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Found 73 results

  1. Shaker Rocker in Cherry Related Topics Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 1 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 2 (Curly Maple) Current Project So folks, I decided to break this topic up in parts as the last one was getting a little long in the tooth. So you can see the links above to the first two parts of my chair build. April of 2017 is when I started this maple chair, and as you know by now I decided to pick it back up and get back out in the shop and try to focus for once on woodworking as I did in Part 2. Thanks for following me! The back support rack is assembled as can be seen in Part 2. And now it's time to bore the mortises for the side rungs of the chair. The side rungs connect the back legs to the front leg assembly rack. I use a story stick for the entire chair layout, 99 percent of this chair is cut, turned, laid out, and assembled with story sticks. In the image below I am marking out the side rungs. Once the side rungs are laid out, I am using a slant support to bore the mortises at the proper angle, so the side rungs will splay out, thus creating a trapezoidal seat. So the front of the seat will be wider than the rear. You can see my first Shaker Rocker at this Link to get an idea of what I am talking about. Also, @Gene Howe, I know what you must be thinking, why use the slant table on a drill press that is fully capable of slanting its own table? I know I know Gene. For this Rocker I don't want to deviate from my norm, but next chair I make Gene, I promise I'll utilize the tilt table of my Shopsmith. Just a side view of my slant jig, also, the Shopsmith has a wonderful table that moves on two axis, first off the tilt, and the slide, in and out for fine adjustments in accuracy, this way I could clamp the jig to the table, and with the hand wheel I can slide it in and out till the bit sits directly over the line I need to bore, I really like my SS. Another view of what I am referring too for the sliding table, it's pretty awesome. First set of mortises are bored, I am using a Freud Diablo 5/8" Forstner with center spur or pin I guess you could say, it's a very clean cut. Some of the rungs are too tight to fit in the 5/8" mortises so I like to secure them in my vise and take some rolled 80 grit and work the tenon down till it fits snuggly in the mortise. After I made sure all the rungs will fit nicely, I did a dry run to see how they all line up, and they lined up beautifully. Now it's time to bore the mortises in the front assembly, you'll see these mortises are angled inward, to catch the side rungs that are angled outward from the rear legs. I used a story stick to lay these mortises out as well. Again, the Diablo by Freud really does a nice clean cut in this seemingly brittle Maple. In my desire to turn more and more towards hand tools, this may be an operation best suited for the drill press, as the angles in these frames are very important. I will practice with a brace and bit, there are tricks that Windsor makers use to bore accurate angles by hand, but for this chair I'll continue on the beaten path I know, just to get this one wrapped up successfully, this chair will be sold, so I can't afford big errors at this point. Now that the front and rear legs are bored out, I performed another dry run before glue up. You may notice at the left, it appears the side rungs were bored at an incorrect angle, they were not, well they were, but the error was on purpose. The books I am studying for building these chairs are written by Kerry Pierce. Mr. Pierce built-in a deliberate error in this these chairs, once those rungs are inserted into the mortises, the stress of those tenons are actually locking the chair together, if there is ever glue failure, the chair will hold together mechanically. There is a wonderful story in Mr. Pierce's books, he talks about repairing an original Shaker chair, the joints were loose, the glue was void, but one thing he noticed was the chair was virtually impossible to beat apart, and he surmised it must of been because the Shaker's introduced this deliberate error in the rung angles, in order to serve as a backup in case of glue failure. Now you can really see the trapezoidal shape of the seat. I only took the below picture to show the folks what my shop looks like now. Where the Shopsmith is sitting is where my wife's car parks. When I am done for the day I'll roll the Smith to the left side of the shop against my saw bench. So what you see here is what I am down too now, I have my Smith, my lathe as you can see on the back wall, my work bench at the rear left, and a miter saw cutoff bench at the left of which you cannot see the saw, but you can see the bench area. I have downsized considerably, for folks who may not no or have ever seen my shop before, there was a huge Grizz 12" table saw with an aircraft carrier bench right where the Shopsmith is sitting now. I had a 15" Delta Drill Press at the back wall where my cabinet makers bench is now, along with a 15" Grizz band saw, a Performax sander, and and a router cabinet, and at the right side of the shop out of picture, I had a 6" Grizz jointer, a planer, and a dust collection system. I sold them all, and to be honest, I do not miss them. But that's me, it was just time, I actually feel liberated being a relative minimalist. What started my downsizing was my desire to turn my shop into a more quiet experience and to start focusing on building with hand tools and in order to force myself to use more hand tools I knew I had to rid myself of luxuries. What quickened the downsize was my wife and I purchased her brand new car last Spring, it's the very first brand new car we have ever had, and it's a nice one, a 2018 Honda Pilot Touring, that is her daily driver, and I decided I wanted to give her, and her car a proper space to park, instead of in our driveway. Also the security of her being able to just pull in and close the garage door behind her, is really comforting for me. By the way, the garage door in this image actually leads out to our backyard, it's a pull through door. The two car door is behind the photographer. It's funny how life works out, we adapt, and often times, it works out really well. I'll end this tonight with my preparation for glue up. Once again, everything I need is on my bench, and within hands reach, all the rungs have been fitted, and the next post in this topic we'll see a chair assembled. Thank you all once again for following along! I'll install the rest of the images for this day in the shop tomorrow night.
