning. A friend asked if I would show/sell some stuff at his church's event. Seems they are looking for some vendors to attract folks to the event. I have never done anything like this but if it helps his church, I'm game. My biggest problem- as with most hobby woodworkers- is fairly pricing my stuff. Anyway, I've made some small (5 x 7) laminated cheese board. Have some bottle stoppers and of course the old standby- rolling pins. I needed to make some more rolling pin wall holders so that's where I'm at now. Lots of neat st
  13. Once the blank has the layout lines drawn, it is time to cut the slots for the ellipses. The first step is to set the blade height. When the cut is made, there should be about 1/16" to 1/8†of material left holding the two sides together. By not cutting through the blank it keeps the pieces aligned during the glue up stage Set the blank on the jig and adjust the angle and the end stop so that the front SHORTER layout line is positioned to the LEFT side of the blade cut. Orientation is when you are standing at the back of the saw looking forward. (These pictures are from the SIDES of the
  14. This second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22†long and 2†square. Locate the center of the length (11â€) and carry a line around the blank. The ellipses are 11†long and made of three pieces of 1/8†thick material. Layout a mark 5 ½†on either side of the center line and accurately carry the lines around the blank. To assist in laying out the diagonals, use a 3/8†thick spacer gauge, drawing lines on the blank, along BOTH sides of the spacer gauge. It is not necessary to layout both diagonal
  15. lew

    Drawing

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Line drawing of dimensions
  16. I am a fan of “Cook Book†style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out. I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it! The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project. It could be used for any diagonal bla
  17. lew

    Adjustable Jig 9

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Disassembled jig
  18. lew

    Adjustable Jig 8

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Disassembled jig
  19. lew

    Adjustable Jig 7

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Disassembled jig
  20. lew

    Adjustable Jig 10

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Disassembled jig
  21. I hope I am not jumping the gun on this, and stealing the wind from the sails of Lew, but I am so excited, Lew is re-posting his complete Rolling Pin Tutorial! You may have noticed Lew's images are taking command of the Photo Gallery line at the top of our site, that is because he is going to make available the images in the gallery, and in the topics that layout the construction of these rolling pins. So sit tight folks, it's coming it's coming! And thank you so much Lew for undertaking this huge effort!
  22. lew

    Widened Cut Rear

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Widened Cut Rear
  23. lew

    Widened Cut Front

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Widened Cut Front
  24. lew

    Trim Jig2

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Trim Jig2
  25. lew

    Trim Jig1

    From the album: Celtic Knot Rolling Pin

    Trim Jig1
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