  2. Related Topics Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 1 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 2 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 3 (Curly Maple) The Finish Well folks, as were the others this subject was getting a little long in the tooth so I split this topic off from the 3rd entry. We'll show the finish and the seat weave in this topic. Today I was able to get out in the shop and get some finish on our rocker. I don't have really any images of the finish prep, there wasn't much to it, unless you like viewing a man holding sand paper. But mainly what occurred today was much hand sanding. I was able to leave the back slats and rockers alone, since I scraped them before installation, the figure really popped after the scraping and I was satisfied with that. And, the spindles came off the lathe sanded to 600 and then burnished with wood shavings, so the level of prep on those items were satisfactory enough to just go over once again with some 600 grit. Really I could have left all the spindle work as was, accept there was some grain raising around the joints as I cleaned up the glue with water during assembly. Also, over the course of time that I started this project, two years ago, the spindles all had a darker patina from just sitting around, than the flat work pieces of this chair. So in order to even out the patina I knocked it down by hand with 600 grit. A thing about hand sanding, this is just my opinion, when you are doing solid work like this, furnishings with parts that are many shapes, sizes, and point in various directions, I feel you must hand sand. You could hit the work with a detail sander, sure, but you are missing one very important item, the details. When you work a piece like this with power sanding, you are visually (or at least for me) kind of viewing the overall project as a whole surface, whereas if you hand sand, as you are sanding in any specific area, your eyes are drawn to that narrowed view, and you are focused, and you are going to catch many more unsightly surface features than if you powered through it all with an electric sander. Also by hand sanding, for me anyway, it's very peaceful. I had my chair out in my back patio area, it's late Spring, the trees are rustling in the wind, and the birds were chirping, and all you could hear from me was the shhhshhhhshhhhshhhh of my sand paper with the natural sounds in the background, it was really nice. I have learned to slow down my work considerably, and just to enjoy each process of the work, and not to rush anything through. This type of work lends well to that philosophy, because I really can't rush this anyway, because of the various components of a chair, my body mechanics must slow down, along with my mind, and consequently, my thoughts, and a peace builds up and the project is just fun, and relaxing. Sure you could do everything I have done on this chair with power, but why? Just so you can say you got it done faster? And with a bunch of noise? And therefore missing much of the happiness that surrounds these projects. So, I set my chair on the bench and shaped some tin foil into a bowl and poured about half a cup of Boiled Linseed Oil in the tin. I like using my home made tins, I can just use up the oil, and throw it away, there is no need to clean the bowl or container. With a white cotton rag nearby to apply the oil with we are ready. My dog Woody is nearby as usual now, as you may know by now by my other topics, he is deaf now, and he loves the shop! I love this part of the chair-making process, especially when using curly figured wood, all the efforts that were made to ensure the joints are tight and clean, the hand planing and scraping, the carefully placed wedged tenons, and chair leg pins, the pillow rail, the curly figured arm rests, it all comes alive in a crescendo of color and natural figure when the first swoop of the towel soaked in oil hits the chair, it's like Christmas all over again. I love this part. With my Appalachia music on in the background, and my dogs nearby, and my warm bench I am working off of, the chair comes alive. Something we have not discussed in prior chair topics, is the use of Ash for the top rungs that the seat is weaved around. You'll notice the Ash rungs, Ash is used because of its incredible strength, the Ash will hold a lot of weight without breaking or cracking. After I wipe on the first and only coat of oil, I'll revisit the chair several times today to wipe down the leaching areas as the oil resurfaces and beads. Typically I find about three to four times I have to revisit the chair, and wipe off the access leaching. This was a perfect day to start finishing my chair. I learned a trick a few years ago that I use often still, I can't remember where I saw it, or where I heard it from. With my chair projects, and virtually any project that you may want a darker patina built into the project before the finish goes on, you can set the project (chair) out in the sun, and let the sun do it's job for half a day or all day if you can work it out that way. I set my chair out in the sunlight for a tan, that's right, I let nature have her way with the chair in the sunlight, the sun will darken the chair a couple shades, and even bring out the curly figure a little more. Back in the day, I used to do this trick with with the project in its bare wood phase, pre-finish. But then one day I got the idea to use this technique after the first coat of oil is applied, I figured if it works on humans at the beach who want to oil up and get that sun tan, that it will probably work on my chairs, and other projects. So since then, I oil up my project, set it out in the sun for a few hours, and wipe it down as the oil will leach even more significantly when heated. A darker patina is created, and it's beautiful. Image below is the chair set in the sun immediately after the oil has been applied. A couple hours later, I don't know if you can see but the curl is actually darkening a shade. This is 5 hours later, in real life I can visually see the difference, the picture does it no justice, but perhaps you can see a change in color? So folks, the chair now has it's first and only coat of oil, and the wood has darkened a bit and the curly figure is popping, and I have wiped the chair down a few more times, and now it is back in my shop, awaiting for me to have a little more time for the final finish. I will apply one coat of General Finishes Gel Topcoat, then I'll wax the chair. Then, the seat will be placed. Thank you again for following along!
  3. Shaker Cherry Rocker Related Topics Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 1 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 3 (Curly Maple) Current Project I hope to revive this project this weekend. All the components have been cut, steamed, bent, shaped, and now I need to chop the mortises in the rear legs for the back slats. The last time I touched this, was the last time I've done any real meaningful work in my shop, about two years ago. So far the stars are lining up for Dad and the shop the next couple days. Wish me luck! And plenty of this.
  4. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    The seat is weaved, and I placed the accompanying stool with it. I am pretty happy how this one turned out. I'll create plenty more, this was just too much fun.
  5. Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 2 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 3 (Curly Maple) Well here we are. Getting ready to cut into a nice 8/4 board of heavy Curly Maple to begin another rocker journey. Tonight I'm laying out parts and cutting. With any luck I'll have some slats in the steamer tonight. This photo does no justice to the figure in this board. I'll keep this topic going with this chair build. Thanks for following along! Legs are cut and squared.
  6. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    A wonderful project, I highly recommend anyone to build these chairs, suitable for most skill levels. The weaving in this seat was considerably more challenging than the square stools I weaved. The trapezoidal shape of the seat created some interesting challenges, but I got through them.
  7. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    Two front legs turned and ready for the rung holes. I turned these legs with my Easy Wood tools, a rougher and a finisher and my Laguna Lathe.
  8. Version PDF

    11 downloads

    Adirondack chair, how to make the two-seater rocking chair version.
  9. STILL WAITIN ON THIS LEG TO GIT WELL. THOUGH OF THIS. TELL ME WHAT WILL BE RONG WITH IT. YEAW, AT'S RIGHT, I DON'T KNOW PROPER DESCRIPTIVE NAME FOR back leg & back rest?? FOLLOWING WILL BE CUT W/ BAN SAW. CUT OUT FRONT LEGS FROM 2X? " " ARM REST USING 1X MORTISED INTO BACK ??LEG? " " BACK LEG/BACK REST USING 2x8 FOR THE CURVE, hope I can get both sides from 1 2x8, doubt it. BORE HOLES FOR DOWELS THRU SIDE OF SEAT " " 2& 1/4"OR 1/2". ALL DOWELS WILL BE HORIZONTAL INCLUDING FOR THE SEAT. MAYBE 1" DOWELS FOR SEAT. 3/4" FOR BACK. AINT DECIDED BOUT ROCKER ER NOT. STREACHERS = 5/8" FOR/TO LOOK BALANCED Anywho maybe yall kin git an idea.
  10. Courtland

    Walnut Rocker Front View

    From the album: Walnut Rocking Chair

    The seat is really fun to shape in these rockers, you get to make a ton of sawdust!
  11. Well, looks like I may be coming up for air soon! Been since the beginning of August since I've done some serious work in my shop. I just finished cleaning up and making my shop look like a workable space, and I set my Curly Maple Shaker Rocker on the bench that I started 5 months ago. I'm feeling pretty good here. I have my shop back! Dogs are enjoying the space too. I will sleep good tonight, the world is right again! Happy dogs!
  12. From the album: Walnut Rocking Chair

    The joints in these chair is known as the "money shot". They are really pleasing to the eye, but in the manufacturing process of the leg to seat joints, the process can go from great to disaster in milliseconds, and the project could be ruined. I am happy when the seat joint operations are completed! In this image, the first coat of finish is not applied yet, the sheen you see is purely from sanding through the grits, up to a 1000 abralon pad.
  13. A while back I got a set of plans for a kids rocking dinosaur. It was printed on both sides of a large piece of paper and folded like a road map. The parts were "traceable" as advertised, BUT large pieces of carbon paper were required and the various parts had lines that crisscrossed each other all over the place. To keep the original plans I tried making a copy but that turned out to be a mess. Then I got a bright idea and sent it off to MEBCWD to see if he could work his magic and turn it into a CNC file. He emailed me a file back that showed up like this. Mike is good with Aspire. He's even better than good, and ...... reasonable. $$ well spent. Got busy cutting parts out of 1" panels and 2 x 12's Parts are cut out!!! I took the edge off the exposed edges with a round over bit and did a little (very little) sanding. The rockers were just mirrored, so they were exactly alike. A cut up piece of 1 x4 and the platform was made. Now the big test. Will the parts all go together. So far so good! A couple of minor adjustments and the dino fit on the platform. There's 2 - 2 1/2 " construction screws in each foot driven in from the bottom. Mixed up some Rustoleum Hunter Green and Gloss White paint and made a mess. You can saw a wooden ball in half and make fancy eyes or cheat like I did and go to Michaels. The mouth is just painted on. It could be Vcarved if you wanted to do the two sided carving step. Advantage of using the CNC --- all the parts are as exact as you need for assembly. The band saw was never turned on. Each part is exactly the same allowing you to make 3-4-5 units at a time. Or, as many as desired, even if it's just one. Sanding is minimal. More on the finishing surface than the edges. Once you have a file on a thumb drive, you save it and bring it out whenever needed.
  14. John Morris

    Shaping the Arm Tenon

    From the album: Shaker Furniture

    After I cut the tenons out, I took them from square to round in just few minutes, testing the fit as I went.
  15. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    This morning I put the final coat of General Finishes Gel Topcoat on our chair, it should be ready to weave the seat tomorrow, I hope!
  16. John Morris

    Shaker Rocking Chair

    From the album: Shaker Furniture

    Once I weave the seat into the chair, it will be striking, I am very happy with this project.
  17. John Morris

    Shaker Rocker

    From the album: Shaker Furniture

    I love the patina this chair gained during the finishing, the cherry just got deeper, richer and thick. I love the tone.
  18. Hello, I'm going to be a first time grandfather in the fall. My son has asked me if I could build a sliding rocking chair. I was wondering if anyone out there has built one and has plans? Best regards to all, Ron
  19. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    I used my new Iwasaki 10mm wide file to get the sides and the bottoms just right for the final fitting of the rockers. These files are really really nice. They really remove the material very quickly, and leave a very fine finish. I bought this one at http://www.thebestthings.com/newtools/iwasaki_floats.htm
  20. John Morris

    Rocker Slots

    From the album: Shaker Furniture

    I pre-drilled a hole below the bottom of the legs, and between the saw cut lines, so all I had to do was chop out a little at the top and the rest just fell out, leaving a rough bottom, but workable with a file till it became flat for the rocker to fit into.
  21. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    I like the really slather the glue on with these, then I hammered home the walnut wedge to secure the front leg tenon to the arm.
  22. John Morris

    Wedge Tenon Rocker Arm

    From the album: Shaker Furniture

    While shaping the tenon down to fit in the through mortise at the arm of the rocker, I shaped it down a tad to small, but fortunately I was going to fit the joint with a wedge tenon anyway, so that alone took up the gap and and made it right.
  23. John Morris

    Shaping the Arm Narrow

    From the album: Shaker Furniture

    Still working on the arm narrow, it's almost there, but not quite, it's all by eye, whatever looks pleasing, is when I'll stop.
  24. John Morris

    Shaping the Arm Narrow

    From the album: Shaker Furniture

    After I was satisfied with the tenon fit, I shaped more of the arm at the tenon area.
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